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Missionary
A missionary is a member of a religious group sent into an area to proselytize and/or perform ministries of service, such as education, literacy, social justice, health care, and economic development.[1][2] The word "mission" originates from 1598 when the Jesuits
Jesuits
sent members abroad, derived from the Latin missionem (nom. missio), meaning "act of sending" or mittere, meaning "to send".[3] The word was used in light of its biblical usage; in the Latin translation of the Bible, Christ uses the word when sending the disciples to preach The gospel in his name
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Second Vatican Council
Four Constitutions: Sacrosanctum Concilium
Sacrosanctum Concilium
(Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy) Lumen gentium
Lumen gentium
(Dogmatic Constitution on the Church)
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Far East
The Far East
East
is a geographical term in English that usually refers to East Asia
East Asia
(including Northeast Asia), the Russian Far East
Russian Far East
(part of North Asia), and Southeast Asia.[1] South Asia
South Asia
is sometimes also included for economic and cultural reasons.[2] The term "Far East" came into use in European geopolitical discourse in the 12th century, denoting the Far East
East
as the "farthest" of the three "easts", beyond the Near East
Near East
and the Middle East
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Monasteries
A monastery is a building or complex of buildings comprising the domestic quarters and workplaces of monastics, monks or nuns, whether living in communities or alone (hermits). A monastery generally includes a place reserved for prayer which may be a chapel, church, or temple, and may also serve as an oratory. Monasteries vary greatly in size, comprising a small dwelling accommodating only a hermit, or in the case of communities anything from a single building housing only one senior and two or three junior monks or nuns, to vast complexes and estates housing tens or hundreds. A monastery complex typically comprises a number of buildings which include a church, dormitory, cloister, refectory, library, balneary and infirmary. Depending on the location, the monastic order and the occupation of its inhabitants, the complex may also include a wide range of buildings that facilitate self-sufficiency and service to the community
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Hiberno-Scottish Mission
The Hiberno-Scottish mission
Hiberno-Scottish mission
was a series of missions and expeditions initiated by various Irish clerics and cleric-scholars who, for the most part, are not known to have acted in concert.[1] There was no overall coordinated mission, but there were nevertheless sporadic missions initiated by Gaelic monks from Ireland and the western coast of modern-day Scotland, which contributed to the spread of Christianity
Christianity
and established monasteries in Britain and continental Europe during the Middle Ages. The earliest recorded Irish mission can be dated to 563 with the foundation of Iona
Iona
by the Irish monk Saint Columba
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Saint Boniface
Saint Boniface
Saint Boniface
(Latin: Bonifatius; c. 675[2] – 5 June 754 AD), born Winfrid (also spelled Winifred, Wynfrith, Winfrith or Wynfryth) in the kingdom of Wessex
Wessex
in Anglo-Saxon England, was a leading figure in the Anglo-Saxon mission to the Germanic parts of the Frankish Empire during the 8th century. He organized Christianity in many parts of Germania
Germania
and was made archbishop of Mainz
Mainz
by Pope Gregory III. He was martyred in Frisia
Frisia
in 754, along with 52 others, and his remains were returned to Fulda, where they rest in a sarcophagus which became a site of pilgrimage
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Roman Empire
Mediolanum
Mediolanum
(286–402, Western) Augusta Treverorum Sirmium Ravenna
Ravenna
(402–476, Western) Nicomedia
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Brazil
Coordinates: 10°S 52°W / 10°S 52°W / -10; -52Federative Republic
Republic
of Brazil República Federativa do Brasil  (Portuguese)FlagCoat of armsMotto: Ordem e Progresso  (Portuguese) (English: "Order and Progress")Anthem: "Hino Nacional Brasileiro" (English: "Brazilian National Anthem")Flag anthem: Hino à Bandeira Nacional[1] (English: "National Flag Anthem")National sealSelo Nacional do Brasil National Seal of BrazilLocation of  Brazil  (dark green) in South America  (grey)Capital Br
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Disciple (Christianity)
In Christianity, the term disciple primarily refers to dedicated followers of Jesus. This term is found in the New Testament
New Testament
only in the Gospels and Acts. In the ancient world a disciple is a follower or adherent of a teacher. It is not the same as being a student in the modern sense. A disciple in the ancient biblical world actively imitated both the life and teaching of the master.[1] It was a deliberate apprenticeship which made the fully formed disciple a living copy of the master. The New Testament
New Testament
records many followers of Jesus
Jesus
during his ministry. Some disciples were given a mission, such as the Little Commission, the commission of the 70 in Luke's gospel, the Great Commission
Great Commission
after the resurrection of Jesus, or the conversion of Paul, making them Apostles, charged with proclaiming the gospel (the Good News) to the world
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Anglo-Saxon Mission
Anglo-Saxon missionaries were instrumental in the spread of Christianity
Christianity
in the Frankish Empire
Frankish Empire
during the 8th century, continuing the work of Hiberno-Scottish missionaries which had been spreading Celtic
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Age Of Discovery
The Age of Discovery, or the Age of Exploration
Exploration
(approximately from the beginning of the 15th century
15th century
until the end of the 18th century) is an informal and loosely defined term for the period in European history in which extensive overseas exploration emerged as a powerful factor in European culture and was the beginning of globalization. It also marks the rise of the period of widespread adoption in Europe
Europe
of colonialism and mercantilism as national policies. Many lands previously unknown to Europeans were discovered by them during this period, though most were already inhabited
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Jesuit Reduction
A Jesuit reduction
Jesuit reduction
was a type of settlement for indigenous people in North and South America
South America
established by the Jesuit Order from the 16th to the 18th centuries. The Spanish and Portuguese Empires[citation needed] adopted a strategy of gathering native populations into communities called "Indian reductions" (Spanish: reducciones de indios) and Portuguese: "redução" (plural "reduções"")
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Gregory The Great
Pope
Pope
Saint
Saint
Gregory I (Latin: Gregorius I; c. 540 – 12 March 604), commonly known as Saint
Saint
Gregory the Great,[1] was Pope
Pope
of the Catholic Church from 3 September 590 to 12 March 604. He is famous for instigating the first recorded large-scale mission from Rome, the Gregorian Mission, to convert the pagan Anglo-Saxons
Anglo-Saxons
in England to Christianity.[2] Gregory is also well known for his writings, which were more prolific than those of any of his predecessors as pope.[3] The epithet Saint
Saint
Gregory the Dialogist has been attached to him in Eastern Christianity
Eastern Christianity
because of his Dialogues
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Indigenous Peoples Of The Americas
The indigenous peoples of the Americas
Americas
are the pre-Columbian peoples of the Americas
Americas
and their descendants. Although some indigenous peoples of the Americas
Americas
were traditionally hunter-gatherers—and many, especially in the Amazon basin, still are—many groups practiced aquaculture and agriculture. The impact of their agricultural endowment to the world is a testament to their time and work in reshaping and cultivating the flora indigenous to the Americas.[24] Although some societies depended heavily on agriculture, others practiced a mix of farming, hunting and gathering
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The Gospel
In Christianity, the Gospel
Gospel
(Greek: εὐαγγέλιον euangélion; Old English: gospel), or the Good News, is the news of the coming of the Kingdom of God
Kingdom of God
(Mark 1:14-15), and of Jesus's death on the cross and resurrection to restore people's relationship with God. It may also include the descent of the Holy Spirit
Holy Spirit
upon believers and the second coming of Jesus. The message of good news is described as a narrative in the four canonical gospels. The message of good news is described as theology in many of the New Testament
New Testament
letters
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Bible
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eThe Bible
Bible
(from Koine Greek
Koine Greek
τὰ βιβλία, tà biblía, "the books")[1] is a collection of sacred texts or scriptures that Jews
Jews
and Christians consider to be a product of divine inspiration and a record of the relationship between God and humans. Many different authors contributed to the Bible
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