HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Ministry Of Law, Justice And Parliamentary Affairs (Nepal)
The Ministry of Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs is a governmental body of Nepal
Nepal
dealing with the management of the judicial administration, legal affairs and legislative activities.[1] History[edit] The Department of Law (कानून विभाग) was established in 1950 before being developed into a ministry in 1956. Two years later, the ministry's portfolio was adjusted for the first time, making it the Ministry of Government and Law (कानून तथा संसदीय प्रबन्ध मन्त्रालय). In 1961, it was again renamad into the Ministry of Law and Justice (कानून तथा न्याय मन्त्रालय)
[...More...]

"Ministry Of Law, Justice And Parliamentary Affairs (Nepal)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Emblem Of Nepal
An emblem is an abstract or representational pictorial image that represents a concept, like a moral truth, or an allegory, or a person, like a king or saint.[1]Contents1 Emblems vs. symbols 2 Other terminology 3 Emblems in history 4 Emblems in speech4.1 Emblems vs. sign language5 Emblems in culture 6 See also 7 References7.1 Further reading8 Notes 9 External linksEmblems vs. symbols[edit] Although the words emblem and symbol are often used interchangeably, an emblem is a pattern that is used to represent an idea or an individual. An emblem crystallizes in concrete, visual terms some abstraction: a deity, a tribe or nation, or a virtue or vice.[clarification needed] An emblem may be worn or otherwise used as an identifying badge or patch. For example, in America, police officers' badges refer to their personal metal emblem whereas their woven emblems on uniforms identify members of a particular unit
[...More...]

"Emblem Of Nepal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Licchavi (kingdom)
Licchavi (also Lichchhavi, Lichavi) was an ancient kingdom in Nepal, which existed in the Kathmandu
Kathmandu
Valley from approximately 400 to 750 CE. The Licchavi clan originated from Vaishali in modern northern Bihar
Bihar
and conquered Kathmandu.[1] The language of Licchavi inscriptions is Sanskrit, and the particular script used is closely related to official Gupta scripts, suggesting that the other major kingdoms of the Classical Period to the south were a significant cultural influence. This was likely through Mithila, a region now situated mainly in India
India
with a small part in Nepal
[...More...]

"Licchavi (kingdom)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Index Of Nepal-related Articles
The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to Nepal: Nepal
Nepal
is a landlocked sovereign state in South Asia. The country is bordered to the north by China, and to the south, east, and west by India. The Himalayas
Himalayas
in the country's northern region has eight of the world's ten highest mountains, including Mount Everest, called Sagarmatha in Nepali.Contents1 General reference 2 Geography of Nepal2.1 Environment of Nepal2.1.1 Biota of Nepal2.1.1.1 Fauna of Nepal 2.1.1.2 Flora of Nepal2.1.2 Natural geographic features of Nepal2.1.2.1 Glaciers of Nepal 2.1.2.2 Rivers of Nepal 2.1.2.3 Lakes of Nepal 2.1.2.4 Mountains of Nepal2.2 Provinces of Nepal2.2.1 Ecoregions of Nepal 2.2.2 Administrative divisions of Nepal2.2.2.1 Administrative divisions by province2.2.2.1.1 Province No. 12.2.3 Province No. 22.2.3.1 Province No. 3 2.2.3.2 Province No. 4 2.2.3.3 Province No
[...More...]

"Index Of Nepal-related Articles" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

History Of Nepal
The history of Nepal
Nepal
has been influenced by its position in the Himalaya
Himalaya
and its two neighbors, modern day India
India
and China. It is a multi-ethnic, multiracial, multicultural, multi religious, and multilingual country. The most spoken language of Nepal
Nepal
is Nepali followed by other various ethnic languages. Nepal
Nepal
had experienced a struggle for democracy at times in the 20th century and early 21st century. During the 1990s and until 2008, the country was in a civil strife. A peace treaty was signed in 2006 and elections were held in the same year. In a historical vote for the election of the constituent assembly, Nepalese parliament voted to oust the monarchy in June 2006
[...More...]

"History Of Nepal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Khasas
Khasas
Khasas
(Devanāgarī: खश; Khaśa) are a tribe mentioned in the ancient Indian and Tibetan literatures. They were native Bahliki speaking peoples who lived in the northern Indian subcontinent.Contents1 Names and variants 2 Indian sources 3 Tibetan sources 4 Descendants 5 See also 6 References 7 Further readingNames and variants[edit] The original spelling for the name in Sanskrit
Sanskrit
literature is Khaśa (Sanskrit: खश) while variants of name also used are Khasa (खस), Khaṣa (खष) and Khaśīra (खशीर).[1] Indian sources[edit]Rajapuri (Rajauri)Rajapuri (Rajauri), capital of lord of the Khasas, in present-day IndiaThe Mahabharata
Mahabharata
mentions the Khasas
Khasas
as one of the northern mleccha tribes
[...More...]

"Khasas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Kirata
The Kirāta (Kirat) (Sanskrit: किरात) is a generic term in Sanskrit
Sanskrit
literature for people who had territory in the mountains, particularly in the Himalayas and North-East India
North-East India
and wh
[...More...]

"Kirata" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Shakya
The Shakya
Shakya
(Sanskrit: Śākya, Devanagari: शाक्य; Pali: Sākiya, Sakka, or Sakya)[1] were a clan of the late Vedic India
Vedic India
(c. 1000 – c. 500 BCE) and during the so-called second urbanisation period (c. 600 – c. 200 BCE) in the Indian subcontinent
Indian subcontinent
(present-day nations of India
India
and Nepal). They are attested in Buddhist scriptures of the late Iron Age
Iron Age
(c. 600 – c
[...More...]

"Shakya" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Gautama Buddha
Gautama Buddha[note 3] (c. 563/480 – c. 483/400 BCE), also known as Siddhārtha Gautama,[note 4] Shakyamuni Buddha,[4][note 5] or simply the Buddha, after the title of Buddha, was an ascetic (śramaṇa) and sage,[4] on whose teachings Buddhism
Buddhism
was founded.[5] He is believed to have lived and taught mostly in the eastern part of ancient India sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE.[6][note 6] Gautama taught a Middle Way
Middle Way
between sensual indulgence and the severe asceticism found in the śramaṇa movement[7] common in his region. He later taught throughout other regions of eastern India
India
such as Magadha
Magadha
and Kosala.[6][8] Gautama is the primary figure in Buddhism
[...More...]

"Gautama Buddha" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Maithali
Majority: Hinduism Minority: Islam · Buddhism · JainismRelated ethnic groupsMagahi people · Bhojpuris · Awadhis Maithils
Maithils
(Tirhuta: মৈথিল, Devanagri: मैथिल), also known as Maithili people, are an Indo-Aryan ethno-linguistic group who speak the Maithili language
[...More...]

"Maithali" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Sita
Sita
Sita
(pronounced [ˈsiː t̪aː]  listen (help·info), Sanskrit: सीता, IAST: Sītā) or Seeta, is the consort of Lord Rama
Rama
(incarnation of Vishnu) and an avatar of Sri Lakshmi, the Hindu goddess that denotes good sign, good fortune, prosperity, success, and happiness. She is esteemed as the paragon of spousal and feminine virtues for all women.[6] Sita
Sita
is the central female character and one of the central figures in the Hindu
Hindu
epic, the Ramayana. She is described as the daughter of the earth goddess, Bhūmi
Bhūmi
and the adopted daughter of King Janaka
Janaka
of Videha
Videha
and his wife, Queen Sunaina
[...More...]

"Sita" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Janaka
Janaka
Janaka
or Janak was a king of Videha. He is revered as being an ideal example of non-attachment to material possessions. As a king, he had access to luxuries and pleasures far beyond the ordinary, but his internal state was closer to that of a sadhu.[citation needed] He was intensely interested in spiritual discourse and considered himself free from worldly illusions. His interactions with sages and seekers such as Ashtavakra
Ashtavakra
and Sulabha are recorded in ancient texts. His relationship with adopted daughter Sita
Sita
led her to be called Janaki Mata. The Nepalese city of Janakpur
Janakpur
is named for him and daughter Sita
[...More...]

"Janaka" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Arimalla
Arimalla or Ari Deva (reigned 1200-16) was the first king of the Malla dynasty in Nepal. Beginning in the early twelfth century, leading notables in Nepal began to appear with names ending in the term malla, (wrestler in Sanskrit), indicating a person of great strength and power. According to the legends [1] Ari Malla was a pioneer figure in wrestling and the title Malla was thus made hereditary by the king to his descendants. Arimalla was the first king to be so called, and the practice of adopting such a name was followed regularly by rulers in Nepal
Nepal
until the eighteenth century. (The names of the Malla kings were also represented as, for example, Ari Malla.) This long Malla period witnessed the continued importance of the Kathmandu Valley
Kathmandu Valley
as a political, cultural, and economic center of Nepal
[...More...]

"Arimalla" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Singha Durbar
Singha Durbar
Singha Durbar
(Nepali: सिंहदरवार; translation: Lion's Palace) is a palace in Kathmandu, the capital of Nepal. The palace complex lies in the centre of Kathmandu, to the north of the Babar Mahal
Babar Mahal
and Thapathali Durbar
Thapathali Durbar
and east of Bhadrakali.[2] This palace was built by Chandra Shumsher JBR
Chandra Shumsher JBR
in June 1908.[3] The palace used to be one of the most exquisite and lavish of palaces in the world until the 1950s.Contents1 History 2 Design2.1 Exterior structure 2.2 Interior space 2.3 State Hall 2.4 Gallery Baithak3 Under Government of Nepal 4 Disasters4.1 Fire of 1973 4.2 Earthquake of 20155 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] It was built by Shumsher immediately after accession to the post of Prime Minister. It was initially a small private residence, but grew bigger during the construction
[...More...]

"Singha Durbar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Khasa Kingdom
Khasa-Malla kingdom (Nepali: खस मल्ल राज्य), popularly known as Khasa Kingdom (Nepali: खस राज्य), was a kingdom established in present-day Nepal
Nepal
around 10th century. It was ruled by kings who bore the family name "Malla" (not to be confused with the later Malla dynasty of Kathmandu).[1]:37 The Khasa Malla kings ruled western parts of Nepal
Nepal
during 11th-14th century.[2] The 954 AD Khajuraho
Khajuraho
Inscription of Dhaṇga states Khasa Kingdom equivalent to Gauda of Bengal and Gurjara-Pratihara
Gurjara-Pratihara
dynasty.[3]Sinja Valley, capital of Khas Mallas where earliest Devanagari
Devanagari
scripts from the 13th century[4]Some of the earliest Devanagari
Devanagari
script examples are the 13th century records from the sites in the former Khasa kingdom
[...More...]

"Khasa Kingdom" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Baise Rajya
Baise Rajya
Baise Rajya
(Nepali: बाइसे राज्य, lit. 22 principalities) was a former group of 22 kingdoms of khas people . around the Karnali-Bheri river basin of (modern) Nepal. The Baise were sovereign, but intermittently allied among themselves until they were annexed during the unification of modern Nepal
Nepal
from 1744 to 1810
[...More...]

"Baise Rajya" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.