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Mince Pie
A MINCE PIE is a sweet pie of British origin, filled with a mixture of dried fruits and spices called "mincemeat ", that is traditionally served during the Christmas season in the English-speaking world
English-speaking world
. Its ingredients are traceable to the 13th century, when returning European crusaders brought with them Middle Eastern recipes containing meats, fruits and spices. The early mince pie was known by several names, including "mutton pie", "shrid pie" and "Christmas pie". Typically its ingredients were a mixture of minced meat, suet , a range of fruits, and spices such as cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg . Served around Christmas, the savoury Christmas pie (as it became known) was associated with supposed Catholic "idolatry" and during the English Civil War
English Civil War
was frowned on by the Puritan
Puritan
authorities
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Beef Tongue
BEEF TONGUE or NEAT\'S TONGUE is a dish made of the tongue of a cow . Beef tongue is very high in fat, and 72% of its calories come from fat. Some countries, including Canada and specifically the province of Alberta , export large quantities of beef tongue. CONTENTS * 1 Preparation * 2 In cuisines * 3 See also * 4 References PREPARATION Tongue and pancetta with mâche Beef tongue is often seasoned with onion and other spices, and then placed in a pot to boil. After it has cooked the skin is removed. Pickled tongue is often used by the preparer because it is already spiced. If cooked in a sauce, it can then later be reused as a sauce for meatballs or any other food item. Another way of preparing beef tongue is to scald it in hot water and remove the skin, then roast the tongue in an oven, using the pan drippings to prepare a gravy
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Goose
Distant geese honking (help ·info ) SCIENTIFIC CLASSIFICATION Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Aves Order: Anseriformes Family: Anatidae
Anatidae
Subfamily: Anserinae Tribe: ANSERINI GENERA Anser Branta
Branta
Chen and see text GEESE are waterfowl belonging to the tribe ANSERINI of the family Anatidae
Anatidae
. This tribe comprises the genera Anser (the grey geese), Branta
Branta
(the black geese) and Chen (the white geese). Some other birds, mostly related to the shelducks , have "goose" as part of their names. More distantly related members of the family Anatidae
Anatidae
are swans , most of which are larger than true geese, and ducks , which are smaller
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Raisin
A RAISIN is a dried grape . Raisins are produced in many regions of the world and may be eaten raw or used in cooking, baking , and brewing . In the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
, Ireland , New Zealand
New Zealand
, and Australia
Australia
, the word "raisin" is reserved for the dark-colored dried large grape, with "sultana " being a golden-colored dried grape, and "currant " being a dried small Black Corinth seedless grape
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Mace (spice)
NUTMEG refers to the seed or ground spice of several species of the Myristica genus. Myristica fragrans
Myristica fragrans
(FRAGRANT NUTMEG or TRUE NUTMEG) is a dark-leaved, evergreen tree cultivated for two spices derived from its fruit , nutmeg and mace. It is also a commercial source of an essential oil and nutmeg butter . Other members of the genus, such as M. argentea (Papuan nutmeg) and M. malabarica (Bombay nutmeg), are of limited commercial value
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Brown Sugar
BROWN SUGAR is a sucrose sugar product with a distinctive brown color due to the presence of molasses . It is either an unrefined or partially refined soft sugar consisting of sugar crystals with some residual molasses content (natural brown sugar), or it is produced by the addition of molasses to refined white sugar (commercial brown sugar). The Codex Alimentarius requires brown sugar to contain at least 88% of sucrose plus invert sugar . Commercial brown sugar contains from 4.5% molasses (LIGHT BROWN SUGAR) to 6.5% molasses (DARK BROWN SUGAR) based on total volume . Based on total weight, REGULAR COMMERCIAL BROWN SUGAR contains up to 10% molasses. The product is naturally moist from the hygroscopic nature of the molasses and is often labelled as "soft." The product may undergo processing to give a product that flows better for industrial handling. The addition of dyes or other chemicals may be permitted in some areas or for industrial products
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Veal
VEAL is the meat of calves , in contrast to the beef from older cattle. Veal
Veal
can be produced from a calf of either sex and any breed; however, most veal comes from young males of dairy breeds who are not used for breeding. Generally, veal is more expensive than beef from older cattle. Some methods or aspects of veal production are controversial due to animal welfare concerns
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Jacobean Era
The JACOBEAN ERA refers to the period in English and Scottish history that coincides with the reign of James VI of Scotland
Scotland
(1567–1625), who also inherited the crown of England
England
in 1603 as James I. The Jacobean era
Jacobean era
succeeds the Elizabethan era
Elizabethan era
and precedes the Caroline era , and is often used for the distinctive styles of Jacobean architecture , visual arts, decorative arts, and literature which characterized that period
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Meat Pie
A MEAT PIE is a pie with a filling of meat and often other savory ingredients. They are popular in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
, Ghana
Ghana
, Nigeria , Europe
Europe
, Australia
Australia
, New Zealand
New Zealand
, Canada
Canada
, Zimbabwe
Zimbabwe
and South Africa . CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Regional variations * 3 See also * 4 References * 5 Further reading HISTORY This article IS WRITTEN LIKE A PERSONAL REFLECTION OR OPINION ESSAY that states a editor's personal feelings about a topic. Please help improve it by rewriting it in an encyclopedic style . (October 2015) (Learn how and when to remove this template message )The beginnings of the meat pie can be traced back to the Neolithic Period, around 9500 BC
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William Henry Hunt (painter)
WILLIAM HENRY HUNT (London 28 March 1790 – 10 February 1864), was an English watercolour painter . CONTENTS * 1 Early life * 2 Society of Painters in Water Colours * 3 Painting style * 4 Death * 5 References and sources * 6 External links EARLY LIFEHunt was born at 8 Old Belton Street, now 7 Endell Street , and was a resident of Marchmont Street, London and was apprenticed in about 1805 to John Varley , the landscape-painter, with whom he remained five or six years. He exhibited three oil pictures at the Royal Academy in 1807. SOCIETY OF PAINTERS IN WATER COLOURSHe became connected with the Society of Painters in Water Colours at its beginning, and was elected an associate in 1824 and a full member in 1827. Until the year of his death, he was one of the most prolific contributors to the Society's exhibitions. Many years of Hunt's uneventful but industrious life were spent at Hastings
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John Brand (antiquarian)
JOHN BRAND (19 August 1744 – 11 September 1806) was an English antiquarian and Church of England clergyman . He was author of Observations on Popular Antiquities: including the whole of Mr Bourne's “Antiquitates Vulgares,” with addenda to every chapter of that work. LIFEBorn in Washington , County Durham , he was educated at the Royal Grammar School and Lincoln College, Oxford . Initially apprenticed as a cordwainer , he obtained a degree from Lincoln College, Oxford, in 1775 and was appointed perpetual curate of Cramlington . Brand was appointed Secretary to the Society of Antiquaries of London in 1784 and was annually re-elected until his death. He was buried in the nearby churchyard of St Mary-at-Hill . When this churchyard was cleared, his remains were moved to West Norwood Cemetery within the enclosure that the church acquired there in 1847. WORKSBrand wrote Observations on the popular antiquities of Great Britain: Including the Whole of Mr
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Elizabethan
The ELIZABETHAN ERA is the epoch in English history marked by the reign of Queen Elizabeth I
Queen Elizabeth I
(1558–1603). Historians often depict it as the golden age in English history. The symbol of Britannia
Britannia
was first used in 1572, and often thereafter, to mark the Elizabethan age as a renaissance that inspired national pride through classical ideals, international expansion, and naval triumph over the Spanish – at the time, a rival kingdom much hated by the people of the land. In terms of the entire century, the historian John Guy (1988) argues that " England
England
was economically healthier, more expansive, and more optimistic under the Tudors " than at any time in a thousand years. This "golden age" represented the apogee of the English Renaissance and saw the flowering of poetry, music and literature
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Puritans
The PURITANS were a group of English Reformed
Reformed
Protestants in the 16th and 17th centuries who sought to "purify" the Church of England
Church of England
from its "Catholic " practices, maintaining that the Church of England
Church of England
was only partially reformed
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Marchamont Needham
MARCHAMONT NEDHAM, also MARCHMONT and NEEDHAM (1620 – November 1678) was a journalist, publisher and pamphleteer during the English Civil War , who wrote official news and propaganda for both sides of the conflict. A "highly productive propagandist," he was significant in the evolution of early English journalism, and has been strikingly (if hyperbolically) called the "press agent" of Lord Protector Oliver Cromwell . CONTENTS * 1 Early life * 2 Civil War * 2.1 Mercurius Britanicus * 2.2 Mercurius Pragmaticus * 3 Interregnum * 3.1 Mercurius Politicus * 4 Restoration * 5 Style * 6 Character assessment * 7 Selected works by Nedham * 8 Notes * 9 References EARLY LIFENedham was raised by his mother, the innkeeper of The George Inn, Burford
Burford
, Oxfordshire, after his father's death. His stepfather was the vicar of Burford
Burford
and teacher at the local school
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New England
NEW ENGLAND is a geographical region comprising six states of the northeastern United States
United States
: Maine
Maine
, Vermont
Vermont
, New Hampshire , Massachusetts
Massachusetts
, Rhode Island
Rhode Island
, and Connecticut
Connecticut
. It is bordered by the state of New York to the west and by the Canadian provinces of New Brunswick and Quebec
Quebec
to the northeast and north, respectively. The Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
is to the east and southeast, and Long Island Sound
Long Island Sound
is to the south. Boston
Boston
is New England's largest city as well as the capital of Massachusetts
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America
Coordinates : 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of America Flag Great Seal MOTTO: " In God We Trust
In God We Trust
" Other traditional mottos * "
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