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Milliyet
Milliyet
Milliyet
(Turkish for "nationality") is a major Turkish daily newspaper published in Istanbul, Turkey.Contents1 History and profile1.1 Ownership2 Editorial line 3 Digital archives 4 Notable people 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory and profile[edit] Milliyet
Milliyet
came to publishing life at the Nuri Akça press in Babıali, Istanbul
Istanbul
as a daily private newspaper on 3 May 1950. Its owner was Ali Naci Karacan. After his death in 1955 the paper was published by his son, Encüment Karacan. For a number of years the person who made his mark on the paper as the editor in chief was Abdi İpekçi. İpekçi managed to raise the standards of the Turkish press by introducing his journalistic criteria
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Daily Newspaper
A newspaper is a periodical publication containing written information about current events. Newspapers
Newspapers
can cover wide variety of fields such as politics, business, sport and art and often include materials such as opinion columns, weather forecasts, reviews of local services, obituaries, birth notices, crosswords, editorial cartoons, comic strips, and advice columns. Most newspapers are businesses, and they pay their expenses with a mixture of subscription revenue, newsstand sales, and advertising revenue. The journalism organizations that publish newspapers are themselves often metonymically called newspapers. Newspapers
Newspapers
have traditionally been published in print (usually on cheap, low-grade paper called newsprint)
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Babıali
The Sublime Porte, also known as the Ottoman Porte or High Porte (Ottoman Turkish: باب عالی‎ Bāb-ı Ālī or Babıali, from Arabic: باب‎, bāb "gate" and Arabic: عالي‎, alī "high"), is a synecdochic metonym for the central government of the Ottoman Empire.Contents1 History 2 Diplomacy 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] The naming has its origins in the old Oriental practice, according to which the ruler announced his official decisions and judgements at the gate of his palace.[1] This was the practice in the Byzantine Empire and it was adopted also by Ottoman Turk sultans since Orhan I, and therefore the palace of the sultan, or the gate leading to it, became known as the "High Gate". This name referred first to a palace in Bursa, Turkey
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Uludere Massacre
First insurgency15 August 1984 Yeşilova Şırnak Taşdelen Kulp Northern Iraq May 24 ambush Başbağlar Lice Bombing of Iraq Winter Campaign Steel Hawk Varto Sazak Hammer Dawn Murat Blue Market massacre Istanbul (1999)Second insurgencyHakkâri (2007) Ankara Aktütün Diyarbakır Sun Reşadiye İskenderun Hakkâri Istanbul (2010) Operation Hell Hakkâri (2011) Uludere Hakkâri (2012) Beytüşşebap Gaziantep ŞemdinliThird insurgencyMartyr YalçınPolice raidsArslan Kulaksız Hamza Yıldırım 2015–16 Şırnak clashesCizre (2015) Cizre (2016)Kandil Hakkari (2015) Silvan (2015) 2015 Airport bombing 1st Ankara (2016) 2016 Diyarbakir campaignSur 1st Diyarbakır 2nd Diyarbakır 3rd Diyarbakır2nd Ankara (2016) Bursa (2016) 1st Istanbul (2016) Midyat (2016) Şemdinli (2016) 2nd Istanbul (2016) 3rd Istanbul (2016) Kayseri (2016) İzmir (2017) Airstrikes in Syria and Iraq (2017) Turkish military operation in Afrin
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Self-censored
Self-censorship is the act of censoring or classifying one's own discourse. This is done out of fear of, or deference to, the sensibilities or preferences (actual or perceived) of others and without overt pressure from any specific party or institution of authority. Self-censorship is often practiced by film producers, film directors, publishers, news anchors, journalists, musicians, and other kinds of authors including individuals who use social media. In authoritarian countries, creators of artworks may remove material that their government might find controversial for fear of sanction by their governments. In pluralistic capitalist countries, repressive judicial lawmaking can also cause widespread "rivercrabbing" of Western media.[1] Self-censorship can also occur in order to conform to the expectations of the market
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Daily Mail
Northcliffe House 2 Derry Street London W8 5TTCirculation 1,383,932 (as of November 2017)[1]ISSN 0307-7578 OCLC
OCLC
number 16310567Website www.dailymail.co.ukThe Daily Mail
Daily Mail
is a British daily middle-market[2][3] tabloid newspaper owned by the Daily Mail
Daily Mail
and General Trust[4] and published in London. It is the United Kingdom's second-biggest-selling daily newspaper after The Sun.[5] Its sister paper The Mail on Sunday
The Mail on Sunday
was launched in 1982 while Scottish and Irish editions of the daily paper were launched in 1947 and 2006 respectively
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The Sun (newspaper)
Sun or The Sun is the name of the following newspapers:Contents1 Australia 2 Burma 3 Canada 4 Ceylon 5 Hong Kong 6 Hungary 7 Malaysia 8 Nigeria 9 United Kingdom 10 United States 11 See alsoAustralia[edit]The Sun (Sydney), a discontinued afternoon tabloid The Sun News-Pictorial, tabloid now merged into the Herald SunBurma[edit]The Sun (Rangoon)Canada[edit]Ordered by provinceCalgary Sun, Alberta Edmonton Sun, Alberta The Vancouver Sun, British Columbia Winnipeg Sun, Manitoba Brandon Sun, Manitoba Ottawa Sun, Ontario Toronto Sun, OntarioCeylon[edit]Sun (Ceylon), a defunct Ceylonese newspaperHong Kong[edit]The Sun (Hong Kong), a Chinese-language newspaper The SUN (Hong Kong), an English-language newspaper for FilipinosHungary[edit]The Budapest SunMalaysia[edit]The Sun (Malaysia)Nigeria[edit]The Sun (Nigeria)United Kingdom[edit]The Sun (United Ki
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Hürriyet
Hürriyet
Hürriyet
(Turkish pronunciation: [hyɾːiˈjet] ( listen), Liberty) is one of the major Turkish newspapers, founded in 1948. As of January 2018, it had the highest circulation of any newspaper in Turkey at around 319,000.[2] Hürriyet
Hürriyet
has a mainstream, liberal and conservative outlook.[1] Hürriyet's editorial line may be considered middle-market, combining entertainment value with comprehensive news coverage and a strong cadre of columnists. Hürriyet
Hürriyet
has regional offices in Istanbul, Ankara, Izmir, Adana, Antalya
Antalya
and Trabzon, as well as a news network comprising 52 offices and 600 reporters in Turkey and abroad, all affiliated with Doğan News Agency, which primarily serves newspapers and television channels that are under the management of Doğan Media Group (Doğan Yayın Holding)
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ComScore
comScore is an American media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers.Contents1 History1.1 Mergers and acquisitions2 Data collection and reporting 3 Unified Digital Measurement 4 Campaign measurement 5 Criticism 6 Awards 7 Competitors and alliances 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] ComScore
ComScore
Networks was founded in July 1999 in Reston, Virginia.[3] The company was co-founded by Gian Fulgoni, who was for many years the CEO of market research company
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Pope John Paul II
Pope
Pope
Saint
Saint
John Paul II (Latin: Ioannes Paulus II; Italian: Giovanni Paolo II; Polish: Jan Paweł II; born Karol Józef Wojtyła;[a] [ˈkarɔl ˈjuzɛv vɔjˈtɨwa];[b] 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) served as Pope
Pope
of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
and sovereign of Vatican City from 1978 to 2005. He is called Saint
Saint
John Paul the Great by some Catholics.[6][7][8] He was elected by the second Papal conclave of 1978, which was called after Pope
Pope
John Paul I, who had been elected in August to succeed Pope Paul VI, died after thirty-three days
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Middle-market Newspaper
A middle-market newspaper is one that attempts to cater to readers who want some entertainment from their newspaper as well as the coverage of important news events. Middle-market status is the halfway point of a three-level continuum of journalistic seriousness; uppermarket or "quality" newspapers generally cover hard news and down-market newspapers favour sensationalist stories. In the United Kingdom, since the demise of Today (1986–1995), the only national middle-market papers are the Daily Mail
Daily Mail
and the Daily Express, distinguishable by their black-top masthead (both use the easy-to-carry tabloid paper size), as opposed to the red-top mastheads of down-market tabloids.[1] See also[edit] Journalism
Journalism
portalReferences[edit]^ Read all about it!: a history of the British newspaper Kevin Williams; Taylor & Francis, 2010; page 9This journalism-related article is a stub
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Turkish Nationalism
Turkish nationalism
Turkish nationalism
is a political ideology that promotes and glorifies the Turkish people, as either a national, ethnic, or linguistic group.Contents1 History1.1 Variants1.1.1 Pan-Turkism 1.1.2 Anatolianism 1.1.3 Turkish Islamic synthesis2 The "Insulting Turkishness" laws 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksHistory[edit] After the Fall of the Ottoman Empire, Mustafa Kemal came to power. Atatürk introduced Hilaire de Barenton's
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Kemalism
GoalsGoals Political Social Legal Educational Economic AnalysisKemalismPhilosophy Republicanism Populism Laicism Reformism Nationalism Statism AnalysisAlsoState funeral Centennial Timeline Cult of personalityGallery: Picture, Sound, Videov t ePart of a series onNationalismDevelopmentAnthem Colours Flag Flower Epic God Identity Language Music Myth Sport Symbol TreasureCore valuesIdentity Self-determination SolidarityTypesAfrican Alt-right Banal Blind Bourgeois Business Civic Conservative Constitutional patriotism Corporate Cultural Cyber- Ecological Economic Ethnic Expansionist Homonationalist Integral Left-wingCommunistLiberal Mystic National-anarchist National Bolshevik National syndicalist Nazism Neo- New Pan- Plurinationalist Post- Queer RacialBlack WhiteReligiousChristianTechnological Territorial Transnationalism UltranationalismO
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Bağcılar
Bağcılar
Bağcılar
is a working class suburban district of Istanbul, Turkey. It is located behind Bahçelievler
Bahçelievler
on the European side of the city, between the two major ring roads, the TEM and the E5. The mayor is Lokman Çağırıcı (AKP). Sparsely populated countryside at the time of founding of the Turkish republic, bağcılar means "vine growers" in Turkish and was known as "Yeşilbağ" (Green Vineyard in Turkish). But the district has been urbanized within the last decades. Most of the housing in Bağcılar was illegally built Gecekondu
Gecekondu
but has now been replaced by rows of cramped apartment buildings, also built with minimal regulation
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Secularism
Secularism
Secularism
is the principle of the separation of government institutions and persons mandated to represent the state from religious institution and religious dignitaries (the attainment of such is termed secularity)
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Center-left
Centre-left politics or center-left politics (American English), also referred to as moderate-left politics, is an adherence to views leaning to the left-wing, but closer to the centre on the left–right political spectrum than other left-wing variants
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