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Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-21
The Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-21
Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-21
(Russian: Микоян и Гуревич МиГ-21; NATO reporting name: Fishbed) is a supersonic jet fighter and interceptor aircraft, designed by the Mikoyan-Gurevich Design Bureau in the Soviet Union
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Tbilisi
Tbilisi
Tbilisi
(English: /təbɪˈliːsi, təˈbɪlɪsi/ tə-bih-LEE-see, tə-BIL-ih-see;[3] Georgian: თბილისი [tʰbilisi] ( listen)), in some countries also still named by its pre-1936 international designation Tiflis[4] (/ˈtɪflɪs/ TIF-liss),[3] is the capital and the largest city of Georgia, lying on the banks of the Kura River with a population of approximately 1.5 million people. Founded in the 5th century AD by Vakhtang I of Iberia, since then Tbilisi
Tbilisi
served as the capital of various Georgian kingdoms and republics
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OKB
OKB is a transliteration of the Russian initials of "Опытное конструкторское бюро" – Opytnoye Konstruktorskoye Buro, meaning Experimental Design Bureau. During the Soviet era, OKBs were closed institutions working on design and prototyping of advanced technology, usually for military applications. A bureau was officially identified by a number, and often semi-officially by the name of its lead designer – for example, OKB-51 was led by Pavel Sukhoi, and it eventually became known as the OKB of Sukhoi. Successful and famous bureaus often retained this name even after the death or replacement of their designers. These relatively small state-run organisations were not intended for the mass production of aircraft, rockets, or other vehicles or equipment which they designed. However they usually had the facilities and resources to construct prototypes
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Turbojet
The turbojet is an airbreathing jet engine, typically used in aircraft. It consists of a gas turbine with a propelling nozzle. The gas turbine has an air inlet, a compressor, a combustion chamber, and a turbine (that drives the compressor). The compressed air from the compressor is heated by the fuel in the combustion chamber and then allowed to expand through the turbine. The turbine exhaust is then expanded in the propelling nozzle where it is accelerated to high speed to provide thrust.[1] Two engineers, Frank Whittle
Frank Whittle
in the United Kingdom and Hans von Ohain
Hans von Ohain
in Germany, developed the concept independently into practical engines during the late 1930s. Turbojets have been replaced in slower aircraft by turboprops because they have better range-specific fuel consumption. At medium speeds, where the propeller is no longer efficient, turboprops have been replaced by turbofans
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Tushino Airfield
Tushino
Tushino
airfield (Russian: Аэродром Тушино) (ICAO: UUUS) is a former general aviation airfield located in Tushino, northwest Moscow, Russia. During the Cold War, this was the site of military exercises showcasing the latest in Soviet innovation. These exercises were held on Soviet Air Fleet Day.Contents1 Dates1.1 Soviet Air Fleet Day 1.2 May Day 1.3 Other2 See also 3 References 4 External linksDates[edit] Soviet Air Fleet Day[edit] The most frequent date of air shows was the Soviet Air Fleet Day (Russian: День Воздушного Флота). It was also known as the Soviet Air Forces
Soviet Air Forces
Day (Russian: День Военно-воздушных Сил), or Soviet Aviation Day.[1] It was established in 1933.[2] In the period from 1933 to 1940 it was held on August 18, a free day in the calendar of that time
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Soviet Aviation Day
In the life of Soviet Union, air shows were a highly regarded type of parade, almost always of military nature. They happened on various occasions and anniversaries, in many locations across the country. A notable air show was the Tushino Air Show held annually in August.Contents1 Dates1.1 Soviet Air Fleet Day 1.2 May Day 1.3 Other2 Notable first appearances 3 See also 4 ReferencesDates[edit] Soviet Air Fleet Day[edit] The most frequent date of air shows was the Soviet Air Fleet Day (Russian: День Воздушного Флота). It was also known as the Soviet Air Forces
Soviet Air Forces
Day (Russian: День Военно-воздушных Сил), or Soviet Aviation Day.[1] It was established in 1933[2] and was most usually held on the third Sunday of August,[3][4][5] weather permitting
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Lockheed F-104 Starfighter
The Lockheed F-104 Starfighter
Lockheed F-104 Starfighter
is a single-engine, supersonic interceptor aircraft which later became widely used as an attack aircraft. It was originally developed by Lockheed for the United States Air Force (USAF), but was later produced by several other nations, seeing widespread service outside the United States. One of the Century Series
Century Series
of fighter aircraft, it was operated by the air forces of more than a dozen nations from 1958 to 2004. Its design team was led by Kelly Johnson, who contributed to the development of the Lockheed P-38 Lightning, Lockheed U-2, Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird
Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird
and other Lockheed aircraft.[2] The F-104 set numerous world records, including both airspeed and altitude records
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Prototype
A prototype is an early sample, model, or release of a product built to test a concept or process or to act as a thing to be replicated or learned from.[1] It is a term used in a variety of contexts, including semantics, design, electronics, and software programming. A prototype is generally used to evaluate a new design to enhance precision by system analysts and users.[2] Prototyping serves to provide specifications for a real, working system rather than a theoretical one.[3] In some design workflow models, creating a prototype (a process sometimes called materialization) is the step between the formalization and the evaluation of an idea.[4] The word prototype derives from the Greek πρωτότυπον prototypon, "primitive form", neutral of πρωτότυπος prototypos, "original, primitive", from πρῶτος protos, "first" and τύπος typos, "impression".[1][5]Contents1 Basic prototype categories 2 Differences in creating a prototype vs
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Sukhoi Su-7
The Sukhoi
Sukhoi
Su-7 (NATO designation name: Fitter-A) was a swept wing, supersonic fighter aircraft developed by the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
in 1955. Originally, it was designed as tactical, low-level dogfighter, but was not successful in this role. On the other hand, the soon-introduced Su-7B series became the main Soviet fighter-bomber and ground-attack aircraft of the 1960s
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Longitudinal Static Stability
In flight dynamics, longitudinal static stability is the stability of an aircraft in the longitudinal, or pitching, plane under steady flight conditions
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Climb Rate
In aeronautics, the rate of climb (RoC) is an aircraft's vertical speed – the rate of positive altitude change with respect to time or distance.[1] In most ICAO
ICAO
member countries, even in otherwise metric countries, this is usually expressed in feet per minute (ft/min). Elsewhere, it is commonly expressed in metre per second (m/s). The rate of climb in an aircraft is indicated with a vertical speed indicator (VSI) or instantaneous vertical speed indicator (IVSI). The rate of decrease in altitude is referred to as the rate of descent (RoD) or sink rate. A decrease in altitude corresponds with a negative rate of climb. Speed and rate of climb[edit] There are a number of designated airspeeds relating to optimum rates of ascent, the two most important of these are VX and VY. VX is the indicated forward airspeed for best angle of climb
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General Dynamics F-16 Fighting Falcon
The General Dynamics
General Dynamics
F-16
F-16
Fighting Falcon is a single-engine supersonic multirole fighter aircraft originally developed by General Dynamics (now Lockheed Martin) for the United States Air Force
United States Air Force
(USAF). Designed as an air superiority day fighter, it evolved into a successful all-weather multirole aircraft. Over 4,500 aircraft have been built since production was approved in 1976.[4] Although no longer being purchased by the U.S
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Korean War
Military stalemateNorth Korean invasion of South Korea
South Korea
repelled Subsequent U.S.-led United Nations
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Fuselage
The fuselage (/ˈfjuːzəlɑːʒ/; from the French fuselé "spindle-shaped") is an aircraft's main body section. It holds crew, passengers, and cargo. In single-engine aircraft it will usually contain an engine, as well, although in some amphibious aircraft the single engine is mounted on a pylon attached to the fuselage, which in turn is used as a floating hull
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Balalaika
The balalaika (Russian: балала́йка, pronounced [bəɫɐˈɫajkə]) is a Russian stringed musical instrument with a characteristic triangular wooden, hollow body and three strings. Two strings are usually tuned to the same note and the third string is a perfect fourth higher. The higher-pitched balalaikas are used to play melodies and chords. The instrument generally has a short sustain, necessitating rapid strumming or plucking when it is used to play melodies. Balalaikas are often used for Russian folk music and dancing. The balalaika family of instruments includes instruments of various sizes, from the highest-pitched to the lowest: the piccolo balalaika, prima balalaika, secunda balalaika, alto balalaika, bass balalaika, and contrabass balalaika. There are balalaika orchestras which consist solely of different balalaikas; these ensembles typically play Classical music that has been arranged for balalaikas. The prima balalaika is the most common; the piccolo is rare
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Afterburner (engine)
An afterburner (or a reheat) is a component present on some jet engines, mostly those used on military supersonic aircraft. Its purpose is to provide an increase in thrust, usually for supersonic flight, takeoff, and combat situations. Afterburning is achieved by injecting additional fuel into the jet pipe downstream of (i.e. after) the turbine
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