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Midland Railway
The Midland Railway
Railway
(MR) was a railway company in the United Kingdom from 1844[1] to 1922, when it became part of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway.[2] It had a large network of lines managed from its headquarters in Derby. It became the third-largest railway undertaking in the British Isles (after the Great Western Railway
Railway
and the London and North Western Railway).[3]Contents1 Origins 2 Consolidation 3 The South-West 4 Eastern competition 5 The Battle of Nottingham 6 The Euston Square Confederacy 7 To London7.1 King's Cross 1857 – 1868 7.2 St
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Northern And Eastern Railway
The Northern & Eastern Railway was an early British railway company, that planned to build a line from London to York. Its ambition was cut successively back, and it only constructed from Stratford, London
Stratford, London
to Bishop's Stortford
Bishop's Stortford
and Hertford. It was always short of money, and it got access to London over the Eastern Counties Railway. It was built at the track gauge of five feet, but it converted to standard gauge in 1844. Its main line opened progressively from 1840 to 1842. It was worked by the neighbouring Eastern Counties Railway, and it leased its network to that company in from the beginning of 1844 for 999 years
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1922 In Rail Transport
This article lists events related to rail transport that occurred in 1922.Contents1 Events1.1 May events 1.2 July events 1.3 August events 1.4 October events 1.5 November events 1.6 December events 1.7 Unknown date events2 Births2.1 March births 2.2 July births 2.3 Unknown date births3 Deaths 4 ReferencesEvents[edit] May events[edit]May 17 – The Arkansas Short Line Railroad, a predecessor of St. Louis Southwestern Railway, is incorporated.[1]July events[edit]July 1 – The Great Railroad Strike of 1922 begins in the United States, coinciding with a reduction in railroad shop wages by seven cents per day mandated by the Railroad Labor Board. Continues until September 1.[2]August events[edit]August 31 – H. L
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Chesterfield
Chesterfield
Chesterfield
is a market town and borough in Derbyshire, England.[1] It lies 24 miles (39 km) north of Derby
Derby
and 11 miles (18 km) south of Sheffield
Sheffield
at the confluence of the rivers Rother and Hipper. Including Whittington, Brimington
Brimington
and Staveley it had a population of about 103,800 in 2011,[2] making it the second largest town in the ceremonial county after Derby. Archaeologists trace it back to a Roman fort built in the 1st century AD,[3] but soon abandoned. Later an Anglo-Saxon village developed. The name derives from the Old English ceaster (a Roman fort) and feld (grazing land).[4][5] It has a street market of some 250 stalls three days a week.[6] The town sits on a coalfield, which was economically important until the 1980s. Little visual evidence of mining remains
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Long Eaton
Long Eaton
Long Eaton
is a town in the Erewash
Erewash
district of Derbyshire, England. It lies just north of the River Trent
River Trent
about 7 miles (11 km) southwest of Nottingham
Nottingham
and is part of the Nottingham
Nottingham
Urban Area (the conurbation around Nottingham) but not part of the City of Nottingham. The population of the town was 37,760 at the 2011 census.[1] The town is 9 miles east of the city of Derby. Since 1 April 1974, Long Eaton has been part of Erewash
Erewash
borough.Contents1 History 2 Twin towns 3 Notable architecture 4 Transport 5 County issues 6 Schools 7 Brass band 8 Sport 9 Notable people 10 See also 11 References 12 Gallery 13 External linksHistory[edit] Long Eaton
Long Eaton
is referred to as Aitone, in the Domesday Book
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Sheffield
Sheffield
Sheffield
(/ˈʃɛfiːəld/ ( listen)) is a city and metropolitan borough in South Yorkshire, England. Historically part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, its name derives from the River Sheaf, which runs through the city. With some of its southern suburbs annexed from Derbyshire, the city has grown from its largely industrial roots to encompass a wider economic base. The population of the City of Sheffield
Sheffield
is 575,400 (mid-2016 est.)[2] and it is one of the eight largest regional English cities that make up the Core Cities Group.[3] Sheffield
Sheffield
is the third largest English district by population. The metropolitan population of Sheffield
Sheffield
is 1,569,000.[1] The city is in the eastern foothills of the Pennines, and the valleys of the River Don and its four tributaries, the Loxley, the Porter Brook, the Rivelin and the Sheaf
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Bristol
Urban Chris Skidmore
Chris Skidmore
(Con) Jack Lopresti
Jack Lopresti
(Con)Area •&#
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Nottinghamshire
Coordinates: 53°10′N 1°00′W / 53.167°N 1.000°W / 53.167; -1.000This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Leicestershire
Leicestershire (/ˈlɛstərʃər, -ʃɪər/ ( listen); abbreviation Leics.) is a landlocked county in the English Midlands. The county borders Nottinghamshire to the north, Lincolnshire to the north-east, Rutland to the east, Northamptonshire to the south-east, Warwickshire to the south-west, Staffordshire to the west, and Derbyshire to the north-west. The border with most of Warwickshire is Watling Street (the A5). Leicestershire takes its name from the city of Leicester (unitary authority) located at its centre and administered separately from the rest of the county. The ceremonial county (non-metropolitan county plus the city of Leicester) has a total population of just over 1 million (2016 estimate), more than half of which (c
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London And Birmingham Railway
Birmingham
Birmingham
(/ˈbɜːrmɪŋəm/ ( listen),[3] locally /-mɪŋ(ɡ)əm, -mɪnəm/) is a city and metropolitan borough in the West Midlands of England, standing on the River Rea
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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Standard Gauge
North America · South America · Europe · Australiav t eA standard-gauge railway is a railway with a track gauge of 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 1⁄2 in). The standard gauge is also called Stephenson gauge after George Stephenson, International gauge, UIC gauge, uniform gauge, normal gauge and European gauge in the EU and Russia.[1][2][3][4][5] It is the most widely used railway track gauge across the world with approximately 55% of the lines in the world using it. All high-speed rail lines, except those in Russia, Finland, Portugal and Uzbekistan, utilise standard gauge
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Emblem
An emblem is an abstract or representational pictorial image that represents a concept, like a moral truth, or an allegory, or a person, like a king or saint.[1]Contents1 Emblems vs. symbols 2 Other terminology 3 Emblems in history 4 Emblems in speech4.1 Emblems vs. sign language5 Emblems in culture 6 See also 7 References7.1 Further reading8 Notes 9 External linksEmblems vs. symbols[edit] Although the words emblem and symbol are often used interchangeably, an emblem is a pattern that is used to represent an idea or an individual. An emblem crystallizes in concrete, visual terms some abstraction: a deity, a tribe or nation, or a virtue or vice.[clarification needed] An emblem may be worn or otherwise used as an identifying badge or patch. For example, in America, police officers' badges refer to their personal metal emblem whereas their woven emblems on uniforms identify members of a particular unit
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Track Gauge
North America · South America · Europe · Australiav t ePart of a series onRail transportOperations Track Maintenance High-speed railways Track gauge Stations Trains Locomotives Rolling stock Companies History Attractions Terminology (AU, NA, NZ, UK) By country Accidents Railway couplings Couplers by country Coupler conversion Track gauge Variable gauge Gauge conversion Dual gauge Wheelset Bogie
Bogie
(truck) Dual coupling Rail subsidiesModellingv t eIn rail transport, track gauge is the spacing of the rails on a railway track and is measured between the inner faces of the load-bearing rails. All vehicles on a rail network must have running gear that is compatible with the track gauge, and in the earliest days of railways the selection of a proposed railway's gauge was a key issue
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Broad Gauge
North America · South America · Europe · Australiav t eA broad-gauge railway is a railway with a track gauge broader than the 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 1⁄2 in) standard-gauge railways.Contents1 History 2 Gauges2.1 5 ft and 1520 mm gauge 2.2 5 ft 3 in gauge 2.3 Iberian gauge 2.4 5 ft 6 in gauge 2.5 Broader gauges3 Cultural references 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] See also: Regulating the Gauge of Railways Act 1846Great Western Railway
Railway
broad-gauge steam locomotives awai
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Railway
Rail transport
Rail transport
is a means of transferring of passengers and goods on wheeled vehicles running on rails, also known as tracks. It is also commonly referred to as train transport. In contrast to road transport, where vehicles run on a prepared flat surface, rail vehicles (rolling stock) are directionally guided by the tracks on which they run. Tracks usually consist of steel rails, installed on ties (sleepers) and ballast, on which the rolling stock, usually fitted with metal wheels, moves
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