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Middlemores Saddles
Middlemores Saddles was a horse saddles and accessories company based in Birmingham, England, with origins dating to the early nineteenth century. After several name changes they ended their time as a bicycle saddle and accessories company in Coventry
Coventry
in the late twentieth century.[1] The company had a trading period that can be documented to at least 160 years; making it one of the most longevous companies to operate in England.[2][3] History[edit] The origins of Middlemores Saddles go back to when Richard Middlemore had a company at 31 Holloway Head, Birmingham
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Ticker Symbol
A ticker symbol or stock symbol is an abbreviation used to uniquely identify publicly traded shares of a particular stock on a particular stock market. A stock symbol may consist of letters, numbers or a combination of both. "Ticker symbol" refers to the symbols that were printed on the ticker tape of a ticker tape machine.Contents1 Interpreting the symbol1.1 Other identifiers 1.2 Symbol for stock market indices2 Symbols by country2.1 Canada 2.2 United Kingdom 2.3 United States2.3.1 Single-letter ticker symbols2.4 Other countries3 See also 4 ReferencesInterpreting the symbol[edit] Stock
Stock
symbols are unique identifiers assigned to each security traded on a particular market. For example, AAPL is for Apple Inc.; OODH is for Orion DHC, Inc.; and HD is for Home Depot, Inc. A stock symbol can consist of letters, numbers, or a combination of both, and is a way to uniquely identify that stock
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Mountain Climber
This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Bicycle Saddles
A bicycle saddle, often called a seat,[1] is one of three contact points on an upright bicycle, the others being the pedals and the handlebars
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Historic Scotland
Historic Scotland
Scotland
(Scottish Gaelic: Alba Aosmhor) was an executive agency of the Scottish Government
Scottish Government
from 1991 to 2015, responsible for safeguarding Scotland's built heritage, and promoting its understanding and enjoyment. Under the terms of a Bill of the Scottish Parliament published on 3 March 2014, Historic Scotland
Scotland
was dissolved and its functions were transferred to Historic Environment Scotland (HES) on 1 October 2015. HES also took over the functions of the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland.[1][2]Contents1 Role 2 Properties 3 Membership 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksRole[edit] Historic Scotland
Scotland
was a successor organisation to the Ancient Monuments Division of the Ministry of Works and the Scottish Development Department
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Watson-Guptill Publications
Watson-Guptill is an American publisher of instructional books in the arts.[1] The company was founded in 1937 by Ernest Watson, Ralph Reinhold, and Arthur L. Guptill.[2] They also published the magazine American Artist.[3] Their headquarters are at 1745 Broadway, New York City, Random House Tower.[4] Billboard Publications acquired Watson-Guptill in 1962.[citation needed] The Dutch publisher VNU (later renamed the Nielsen Company) acquired Billboard in 1993.[5] Random House acquired Watson-Guptill from Nielsen in 2008.[6] Five years later, Random House, which was owned by Bertelsmann and the Penguin Group, owned by Pearson PLC, merged to form the Penguin Random House company.[7][8] Imprints[edit]Amphoto Books Backstage Books Billboard BooksExternal links[edit]Official website Watson BiographyReferences[edit]^ "Watson-Guptill – The Crown Publishing Group". CrownPublishing.com. Retrieved 2015-08-15.  ^ "Ernest W. Watson Biography". ernestwwatson.com
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New York City
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor Bill de Blasio
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Adrian Tinniswood
Adrian John Tinniswood OBE (born 1954) is an English writer and historian. Tinniswood studied English and Philosophy
Philosophy
at Southampton University and was awarded an MPhil at Leicester University
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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London Gazette
The London Gazette
The London Gazette
is one of the official journals of record of the British government, and the most important among such official journals in the United Kingdom, in which certain statutory notices are required to be published. The London Gazette
The London Gazette
claims to be the oldest surviving English newspaper and the oldest continuously published newspaper in the UK, having been first published on 7 November 1665 as The Oxford
Oxford
Gazette.[a][2] This claim is also made by the Stamford Mercury and Berrow's Worcester Journal, because The Gazette is not a conventional newspaper offering general news coverage
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The Free Library
A library is a collection of sources of information and similar resources, made accessible to a defined community for reference or borrowing.[1] It provides physical or digital access to material, and may be a physical building or room, or a virtual space, or both.[2] A library's collection can include books, periodicals, newspapers, manuscripts, films, maps, prints, documents, microform, CDs, cassettes, videotapes, DVDs, Blu-ray
Blu-ray
Discs, e-books, audiobooks, databases, and other formats. Libraries range in size from a few shelves of books to several million items. In Latin and Greek, the idea of a bookcase is represented by Bibliotheca and Bibliothēkē (Greek: βιβλιοθήκη): derivatives of these mean library in many modern languages, e.g. French bibliothèque. The first libraries consisted of archives of the earliest form of writing—the clay tablets in cuneiform script discovered in Sumer, some dating back to 2600 BC
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Liquidation
In United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland
Republic of Ireland
and United States
United States
law and business, liquidation is the process by which a company is brought to an end. The assets and property of the company are redistributed. Liquidation is also sometimes referred to as winding-up or dissolution, although dissolution technically refers to the last stage of liquidation
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Orkney Islands
Orkney
Orkney
/ˈɔːrkni/ (Old Norse: Orkneyjar, Pictish: Insi Orc, "islands of the pigs"), also known as the Orkney
Orkney
Islands,[Notes 1] is an archipelago in the Northern Isles
Northern Isles
of Scotland, situated off the north coast of Great Britain. Orkney
Orkney
is 16 kilometres (10 mi) north of the coast of Caithness
Caithness
and comprises approximately 70 islands, of which 20 are inhabited.[2][3][4] The largest island, Mainland, is often referred to as "the Mainland"
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Bicycle
A bicycle, also called a cycle or bike, is a human-powered, pedal-driven, single-track vehicle, having two wheels attached to a frame, one behind the other. A bicycle rider is called a cyclist, or bicyclist. Bicycles were introduced in the late 19th century in Europe, and by the early 21st century, more than 1 billion have been produced worldwide.[1][2][3] These numbers far exceed the number of cars, both in total and ranked by the number of individual models produced.[4][5][6] They are the principal means of transportation in many regions
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Horse Saddles
The saddle is a supportive structure for a rider or other load, fastened to an animal's back by a girth. The most common type is the equestrian saddle designed for a horse. However, specialized saddles have been created for camels and other creatures.[1][2] It is not known precisely when riders first began to use some sort of padding or protection, but a blanket attached by some form of surcingle or girth was probably the first "saddle," followed later by more elaborate padded designs. The solid saddle tree was a later invention, and though early stirrup designs predated the invention of the solid tree, the paired stirrup, which attached to the tree, was the last element of the saddle to reach the basic form that is still used today. Today, modern saddles come in a wide variety of styles, each designed for a specific equestrianism discipline, and require careful fit to both the rider and the horse
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