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Tushratta
Tushratta or Tyshratha / Thesh·ratha (Sanskrit Tveṣa-ratha, "his chariot charges")[1] was a king of Mitanni at the end of the reign of Amenhotep III and throughout the reign of Akhenaten—approximately the late 14th century BC. He was the son of Shuttarna II. His sister Gilukhipa and his daughter Tadukhipa were married to the Egyptian pharaoh Amenhotep III;[2] Tadukhipa later married Akhenaten who took over his father's royal harem. He had been placed on the throne after the murder of his brother Artashumara
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Akhenaten

The unconventional portrayals of Akhenaten – different from the traditional athletic norm in the portrayal of pharaohs – have led Egyptologists in the 19th and 20th centuries to suppose that Akhenaten suffered some kind of genetic abnormality.[218] Various illnesses have been put forward, with Frölich's syndrome or Marfan syndrome being mentioned most commonly.[242] Cyril Aldred,[243] following up earlier arguments of Grafton Elliot Smith[244] and James Strachey,[245] suggested that Akhenaten may have suffered from Frölich's syndrome on the basis of his long jaw and his feminine appearance. However, this is unlikely, because this disorder results in sterility and Akhenaten is known to have fathered numerous children
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Amarna Period
The Amarna Period was an era of Egyptian history during the later half of the Eighteenth Dynasty when the royal residence of the pharaoh and his queen was shifted to Akhetaten ('Horizon of the Aten') in what is now Amarna. It was marked by the reign of Amenhotep IV, who changed his name to Akhenaten (1353–1336 BC) in order to reflect the dramatic change of Egypt's polytheistic religion into one where the sun disc Aten was worshipped over all other gods. The Egyptian pantheon was restored under Akhenaten's successor, Tutankhamun. The ruins of Akhetaten. Now commonly called Amarna, Akhenaten's capital city was abandoned by Tutankhamun
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Amarna Letters
The Amarna letters (/əˈmɑːr-nə/; sometimes referred to as the Amarna correspondence or Amarna tablets, and cited with the abbreviation EA, for "El Amarna") are an archive, written on clay tablets, primarily consisting of diplomatic correspondence between the Egyptian administration and its representatives in Canaan and Amurru, or neighboring kingdom leaders, during the New Kingdom, between c. 1360–1332 BC (see here for dates). The letters were found in Upper Egypt at el-Amarna, the modern name for the ancient Egyptian capital of Akhetaten, founded by pharaoh Akhenaten (1350s–1330s BC) during the Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt
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Suppiluliumas
Suppiluliuma I (/ˌsʌpɪlʌliˈmə/) or Suppiluliumas I (/-məs/)[1] was king of the Hittites (r. c. 1344–1322 BC (short chronology)). He achieved fame as a great warrior and statesman, successfully challenging the then-dominant Egyptian empire for control of the lands between the Mediterranean and the Euphrates. Deeds of Suppiluliuma Reads: http://ancienegypte.fr/istanbul/traduction_tablettes/image6.jpg "In relating the wars of his father Suppiluliuma I and his victories the Hittite king Mursili II mentions that after the death of the king of Egypt Tutankamon, Queen Dahamunzu (Ankhesenamun) asked his father to send a prince to become her husband and king from the country
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Zagros
The Zagros Mountains (Persian: کوه‌های زاگرس‎; Kurdish: چیاکانی زاگرۆس ,Çiyayên Zagros‎;[2][3] Lurish: کۆیَل زاگروس)[citation needed] are a long mountain range in Iran, Iraq and southeastern Turkey. This mountain range has a total length of 1,600 km (990 mi). The Zagros mountain range begins in northwestern Iran and roughly follows Iran's western border, while covering much of southeastern Turkey and northeastern Iraq. From this border region, the range roughly follows Iran's coast on the Persian Gulf. It spans the whole length of the western and southwestern Iranian plateau, ending at the Strait of Hormuz
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Carchemish

Carchemish (/ˈkɑːrkəmɪʃ/ KAR-kəm-ish or //ˈkɑːrkəmɪʃ/ KAR-kəm-ish or /kɑːrˈkmɪʃ/ kar-KEE-mish[1][2]), also spelled Karkemish (Hittite: Karkamiš;[3] Turkish: Karkamış; Hebrew: כַּרְכְּמְישׂ‎; Greek: Εὔρωπος, Europos; Latin: Europus) was an important ancient capital in the northern part of the region of Syria
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