HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Microculture
Microculture refers to the specialised subgroups, marked with their own languages, ethos and rule expectations, that permeate differentiated industrial societies.[1] A microculture depends on the smallest units of organization – dyads, groups, or local communities – as opposed to the broader subcultures of race or class, and the wider national/global culture, compared to which they tend also to be more short-lived, as well as voluntarily chosen.[2] The study of kinesics – the nonverbal behavior of the small gathering – can be used to illuminate the dynamics of a given microculture.[3]Contents1 Precursors 2 Microclimate 3 Microculture/mainstream 4 Online microcultures 5 Field research 6 Literary examples 7 See also 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksPrecursors[edit]
[...More...]

"Microculture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ethos
Ethos
Ethos
(/ˈiːθɒs/ or US: /ˈiːθoʊs/) is a Greek word meaning "character" that is used to describe the guiding beliefs or ideals that characterize a community, nation, or ideology. The Greeks also used this word to refer to the power of music to influence emotions, behaviours, and even morals.[1] Early Greek stories of Orpheus
Orpheus
exhibit this idea in a compelling way
[...More...]

"Ethos" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Micromarketing
Micromarketing was first referred to in the UK marketing press in November 1988 in respect of the application of geodemographics to consumer marketing.[1] The subject of micromarketing was developed further in an article in February 1990, which emphasised understanding markets at the local level, and also the personalisation of messages to individual consumers in the context direct marketing.[2] Micromarketing has come to refer to marketing strategies which are variously customised to either local markets, to different market segments, or to the individual customer. Micromarketing is a marketing strategy in which marketing and/or advertising efforts are focused on a small group of tightly targeted consumers. For example, markets can be grouped into narrow clusters based on commitment to a product class or readiness to purchase a given brand
[...More...]

"Micromarketing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Culturomics
Culturomics
Culturomics
is a form of computational lexicology that studies human behavior and cultural trends through the quantitative analysis of digitized texts.[1][2] Researchers data mine large digital archives to investigate cultural phenomena reflected in language and word usage.[3] The term is an American neologism first described in a 2010 Science article called Quantitative Analysis of Culture Using Millions of Digitized Books, co-authored by Harvard researchers Jean-Baptiste Michel and Erez Lieberman Aiden.[4] Michel and Aiden helped create the
[...More...]

"Culturomics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Cross-cultural Psychiatry
Cross-cultural psychiatry (also known as transcultural psychiatry or cultural psychiatry) is a branch of psychiatry concerned with the cultural context of mental disorders and the challenges of addressing ethnic diversity in psychiatric services. It emerged as a coherent field from several strands of work, including surveys of the prevalence and form of disorders in different cultures or countries; the study of migrant populations and ethnic diversity within countries; and analysis of psychiatry itself as a cultural product.[1] The early literature was associated with colonialism and with observations by asylum psychiatrists or anthropologists who tended to assume the universal applicability of Western psychiatric diagnostic categories. A seminal paper by Arthur Kleinman
Arthur Kleinman
in 1977[2] followed by a renewed dialogue between anthropology and psychiatry, is seen as having heralded a "new cross-cultural psychiatry"
[...More...]

"Cross-cultural Psychiatry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Cross-cultural Leadership
Cross-cultural psychology
Cross-cultural psychology
attempts to understand how individuals of different cultures interact with each other.[1] Along these lines, cross-cultural leadership has developed as a way to understand leaders who work in the newly globalized market
[...More...]

"Cross-cultural Leadership" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cross-cultural Communication
Cross-cultural communication is a field of study that looks at how people from differing cultural backgrounds communicate, in similar and different ways among themselves, and how they endeavour to communicate across cultures. Intercultural communication
Intercultural communication
is a related field of study.[1]Contents1 Origins and culture 2 Interdisciplinary orientation 3 Global rise 4 Incorporation into college programs 5 International educational organizations5.1 WYSE International 5.2 MEET - Middle East Education through Technology6 Aspects 7 Differences between Western communication and traditional Indigenous communication 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksOrigins and culture[edit] During the Cold War, the economy of the United States was largely self-contained because the world was polarized into two separate and competing powers: the East and the West
[...More...]

"Cross-cultural Communication" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Bioculture
Bioculture is the combination of biological and cultural factors that affect human behavior.[1] Bioculture is an area of study bounded by the medical sciences, social sciences, landscape ecology, cultural anthropology, biotechnology, disability studies, the humanities, and the economic and global environment. Along these lines, one can see the biosphere — the earth as it is affected by the human — as the adaptation of the natural to the human and biocultures as the inter-adaptation of the human to the new technologies and ways of knowing characterized by the 21st century’s attitude toward the body. It assumes that in bioculture there's a diverse way to know the workings of the body and mind, and that these are primarily culturally derived, and an expert's way of knowing produces specific strong results. However the results do not have an exclusive purview over the body and mind
[...More...]

"Bioculture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Dyad (sociology)
In sociology, a dyad (from Greek δύο dýo, "two" or Sanskrit दयाद "Dayadaha") is a group of two people, the smallest possible social group. As an adjective, "dyadic" describes their interaction. The pair of individuals in a dyad can be linked via romantic interest, family relation, interests, work, partners in crime, and so on. The relation can be based on equality, but may be based on an asymmetrical or hierarchical relationship (master–servant). The strength of the relationship is evaluated on the basis of time the individuals spend together, as well as on the emotional intensity of their relationship. A dyad can be unstable because both persons must cooperate to make it work. If one of the two fails to complete their duties, the group would fall apart. Because of the significance of marriages in society, their stability is very important
[...More...]

"Dyad (sociology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
is a digital archive of the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and other information on the Internet
Internet
created by the Internet
Internet
Archive, a nonprofit organization, based in San Francisco, California, United States.Contents1 History 2 Technical details2.1 Storage capabilities 2.2 Growth 2.3 Website exclusion policy2.3.1 Oakland Archive
Archive
Policy3 Uses3.1 In legal evidence3.1.1 Civil litigation3.1.1.1 Netbula LLC v. Chordiant Software Inc. 3.1.1.2 Telewizja Polska3.1.2 Patent law 3.1.3 Limitations of utility4 Legal status 5 Archived content legal issues5.1 Scientology 5.2 Healthcare Advocates, Inc. 5.3 Suzanne Shell 5.4 Daniel Davydiuk6 Censorship and other threats 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
[...More...]

"Wayback Machine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Symbolic Boundaries
Symbolic boundaries are a theory of how people form social groups proposed by cultural sociologists. Symbolic boundaries are “conceptual distinctions made by social actors…that separate people into groups and generate feelings of similarity and group membership.”[1] Symbolic boundaries are a necessary but insufficient condition for social change
[...More...]

"Symbolic Boundaries" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Social Identity
In psychology, identity is the qualities, beliefs, personality, looks and/or expressions that make a person (self-identity) or group (particular social category or social group). The process of identity can be creative or destructive.[1] A psychological identity relates to self-image (one's mental model of oneself), self-esteem, and individuality
[...More...]

"Social Identity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Reference Group
A reference group is a group to which an individual or another group is compared. Sociologists call any group that individuals use as a standard for evaluating themselves and their own behavior a reference group. Reference groups are used in order to evaluate and determine the nature of a given individual or other group's characteristics and sociological attributes. It is the group to which the individual relates or aspires to relate himself or herself psychologically. It becomes the individual's frame of reference and source for ordering his or her experiences, perceptions, cognition, and ideas of self. It is important for determining a person's self-identity, attitudes, and social ties. It becomes the basis of reference in making comparisons or contrasts and in evaluating one's appearance and performance. Reference groups provide the benchmarks and contrast needed for comparison and evaluation of group and personal characteristics. Robert K. Merton
Robert K

[...More...]

"Reference Group" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Proxemics
Proxemics
Proxemics
is the study of human use of space and the effects that population density has on behaviour, communication, and social interaction.[1] Proxemics
Proxemics
is one among several subcategories in the study of nonverbal communication, including haptics (touch), kinesics (body movement), vocalics (paralanguage), and chronemics (structure of time).[2] Edward T. Hall, the cultural anthropologist who coined the term in 1963, defined proxemics as "the interrelated observations and theories of humans use of space as a specialized elaboration of culture".[3] In his foundational work on proxemics, The Hidden Dimension, Hall emphasized the impact of proxemic behavior (the use of space) on interpersonal communication
[...More...]

"Proxemics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Intercultural Learning
Intercultural learning is an area of research, study and application of knowledge about different cultures, their differences and similarities. On the one hand, it includes a theoretical and academic approach (see e.g. "Developmental Model of Intercultural Sensitivity (DMIS)" by Milton Bennett, Dimensions of Culture
Culture
by Geert Hofstede). On the other hand, it comprises practical applications such as learning to negotiate with people from different cultures, living with people from different cultures, living in a different culture and the prospect of peace between different cultures. Currently, intercultural learning is a topic which receives much interest. This is mainly due to the rise of cultural studies and globalization. Culture
Culture
has become an instrument for social interpretation and communicative action
[...More...]

"Intercultural Learning" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Night Watch (Russian Novel)
Night Watch (Russian: «Ночной Дозор») is the first fantasy novel by the Russian author Sergei Lukyanenko
Sergei Lukyanenko
to feature his fictional world of the Others. Lukyanenko wrote the story in 1998 and the book was first published in Russia by AST in 1998. The story revolves around a confrontation between two opposing supernatural groups (known as "Others"): the Night Watch, an organization dedicated to policing the actions of the Dark Others—and the Day Watch, which polices the actions of the Light Others. The novel is first in a cycle that continues with Day Watch, Twilight Watch, Final Watch, New Watch, and Sixth Watch
[...More...]

"Night Watch (Russian Novel)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.