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Michelozzo
Michelozzo
Michelozzo
di Bartolomeo Michelozzi (1396–1472) was an Italian architect and sculptor. Considered one of the great pioneers of architecture during the Renaissance, Michelozzo
Michelozzo
was a favored Medici architect who was extensively employed by Cosimo de' Medici. He was a pupil of Lorenzo Ghiberti
Lorenzo Ghiberti
in his early years and later collaborated with Donatello. Known primarily for designing Palazzo Medici Riccardi
Palazzo Medici Riccardi
in Florence, he is often overshadowed by his contemporaries Donatello
Donatello
in sculpture and Brunelleschi in architecture
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Palazzo Comunale, San Gimignano
The Palazzo Comunale (Italian: Municipal palace), also known as the Palazzo del Popolo (Italian: People's palace) of San Gimignano
San Gimignano
has been the seat of the civic authority in the comune since the 13th century. It is located on the Piazza del Duomo close to the Collegiate Church of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary
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Via Camillo Cavour
Coordinates: 43°46′33.68″N 11°15′24.74″E / 43.7760222°N 11.2568722°E / 43.7760222; 11.2568722This article may be expanded with text translated from the corresponding article in Italian. (January 2009) Click [show] for important translation instructions.View a machine-translated version of the Italian article. Google's machine translation is a useful starting point for translations, but translators must revise errors as necessary and confirm that the translation is accurate, rather than simply copy-pasting machine-translated text into the English. Do not translate text that appears unreliable or low-quality. If possible, verify the text with references provided in the foreign-language article. You must provide copyright attribution in the edit summary by providing an interlanguage link to the source of your translation
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Niccolò Machiavelli
Niccolò di Bernardo dei Machiavelli (Italian: [nikkoˈlɔ mmakjaˈvɛlli]; 3 May 1469 – 21 June 1527) was an Italian diplomat, politician, historian, philosopher, humanist, and writer of the Renaissance
Renaissance
period.[1][2] He has often been called the father of modern political science.[3] For many years he was a senior official in the Florentine Republic, with responsibilities in diplomatic and military affairs. He also wrote comedies, carnival songs, and poetry. His personal correspondence is renowned by Italian scholars. He was secretary to the Second Chancery of the Republic
Republic
of Florence
Florence
from 1498 to 1512, when the Medici
Medici
were out of power
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Platonic Academy (Florence)
Plato's influence on Western culture was so profound that several different concepts are linked by being called "Platonic" or Platonist, for accepting some assumptions of Platonism, but which do not imply acceptance of that philosophy as a whole. Platonic can refer to: Platonic love, a relationship that is not sexual in nature Platonic forms, or the Theory of Forms, Plato's model of existence Platonic idealism
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Mugello Region
The Mugello
Mugello
is a historic region and valley in northern Tuscany, in Italy. It is located to the north of the city of Florence
Florence
and includes the northernmost portion of the Metropolitan City of Florence. The Futa Pass
Futa Pass
connects the Mugello
Mugello
valley to the separate Santerno
Santerno
river valley.Contents1 History 2 Present day 3 Towns 4 See alsoHistory[edit] The Mugello
Mugello
valley was settled by a Ligurian tribe known as the Magelli, whence the name. Then the region was occupied by the Etruscans who have left many archeological traces and who built the first road network of the Mugello. The subsequent Ancient Roman conquest and colonization of the Mugello region dates back to the 4th century BCE. It is not only testified by several finds such as tombs, coins, and walls, but also, through toponymy, e.g
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Jerusalem
Jerusalem
Jerusalem
(/dʒəˈruːsələm/; Hebrew: יְרוּשָׁלַיִם‬  Yerushaláyim; Arabic: القُدس‎  al-Quds)[note 2] is a city in the Middle East, located on a plateau in the Judaean Mountains between the Mediterranean and the Dead Sea. It is one of the oldest cities in the world, and is considered holy to the three major Abrahamic religions—Judaism, Christianity
Christianity
and Islam
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Fiesole
Fiesole
Fiesole
(Italian pronunciation: [ˈfjɛːzole]) is a town and comune of the Metropolitan City of Florence
Metropolitan City of Florence
in the Italian region of Tuscany, on a scenic height above Florence, 8 kilometres (5 mi) northeast of that city. The Decameron
Decameron
by Giovanni Boccaccio
Giovanni Boccaccio
is set in the slopes of Fiesole. Both Harvard University
Harvard University
and Georgetown University have their centers of Italian Renaissance Studies domiciled in Fiesole.[1][2] Since the 14th century the city has always been considered a getaway for the upper class of Florence
Florence
and up to this day Fiesole
Fiesole
remains noted for its very expensive residential properties. The city is generally considered to be the wealthiest and most affluent suburb of Florence
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Dominican Order
The Order of Preachers (Latin: Ordo Praedicatorum, postnominal abbreviation O.P.), also known as the Dominican Order, is a mendicant Catholic religious order
Catholic religious order
founded by the Spanish priest Dominic of Caleruega in France, approved by Pope Honorius III
Pope Honorius III
via the Papal bull Religiosam vitam
Religiosam vitam
on 22 December 1216. Members of the order, who are referred to as Dominicans, generally carry the letters O.P. after their names, standing for Ordinis Praedicatorum, meaning of the Order of Preachers
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Gothic Architecture
Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
is an architectural style that flourished in Europe
Europe
during the High and Late Middle Ages. It evolved from Romanesque architecture
Romanesque architecture
and was succeeded by Renaissance
Renaissance
architecture. Originating in 12th century France
France
and lasting into the 16th century, Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
was known during the period as Opus Francigenum ("French work") with the term Gothic first appearing during the later part of the Renaissance. Its characteristics include the pointed arch, the ribbed vault (which evolved from the joint vaulting of Romanesque architecture) and the flying buttress. Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
is most familiar as the architecture of many of the great cathedrals, abbeys and churches of Europe
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San Giorgio Monastery
The San Giorgio Monastery
Monastery
(English: St. George Monastery) was a Benedictine monastery in Venice, Italy, located on the island of San Giorgio Maggiore. It stands next to the Church of San Giorgio Maggiore, which formerly served the monastic community, and currently serves as the headquarters of the Cini Foundation.Contents1 History of the monastery1.1 Foundation 1.2 Prestige 1.3 The decline2 Revival 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory of the monastery[edit] Foundation[edit] The monastery was founded in AD 982 following the donation of the island by the Doge Tribuno Memmo in response to a request by the Blessed John Morosini, O.S.B., who wished to establish a monastery there, and who then became the first abbot. Among the first monks of the community which developed there was St
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Sagrestia Vecchia
The Sagrestia Vecchia, or Old Sacristy, is a Christian building in Florence, Italy, one of the most important monuments of the early Italian Renaissance architecture. It is accessed from the inside of San Lorenzo[1] off the left transept. Designed by Filippo Brunelleschi and paid for by the Medici
Medici
family,[2] who also used it for their tombs, it set the tone for the development of a new style of architecture that was built around proportion, the unity of elements, and the use of the classical orders. The space came to be called the “Old Sacristy” after a new one was begun in 1510 on the other side of S
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Melozzo
Melozzo da Forlì
Forlì
(c. 1438 – 8 November 1494) was an Italian Renaissance painter and architect. His fresco paintings are notable for the use of foreshortening. He was the most important member of the Forlì
Forlì
painting school.Contents1 Biography 2 Legacy 3 References 4 NotesBiography[edit] Melozzo was supposedly from a wealthy family named Ambrosi from Forlì. Nothing is known about his early years. It is only a hypothesis[1] that he was formed by the Forlivese school of art, then dominated by Ansuino da Forlì; both were influenced by Andrea Mantegna. It has been said, also without confirmation, that he became a journeyman and color-grinder to master painters. His presence was first mentioned in his birthplace in 1460 and again in 1464
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Pope John XXIII
Pope
Pope
Saint
Saint
John XXIII (Latin: Ioannes; Italian: Giovanni; born Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli, Italian pronunciation: [ˈandʒelo dʒuˈzɛppe roŋˈkalli]; 25 November 1881 – 3 June 1963) was head of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
and ruler of the Vatican City
Vatican City
State from 28 October 1958 to his death in 1963 and was canonized on 27 April 2014.[7] Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli was the fourth of fourteen children born to a family of sharecroppers who lived in a village in Lombardy.[8] He was ordained to the priesthood on 10 August 1904 and served in a number of posts, as nuncio in France and a delegate to Bulgaria, Greece
Greece
and Turkey
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Santa Trinita
Santa Trinita
Santa Trinita
(pronounced [ˈsanta ˈtriːnita]; Italian for "Holy Trinity") is a Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
church located in front of the Piazza of the same name, traversed by Via de' Tornabuoni, in central Florence, region of Tuscany, Italy
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John The Baptist
John the Baptist
John the Baptist
(Hebrew: יוחנן המטביל‎, Ancient Greek: Ἰωάννης ὁ βαπτιστής, Iōánnēs ho baptistḗs or Ἰωάννης ὁ βαπτίζων, Iōánnēs ho baptízōn,[5][6][7][8][9], Coptic: ⲓⲱⲁⲛⲛⲏⲥ ⲡⲓⲡⲣⲟⲇⲣⲟⲙⲟⲥ or ⲓⲱ̅ⲁ ⲡⲓⲣϥϯⲱⲙⲥ[10], Arabic: يحيى‎, translit. Yaḥyā[11]) was a Jewish
Jewish
itinerant preacher[12] in the early first century AD. John is revered as a major religious figure[13] in Christianity, Islam, the Bahá'í Faith,[14] and Mandaeism. He is called a prophet by all of these traditions, and is honored as a saint in many Christian
Christian
traditions. Other titles for John include John the Forerunner in Eastern Christianity
Christianity
and "the prophet John" (Yaḥyā) in Islam
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