HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Methylestradiol
METHYLESTRADIOL, or 17α-METHYLESTRADIOL (17α-ME), is a semisynthetic , steroidal estrogen that has been sold in combination with normethandrone (methylestrenolone), an anabolic-androgenic steroid and progestin and , under brand names including GINECOSID, GINECOSIDE, MEDIOL, RENODIOL for the treatment of menopausal symptoms in Brazil
Brazil
, Venezuela
Venezuela
, and Indonesia
Indonesia
. Due to the presence of the 17α-methyl group, methylestradiol cannot be deactivated by oxidation of the 17β-hydroxy group, resulting in improved metabolic stability and potency relative to estradiol analogously to ethinylestradiol (17α-ethynylestradiol). In addition to its clinical use, methylestradiol has been studied as a radiopharmaceutical
[...More...]

"Methylestradiol" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Potency (pharmacology)
In the field of pharmacology , POTENCY is a measure of drug activity expressed in terms of the amount required to produce an effect of given intensity. A highly potent drug (e.g., fentanyl , alprazolam , risperidone ) evokes a given response at low concentrations, while a drug of lower potency (codeine , diazepam , ziprasidone ) evokes the same response only at higher concentrations. The potency depends on both the affinity and efficacy . Affinity is how well a drug can bind to a receptor (Fast/strong binding = higher affinity). Efficacy is the relationship between receptor occupancy and the ability to initiate a response at the molecular, cellular, tissue or system level. In other words, efficacy refers to how well an action is took after the drug is bound to a receptor. In pharmacology, a high efficacy usually means that a drug has worked since the drug caused the receptor to metabolize a certain compound extremely well
[...More...]

"Potency (pharmacology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Route Of Administration
A ROUTE OF ADMINISTRATION in pharmacology and toxicology is the path by which a drug , fluid, poison, or other substance is taken into the body. Routes of administration are generally classified by the location at which the substance is applied. Common examples include oral and intravenous administration. Routes can also be classified based on where the target of action is. Action may be topical (local), enteral (system-wide effect, but delivered through the gastrointestinal tract), or parenteral (systemic action, but delivered by routes other than the GI tract)
[...More...]

"Route Of Administration" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Active Metabolite
An ACTIVE METABOLITE is an active form of a drug after it has been processed by the body. CONTENTS * 1 Metabolites of drugs * 2 Prodrugs * 3 References * 4 Further reading METABOLITES OF DRUGSAn active metabolite results when a drug is metabolized by the body into a modified form which continues to produce effects in the body. Usually these effects are similar to those of the parent drug but weaker, although they can still be significant (see e.g. 11-hydroxy-THC
11-hydroxy-THC
, morphine-6-glucuronide ). Certain drugs such as codeine and tramadol have metabolites (morphine and O-desmethyltramadol respectively) that are stronger than the parent drug and in these cases the metabolite may be responsible for much of the therapeutic action of the parent drug. Sometimes, however, metabolites may produce toxic effects and patients must be monitored carefully to ensure they do not build up in the body
[...More...]

"Active Metabolite" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Metabolic Stability
DRUG METABOLISM is the metabolic breakdown of drugs by living organisms , usually through specialized enzymatic systems. More generally, XENOBIOTIC METABOLISM (from the Greek xenos "stranger" and biotic "related to living beings") is the set of metabolic pathways that modify the chemical structure of xenobiotics , which are compounds foreign to an organism's normal biochemistry, such any drug or poison . These pathways are a form of biotransformation present in all major groups of organisms, and are considered to be of ancient origin. These reactions often act to detoxify poisonous compounds (although in some cases the intermediates in xenobiotic metabolism can themselves cause toxic effects). The study of drug metabolism is called pharmacokinetics . The metabolism of pharmaceutical drugs is an important aspect of pharmacology and medicine . For example, the rate of metabolism determines the duration and intensity of a drug's pharmacologic action
[...More...]

"Metabolic Stability" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Oxidation
REDOX (short for REDuction–OXidation reaction) (pronunciation:/ˈrɛdɒks/ or /ˈriːdɒks/ ) is a chemical reaction in which the oxidation states of atoms are changed. Any such reaction involves both a reduction process and a complementary oxidation process, two key concepts involved with electron transfer processes. Redox
Redox
reactions include all chemical reactions in which atoms have their oxidation state changed; in general, redox reactions involve the transfer of electrons between chemical species . The chemical species from which the electron is stripped is said to have been oxidized, while the chemical species to which the electron is added is said to have been reduced
[...More...]

"Oxidation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Venezuela
Coordinates : 7°N 65°W / 7°N 65°W / 7; -65 Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela
Venezuela
* República Bolivariana de Venezuela
Venezuela
(Spanish ) Flag Coat of arms ANTHEM:
[...More...]

"Venezuela" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Indonesia
Coordinates : 5°S 120°E / 5°S 120°E / -5; 120 Republic
Republic
of Indonesia Republik Indonesia
Indonesia
(Indonesian ) Flag National emblem MOTTO:
[...More...]

"Indonesia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Side Effect
In medicine , a SIDE EFFECT is an effect, whether therapeutic or adverse, that is secondary to the one intended; although the term is predominantly employed to describe adverse effects , it can also apply to beneficial, but unintended, consequences of the use of a drug . Occasionally, drugs are prescribed or procedures performed specifically for their side effects; in that case, said side effect ceases to be a side effect, and is now an intended effect. For instance, X-rays were historically (and are currently) used as an imaging technique; the discovery of their oncolytic capability led to their employ in radiotherapy (ablation of malignant tumours )
[...More...]

"Side Effect" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gynecomastia
GYNECOMASTIA is a common disorder of the endocrine system in which there is a non-cancerous increase in the size of male breast tissue. Most adolescent boys, up to 70%, have some breast development during puberty . Newborn and adolescent males often experience temporary gynecomastia due to the influence of maternal hormones and hormonal changes during puberty, respectively. The development of gynecomastia is usually associated with benign pubertal changes; in adolescent boys, the condition is often a source of psychological distress. However, 75% of pubertal gynecomastia cases resolve within two years of onset without treatment. In rare cases, gynecomastia has been known to occur in association with certain disease states
[...More...]

"Gynecomastia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Androgen
An ANDROGEN (from Greek andros meaning male human being) is any natural or synthetic compound, usually a steroid hormone , that stimulates or controls the development and maintenance of male characteristics in vertebrates by binding to androgen receptors . This includes the activity of the primary male sex organs and development of male secondary sex characteristics . Androgens were first discovered in 1936. Androgens increase in both boys and girls during puberty. Androgens are also the original anabolic steroids and the precursor of all estrogens . The primary and most well-known androgen is testosterone . Dihydrotestosterone
Dihydrotestosterone
(DHT) and androstenedione are less known generally, but are of equal importance in male development. DHT in the embryo life causes differentiation of penis, scrotum and prostate. Later in life DHT contributes to balding, prostate growth and sebaceous gland activity
[...More...]

"Androgen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Testosterone
TESTOSTERONE is the primary male sex hormone and an anabolic steroid . In men, testosterone plays a key role in the development of male reproductive tissues such as the testis and prostate , as well as promoting secondary sexual characteristics such as increased muscle and bone mass, and the growth of body hair . In addition, testosterone is involved in health and well-being, and the prevention of osteoporosis . Insufficient levels of testosterone in men may lead to abnormalities including frailty and bone loss. Testosterone
Testosterone
is also used as a medication to treat male hypogonadism and certain types of breast cancer . Since testosterone levels gradually decrease as men age , synthetic testosterone is sometimes prescribed to older men to counteract this deficiency
[...More...]

"Testosterone" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

PubMed Identifier
PUBMED is a free search engine accessing primarily the MEDLINE database of references and abstracts on life sciences and biomedical topics. The United States National Library of Medicine (NLM) at the National Institutes of Health
National Institutes of Health
maintains the database as part of the Entrez
Entrez
system of information retrieval . From 1971 to 1997, MEDLINE online access to the MEDLARS Online computerized database primarily had been through institutional facilities, such as university libraries . PubMed, first released in January 1996, ushered in the era of private, free, home- and office-based MEDLINE searching. The PubMed
PubMed
system was offered free to the public in June 1997, when MEDLINE searches via the Web were demonstrated, in a ceremony, by Vice President Al Gore
Al Gore

[...More...]

"PubMed Identifier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
SPECIAL or SPECIALS may refer to: CONTENTS * 1 Music * 2 Film and television * 3 Other uses * 4 See also MUSIC * Special (album) , a 1992 album by Vesta Williams * "Special" (Garbage song) , 1998 * "Special" (Mew song) , 2005 * "Special" (Stephen Lynch song) , 2000 * The Specials
The Specials
, a British band * "Special", a song by Violent Femmes on The Blind Leading the Naked * "Special", a song on
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Water Retention (medicine)
The term WATER RETENTION (also known as FLUID RETENTION) or HYDROPS, HYDROPSY, edema, signifies an abnormal accumulation of clear, watery fluid in the tissues or cavities of the body. Water
Water
is found both inside and outside the body’s cells . It forms part of the blood , helping to carry the blood cells around the body and keeping oxygen and important nutrients in solution so that they can be taken up by tissues such as glands , bone and muscle . Even the organs and muscles are mostly water. The body uses a COMPLEX system of hormones and hormone-like substances called prostaglandins to keep its volume of fluid at a constant level . If one were to intake an excessive amount of fluid in one day, the amount of fluid would not be affected in the long term. This is because the kidneys quickly excrete the excess in the form of urine . Likewise, if one did not get enough to drink, the body would hold on to its fluids and urinate less than usual
[...More...]

"Water Retention (medicine)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
The INTERNATIONAL STANDARD BOOK NUMBER (ISBN) is a unique numeric commercial book identifier. An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book , a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-based and varies from country to country, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN configuration of recognition was generated in 1967 based upon the 9-digit STANDARD BOOK NUMBERING (SBN) created in 1966. The 10-digit ISBN format was developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and was published in 1970 as international standard ISO 2108 (the SBN code can be converted to a ten digit ISBN by prefixing it with a zero)
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.