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Metal Gear Solid
Metal Gear
Metal Gear
Solid[a] is an action-adventure stealth video game produced by Konami
Konami
Computer Entertainment Japan
Japan
and released for the PlayStation
PlayStation
in 1998
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Exposition (literary Technique)
Narrative exposition is the insertion of important background information within a story; for example, information about the setting, characters' backstories, prior plot events, historical context, etc.[1] In a specifically literary context, exposition appears in the form of expository writing embedded within the narrative. Exposition is one of four rhetorical modes (also known as modes of discourse), along with description, argumentation, and narration, as elucidated by Alexander Bain
Alexander Bain
and John Genung.[2] Each of the rhetorical modes is present in a variety of forms, and each has its own purpose and conventions. There are several ways to accomplish exposition. Indirect exposition/incluing[edit] Indirect exposition, sometimes called incluing, is a technique of worldbuilding in which the reader is gradually exposed to background information about the world in which a story is set
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Video Game Remake
A video game remake is a video game closely adapted from an earlier title, usually for the purpose of modernizing a game for newer hardware and contemporary audiences and is coded from scratch. Typically, a remake of such game software shares essentially the same title, fundamental gameplay concepts, and core story elements of the original game. Remakes are often made by the original developer or copyright holder, sometimes by the fan community
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Video Game Developer
A video game developer is a software developer that specializes in video game development – the process and related disciplines of creating video games.[1][2] A game developer can range from one person who undertakes all tasks[3] to a large business with employee responsibilities split between individual disciplines, such as programming, design, art, testing, etc. Most game development companies have video game publisher financial and usually marketing support.[4] Self-funded developers are known as independent or indie developers and usually make indie games.[5] A developer may specialize in a certain video game console (such as Nintendo's Nintendo
Nintendo
Switch, Microsoft's Xbox One, Sony's PlayStation 4), or may develop for a number of systems (including personal computers and mobile devices).[citation needed] Video-game developers specialize in certain types of games (such as role-playing video games or first-person shooters)
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Foxhound
A foxhound is a type of large hunting hound bred for strong hunting instincts, great energy, and, like all scent hounds, a keen sense of smell.[citation needed] In fox hunting, the foxhound's namesake, packs of foxhounds track quarry, followed—usually on horseback—by the hunters, sometimes for several miles at a stretch; moreover, foxhounds also sometimes guard sheep and houses. There are different breeds of foxhound, each often called simply Foxhound
Foxhound
in their native countries:American Foxhound English Foxhound Dumfriesshire Hound Black and Tan Virginia Foxhound Welsh HoundThe American Masters of Foxhounds Associ
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Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency
The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is an agency of the United States Department of Defense
United States Department of Defense
responsible for the development of emerging technologies for use by the military. Originally known as the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), the agency was created in February 1958 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower in response to the Soviet launching of Sputnik 1
Sputnik 1
in 1957. Since its inception, the agency's mission is ensuring that the United States avoids further technological surprise.[3] By collaborating with academic, industry, and government partners, DARPA
DARPA
formulates and executes research and development projects to expand the frontiers of technology and science, often beyond immediate U.S
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Voice Acting
Voice acting
Voice acting
is the art of performing voice-overs or providing voices to represent a character or to provide information to an audience or user. Examples include animated, off-stage, off-screen or non-visible characters in various works, including feature films, dubbed foreign language films, animated short films, television programs, commercials, radio or audio dramas, comedy, video games, puppet shows, amusement rides, audiobooks and documentaries. Voice acting
Voice acting
is also done for small handheld audio games. Performers are called voice actors or actresses, voice artists or voice talent. Their roles may also involve singing, although a second voice actor is sometimes cast as the character's singing voice
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Metacritic
Metacritic
Metacritic
is a website that aggregates reviews of media products: music albums, video games, films, TV shows, and formerly, books. For each product, the scores from each review are averaged (a weighted average).[2] Metacritic
Metacritic
was created by Jason Dietz, Marc Doyle, and Julie Doyle Roberts in 1999. The site provides an excerpt from each review and hyperlinks to its source. A color of green, yellow or red summarizes the critics' recommendations. It has been described as the video game industry's "premier" review aggregator.[3][4] Metacritic's scoring converts each review into a percentage, either mathematically from the mark given, or which the site decides subjectively from a qualitative review
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Personal Computer
A personal computer (PC) is a multi-purpose computer whose size, capabilities, and price make it feasible for individual use. PCs are intended to be operated directly by an end user, rather than by a computer expert or technician. Computer
Computer
time-sharing models that were typically used with larger, more expensive minicomputer and mainframe systems, to enable them be used by many people at the same time, are not used with PCs. Early computer owners in the 1960s, invariably institutional or corporate, had to write their own programs to do any useful work with the machines
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Sequel
A sequel is a literature, film, theatre, television, music or video game that continues the story of, or expands upon, some earlier work. In the common context of a narrative work of fiction, a sequel portrays events set in the same fictional universe as an earlier work, usually chronologically following the events of that work.[1] In many cases, the sequel continues elements of the original story, often with the same characters and settings. A sequel can lead to a series, in which key elements appear repeatedly
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Single Player Video Game
A single-player video game is a video game where input from only one player is expected throughout the course of the gaming session. A single-player game is usually a game that can only be played by one person, while "single-player mode" is usually a game mode designed to be played by a single-player, though the game also contains multi-player modes.[1] The vast majority of modern console games and arcade games are designed so that they can be played by a single-player; although many of these games have modes that allow two or more players to play (not necessarily simultaneously), very few actually require more than one player for the game to be played
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Prequel
A prequel is a literary, dramatic, or filmic work whose story precedes that of a previous work,[1][2] by focusing on events that occur before the original narrative.[3] A prequel is a work that forms part of a backstory to the preceding work. All "prequels" are, by definition, essentially sequels in that they "expand on a previous or preceding work."[4] The term is a 20th-century neologism that is a portmanteau of the prefix "pre-" (from Latin
Latin
prae, "before") and "sequel".[1][2] Like other sequels, prequels may or may not concern the same plot as the work from which they are derived. Often, they explain the background which led to the events in the original, but sometimes the connections are not as explicit
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Player Character
A player character (also known as PC and playable character) is a fictional character in a role-playing or video game whose actions are directly controlled by a player of the game rather than the rules of the game. The characters that are not controlled by a player are called non-player characters (NPCs). The actions of non-player characters are typically handled by the game itself in video games, or according to rules followed by a gamemaster refereeing tabletop role-playing games. The player character functions as a fictional, alternate body for the player controlling it.[1][2][3] Video games typically have one player character for each person playing the game. Some games offer a group of player characters for the player to choose from, allowing the player to control one of them at a time
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Protagonist
A protagonist (from Ancient Greek πρωταγωνιστής (protagonistes), meaning 'player of the first part, (chief actor)' is the main character in any story, such as a literary work or drama.[1][2] The protagonist is at the center of the story, makes the key decisions, and experiences the consequences of those decisions. The protagonist affects the main characters' circumstances as well, as they are often the primary actor propelling the story forward. If a story contains a subplot, or is a narrative made up of several stories, then the character who is interpreted as the protagonist of each subplot or individual story.[3] The word protagonist is used notably in stories and forms of literature and culture that contain stories, which would include dramas, novels, operas and films
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Field Of Vision
The visual field is the "spatial array of visual sensations available to observation in introspectionist psychological experiments".[1] The equivalent concept for optical instruments and sensors is the field of view (FOV). In optometry, ophthalmology, and neurology, a visual field test is used to determine whether the visual field is affected by diseases that cause local scotoma or a more extensive loss of vision or a reduction in sensitivity (increase in threshold).Contents1 Normal limits 2 Measuring the visual field 3 Visual field
Visual field
loss 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksNormal limits[edit]The classical image on the shape and size of the visual field by Harry Moss Traquair in his book “Clinical Perimetry” (1938; modified to show the essentials). It shows that the visual field is considerably larger on the temporal side than the often quoted 90° extent
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Set Piece (film)
In film production, a set piece is a scene or sequence of scenes whose execution requires serious logistical planning and considerable expenditure of money. The term set piece is often used more broadly to describe any important dramatic or comedic highpoint in a film or story, particularly those that provide some kind of dramatic payoff, resolution, or transition. Thus the term is often used to describe any scenes that are so essential to a film that they cannot be edited out or skipped in the shooting schedule without seriously damaging the integrity of the finished product. Often, screenplays are written around a list of such set pieces, particularly in high-budget "event movies". Set pieces are very often planned meticulously using storyboards, screentests, and rehearsals, in contrast to smaller scenes where the director and actors may be more improvisational
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