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Metal Gear Solid
METAL GEAR SOLID is an action-adventure stealth video game produced by Konami
Konami
Computer Entertainment Japan
Japan
and released for the PlayStation
PlayStation
in 1998 . The game was directed, produced, and co-written by series creator Hideo Kojima
Hideo Kojima
, and serves as a sequel to the MSX2 video games Metal Gear
Metal Gear
and Metal Gear
Metal Gear
2: Solid Snake , which Kojima also wrote and directed. Metal Gear
Metal Gear
Solid follows Solid Snake, a soldier who infiltrates a nuclear weapons facility to neutralize the terrorist threat from FOXHOUND , a renegade special forces unit. Snake must liberate two hostages, the head of DARPA
DARPA
and the president of a major arms manufacturer, confront the terrorists, and stop them from launching a nuclear strike
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Metacritic
METACRITIC is a website that aggregates reviews of media products: music albums, video games, films, TV shows, and formerly, books. For each product, the scores from each review are averaged (a weighted average ). Metacritic
Metacritic
was created by Jason Dietz, Marc Doyle, and Julie Doyle Roberts in 1999. The site provides an excerpt from each review and hyperlinks to its source. A color of Green, Yellow or Red summarizes the critics' recommendations. It has been described as the video game industry 's "premier" review aggregator. Metacritic's scoring converts each review into a percentage, either mathematically from the mark given, or which the site decides subjectively from a qualitative review. Before being averaged, the scores are weighted according to the critic's fame, stature, and volume of reviews
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Personal Computer
A PERSONAL COMPUTER (PC) is a multi-purpose computer whose size, capabilities, and price make it feasible for individual use. PCs are intended to be operated directly by an end user , rather than by a computer expert or technician. Computer
Computer
time-sharing models that were typically used with larger, more expensive minicomputer and mainframe systems, to enable them be used by many people at the same time, are not used with PCs. Early computer owners in the 1960s, invariably institutional or corporate, had to write their own programs to do any useful work with the machines. In the 2010s, personal computer users have access to a wide range of commercial software , free software ("freeware ") and free and open-source software , which are provided in ready-to-run form. Software
Software
for personal computers is typically developed and distributed independently from the hardware or OS manufacturers
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Video Game Remake
A VIDEO GAME REMAKE is a video game closely adapted from an earlier title, usually for the purpose of modernizing a game for newer hardware and contemporary audiences. Typically, a remake of such game software shares essentially the same title, fundamental gameplay concepts, and core story elements of the original game. A remake typically shares very little of the original assets and code with the original game, distinguishing it from an "enhanced port", partial remake, or remastering . Remakes are often made by the original developer or copyright holder , sometimes by the fan community . If created by the community, video game remakes are sometimes also called fan game and can be seen as part of the retrogaming phenomena
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Voice Acting
VOICE ACTING is the art of performing voice-overs or providing voices to represent a character or to provide information to an audience or user. Examples include animated , off-stage, off-screen or non-visible characters in various works, including feature films , dubbed foreign language films, animated short films , television programs , commercials , radio or audio dramas , comedy , video games , puppet shows , amusement rides , audiobooks and documentaries . Voice acting is also done for small handheld audio games . Performers are called VOICE ACTORS or ACTRESSES, VOICE ARTISTS or VOICE TALENT. Their roles may also involve singing, although a second voice actor is sometimes cast as the character's singing voice. Voice acting is recognised in Britain as a specialized dramatic profession, chiefly owing to the BBC
BBC
's long tradition of radio drama
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Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency
The DEFENSE ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS AGENCY (DARPA) is an agency of the U.S. Department of Defense responsible for the development of emerging technologies for use by the military. Originally known as the ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS AGENCY (ARPA), the agency was created in February 1958 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower in response to the Soviet launching of Sputnik 1
Sputnik 1
in 1957. Since its inception, the agency’s mission is ensuring that the United States avoids further technological surprise. By collaborating with academic, industry, and government partners, DARPA
DARPA
formulates and executes research and development projects to expand the frontiers of technology and science, often beyond immediate U.S. military requirements
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Exposition (literary Technique)
NARRATIVE EXPOSITION is the insertion of important background information within a story ; for example, information about the setting , characters' backstories , prior plot events, historical context, etc. In a specifically literary context, exposition appears in the form of expository writing embedded within the narrative. Exposition is one of four rhetorical modes (also known as modes of discourse), along with description , argumentation , and narration , as elucidated by Alexander Bain
Alexander Bain
and John Genung. Each of the rhetorical modes is present in a variety of forms, and each has its own purpose and conventions . There are several ways to accomplish exposition. INDIRECT EXPOSITION/INCLUINGINDIRECT EXPOSITION, sometimes called INCLUING, is a technique of worldbuilding in which the reader is gradually exposed to background information about the world in which a story is set
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Codename
A CODE NAME or CRYPTONYM is a word or name used, sometimes clandestinely, to refer to another name, word, project or person. Names are often used for military purposes, or in espionage . They may also be used in industrial counter-industrial espionage to protect secret projects and the like from business rivals, or to give names to projects whose marketing name has not yet been determined. Another reason for the use of names and phrases in the military is that they transmit with a lower level of cumulative errors over a walkie-talkie or radio link than actual names
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FOXHOUND
A FOXHOUND is a type of large hunting hound bred for strong hunting instincts, great energy, and, like all scent hounds , a keen sense of smell. In fox hunting , the foxhound's namesake, packs of foxhounds track quarry, followed—usually on horseback—by the hunters, sometimes for several miles at a stretch; moreover, foxhounds also sometimes guard sheep and houses. There are different breeds of foxhound, each often called simply Foxhound in their native countries: * American Foxhound * English Foxhound * Dumfriesshire Foxhound * Black and Tan Virginia Foxhound * Welsh Hound The American Masters of Foxhounds Association recognizes these breeds of foxhounds: American, Penn-Marydel, English, and Crossbred foxhounds
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Backstory
A BACKSTORY, BACKGROUND STORY, BACK-STORY, or BACKGROUND is a set of events invented for a plot , presented as preceding and leading up to that plot. It is a literary device of a narrative history all chronologically earlier than the narrative of primary interest. It is the history of characters and other elements that underlie the situation existing at the main narrative's start. Even a purely historical work selectively reveals backstory to the audience. CONTENTS * 1 Usage * 2 Recollection * 3 Shared universe * 4 See also * 5 References USAGEAs a literary device backstory is often employed to lend depth or believability to the MAIN STORY. The usefulness of having a dramatic revelation was recognized by Aristotle
Aristotle
, in Poetics . Backstories are usually revealed, partially or in full, chronologically or otherwise, as the main narrative unfolds
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Sequel
A SEQUEL is a narrative , documental , or other work of literature , film , theatre , television , music or video game that continues the story of, or expands upon, some earlier work. In the common context of a narrative work of fiction , a sequel portrays events set in the same fictional universe as an earlier work, usually chronologically following the events of that work. In many cases, the sequel continues elements of the original story, often with the same characters and settings. A sequel can lead to a series , in which key elements appear repeatedly. Although the difference between more than one sequel and a series is somewhat arbitrary, it is clear that some media franchises have enough sequels to become a series, whether originally planned as such or not
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Radar
RADAR is an object-detection system that uses radio waves to determine the range, angle, or velocity of objects. It can be used to detect aircraft , ships , spacecraft , guided missiles , motor vehicles , weather formations , and terrain . A radar system consists of a transmitter producing electromagnetic waves in the radio or microwaves domain, a transmitting antenna , a receiving antenna (often the same antenna is used for transmitting and receiving) and a receiver and processor to determine properties of the object(s). Radio waves (pulsed or continuous) from the transmitter reflect off the object and return to the receiver, giving information about the object's location and speed. Radar
Radar
was developed secretly for military use by several nations in the period before and during World War II
World War II

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Thermography
INFRARED THERMOGRAPHY (IRT), THERMAL IMAGING, and THERMAL VIDEO are examples of infrared imaging science . Thermographic cameras usually detect radiation in the long-infrared range of the electromagnetic spectrum (roughly 9,000–14,000 nanometers or 9–14 µm ) and produce images of that radiation, called THERMOGRAMS. Since infrared radiation is emitted by all objects with a temperature above absolute zero according to the black body radiation law , thermography makes it possible to see one's environment with or without visible illumination. The amount of radiation emitted by an object increases with temperature; therefore, thermography allows one to see variations in temperature. When viewed through a thermal imaging camera, warm objects stand out well against cooler backgrounds; humans and other warm-blooded animals become easily visible against the environment, day or night
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Receiver (radio)
In radio communications , a RADIO RECEIVER (RADIO) is an electronic device that receives radio waves and converts the information carried by them to a usable form. It is used with an antenna . The antenna intercepts radio waves (electromagnetic waves ) and converts them to tiny alternating currents which are applied to the receiver, and the receiver extracts the desired information. The receiver uses electronic filters to separate the desired radio frequency signal from all the other signals picked up by the antenna, an electronic amplifier to increase the power of the signal for further processing, and finally recovers the desired information through demodulation . The information produced by the receiver may be in the form of sound, images, or data
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Set Piece (film)
In film production , a SET PIECE is a scene or sequence of scenes whose execution requires serious logistical planning and considerable expenditure of money. The term SET PIECE is often used more broadly to describe any important dramatic or comedic highpoint in a film or story, particularly those that provide some kind of dramatic payoff, resolution, or transition. Thus the term is often used to describe any scenes that are so essential to a film that they cannot be edited out or skipped in the shooting schedule without seriously damaging the integrity of the finished product. Often, screenplays are written around a list of such set pieces, particularly in high-budget "event movies ". Set pieces are very often planned meticulously using storyboards , screentests, and rehearsals, in contrast to smaller scenes where the director and actors may be more improvisational
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Field Of Vision
The VISUAL FIELD is the "spatial array of visual sensations available to observation in introspectionist psychological experiments". The equivalent concept for optical instruments and sensors is the field of view (FOV). In optometry , ophthalmology , and neurology , a visual field test is used to determine whether the visual field is affected by diseases that cause local scotoma or a more extensive loss of vision or a reduction in sensitivity (increase in threshold). CONTENTS * 1 Normal limits * 2 Measuring the visual field * 3 Visual field
Visual field
loss * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 External links NORMAL LIMITS The classical image on the shape and size of the visual field by Harry Moss Traquair in his book “Clinical Perimetry” (1938; modified to show the essentials). It shows that the visual field is considerably larger on the temporal side than the often quoted 90° extent
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