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Mesne
Mesne (an Anglo-French legal form of the O. Fr. meien, mod. moyen, mean, Med. Lat. medianus, in the middle, cf. English mean), middle or intermediate, an adjective used in several legal phrases.A mesne lord is a landlord who has tenants holding under him, while himself holding of a superior lord. Similar ideas are subinfeudation and subcontract. Mesne process was such process as intervened between the beginning and end of a suit. Mesne profits are profits derived from land while in wrongful possession, and may be claimed in damages for trespass, either in a separate action or joined with an action for the recovery of the land. The plaintiff must prove that he has re-entered into possession, his title during the period for which he claims, the fact that the defendant has been in possession during that period, and the amount of the mesne profits
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Mean
In mathematics, mean has several different definitions depending on the context. In probability and statistics, population mean and expected value are used synonymously to refer to one measure of the central tendency either of a probability distribution or of the random variable characterized by that distribution.[1] In the case of a discrete probability distribution of a random variable X, the mean is equal to the sum over every possible value weighted by the probability of that value; that is, it is computed by taking the product of each possible value x of X and its probability P(x), and then adding all these products together, giving μ = ∑ x P ( x ) displaystyle mu =sum xP(x) .[2] An analogous formula applies to the case of a continuous probability distribution
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Legal
Law
Law
is a system of rules that are created and enforced through social or governmental institutions to regulate behavior.[2] Law
Law
is a system that regulates and ensures that individuals or a community adhere to the will of the state. State-enforced laws can be made by a collective legislature or by a single legislator, resulting in statutes, by the executive through decrees and regulations, or established by judges through precedent, normally in common law jurisdictions. Private individuals can create legally binding contracts, including arbitration agreements that may elect to accept alternative arbitration to the normal court process. The formation of laws themselves may be influenced by a constitution, written or tacit, and the rights encoded therein
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Puisne
Puisne (/ˈpjuːni/; from Old French
Old French
puisné, modern puîné, later born, younger (and thence, inferior) from Latin
Latin
postea, "afterwards", and natus, "born") is a legal term of art used mainly in British English[1] meaning "inferior in rank". It is pronounced like the word puny. That word, in the anglicized spelling, has become an adjective meaning weak or undersized.[2] The judges and barons of the common law courts at Westminster, other than those having a distinct title, were called puisne
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Demesne
In the feudal system, the demesne (/dɪˈmeɪn/ di-MAYN) was all the land which was retained by a lord of the manor for his own use and support, under his own management, as distinguished from land sub-enfeoffed by him to others as sub-tenants
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Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
Eleventh Edition (1910–11) is a 29-volume reference work, an edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. It was developed during the encyclopaedia's transition from a British to an American publication. Some of its articles were written by the best-known scholars of the time. This edition of the encyclopedia, containing 40,000 entries, is now in the public domain; and many of its articles have been used as a basis for articles in.[1] However, the outdated nature of some of its content makes its use as a source for modern scholarship problematic
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Public Domain
The legal term public domain refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired,[1] have been forfeited,[2] have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable.[3] For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven, and most early silent films are in the public domain either by virtue of their having been created before copyright existed, or by their copyright term having expired.[1] Some works are not covered by copyright, and are therefore in the public domain—among them the formulae of Newtonian physics, cooking recipes,[4] and all computer software created prior to 1974.[5]
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Newton-le-Willows
Newton-le-Willows
Newton-le-Willows
is a market town in the Metropolitan Borough of St Helens, Merseyside, England. Historically part of Lancashire, it is midway between Liverpool
Liverpool
and Manchester, about 15 miles (24 km) from each, 4 miles (6 km) east of St Helens, 5 miles (8 km) north of Warrington
Warrington
and 7 miles (11 km) south of Wigan
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Lancashire
Lancashire
Lancashire
(/ˈlæŋkəʃər/ LANG-kə-shər, /-ʃɪər/ -sheer or, locally, [ˈɫaŋkɪʃə(ɻ)];[2] abbreviated Lancs.) is a county in north west England. The county town is Lancaster although the administrative centre is Preston. The county has a population of 1,449,300 and an area of 1,189 square miles (3,080 km2). People from Lancashire
Lancashire
are known as Lancastrians. The history of Lancashire
Lancashire
begins with its founding in the 12th century. In the Domesday Book
Domesday Book
of 1086, some of its lands were treated as part of Yorkshire. The land that lay between the Ribble and Mersey, Inter Ripam et Mersam, was included in the returns for Cheshire
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Rental
Renting, also known as hiring or letting, is an agreement where a payment is made for the temporary use of a good, service or property owned by another. A gross lease is when the tenant pays a flat rental amount and the landlord pays for all property charges regularly incurred by the ownership.Contents1 Reasons for renting 2 Growth of rental industry2.1 Rental investment3 Rental agreements 4 Leasing 5 Rent to own 6 See also 7 ReferencesReasons for renting[edit] There are many possible reasons for renting instead of buying, for example:In many jurisdictions (including India, Spain, Australia, United Kingdom and the United States) rent used in a trade or business is tax deductible, whereas rent on a dwelling is not tax deductible in most jurisdictions. Financial inadequacy, such as renting a house when one is unable to buy it
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Defendant
A defendant is a person accused of committing a crime in criminal prosecution or a person against whom some type of civil relief is being sought in a civil case. Terminology varies from one jurisdiction to another. For example, Scots law
Scots law
does not use the term "defendant"; the terms "accused" or "panel" are used instead in criminal proceedings, and "defender" in civil proceedings.[1]Contents1 Criminal defendants 2 Civil defendants 3 England and Wales 4 See also 5 ReferencesCriminal defendants[edit] In a criminal trial, a defendant is a person accused (charged) of committing an offense (a crime; an act defined as punishable under criminal law). The other party to a criminal trial is usually a public prosecutor, but in some jurisdictions, private prosecutions are allowed. Criminal defendants are often taken into custody by police and brought before a court under an arrest warrant
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Plaintiff
A plaintiff (Π in legal shorthand) is the party who initiates a lawsuit (also known as an action) before a court. By doing so, the plaintiff seeks a legal remedy, and if successful, the court will issue judgment in favor of the plaintiff and make the appropriate court order (e.g., an order for damages). "Plaintiff" is the term used in civil cases in most English-speaking jurisdictions, the notable exception being England and Wales, where a plaintiff has, since the introduction of the Civil Procedure Rules in 1999, been known as a "claimant", but that term also has other meanings. In criminal cases, the prosecutor brings the case against the defendant, but the key complaining party is often called the "complainant". In some jurisdictions the commencement of a lawsuit is done by filing a summons, claim form or a complaint. These documents are known as pleadings, that set forth the alleged wrongs committed by the defendant or defendants with a demand for relief
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Trespass
Trespass
Trespass
is an area of criminal law or tort law broadly divided into three groups: trespass to the person, trespass to chattels and trespass to land. Trespass to the person historically involved six separate trespasses: threats, assault, battery, wounding, mayhem (or maiming), and false imprisonment.[1] Through the evolution of the common law in various jurisdictions, and
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Subcontractor
A subcontractor is an individual or in many cases a business that signs a contract to perform part or all of the obligations of another's contract. A subcontractor is a person who is hired by a general contractor (or prime contractor, or main contractor) to perform a specific task as part of the overall project and is normally paid for services provided to the project by the originating general contractor. While the most common concept of a subcontractor is in building works and civil engineering, the range of opportunities for subcontractor is much wider and it is possible that the greatest number now operate in the information technology and information sectors of business. The incentive to hire subcontractors is either to reduce costs or to mitigate project risks. In this way, the general contractor receives the same or better service than the general contractor could have provided by itself, at lower overall risk
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Worsley
Worsley
Worsley
(/ˈwɔːrzli/) is a town in the metropolitan borough of the City of Salford, in Greater Manchester, England. A profile of the electoral ward Worsley
Worsley
conducted by Salford City Council
Salford City Council
in 2014 recorded a population of 10,090.[1] It lies along the course of Worsley
Worsley
Brook, 5.75 miles (9.25 km) west of Manchester. The M60 motorway bisects the area. Historically part of Lancashire, Worsley
Worsley
has provided evidence of Roman and Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
activity, including two Roman roads. The completion in 1761 of the Bridgewater Canal
Bridgewater Canal
allowed Worsley
Worsley
to expand from a small village of cottage industries to an important town based upon cotton manufacture, iron-working, brick-making and extensive coal mining
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