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Mervyn Peake
Mervyn Laurence Peake (9 July 1911 – 17 November 1968) was an English writer, artist, poet, and illustrator. He is best known for what are usually referred to as the Gormenghast books. The three works were part of what Peake conceived as a lengthy cycle, the completion of which was prevented by his death. They are sometimes compared to the work of his older contemporary J. R. R
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Lushan District
Lianxi (simplified Chinese: 濂溪区; traditional Chinese: 濂溪區; pinyin: Liánxī Qū) is a district in Jiujiang, Jiangxi, China. It was formerly named Lushan District taking its name from Mount Lu, which was located inside its boundaries
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Life Drawing
A figure drawing is a drawing of the human form in any of its various shapes and postures using any of the drawing media. The term can also refer to the act of producing such a drawing. The degree of representation may range from highly detailed, anatomically correct renderings to loose and expressive sketches. A "life drawing" is a drawing of the human figure from observation of a live model. A figure drawing may be a composed work of art or a figure study done in preparation for a more finished work such as a painting.[1] Figure drawing is arguably the most difficult subject an artist commonly encounters, and entire courses are dedicated to the subject
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Congregational Church
Congregational churches (also Congregationalist churches; Congregationalism) are Protestant churches in the Reformed tradition practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. In the United States and the United Kingdom, many Congregational churches claim their descent from Protestant denominations formed on a theory of union published by the theologian and English separatist Robert Browne in 1582.[1] Ideas of nonconforming Protestants during the Puritan
Puritan
Reformation
Reformation
of the Church of England
Church of England
laid foundation for these churches. In England, the early Congregationalists were called Separatists or Independents to distinguish them from the similarly Calvinistic Presbyterians, whose churches embrace a polity based on the governance of elders
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Tianjin
Tianjin
Tianjin
([tʰjɛ́n.tɕín] ( listen)), formerly known in English as Tientsin, is a metropolis in northern coastal Mainland China
China
and one of the four national central cities of the country, with a total population of 15,469,500, and is also the world's 6th-most populous city proper.[3] It is governed as one of the four direct-controlled municipalities of the PRC and is thus under direct administration of the central government. Tianjin
Tianjin
borders Hebei Province and Beijing
Beijing
Municipality, bounded to the east by the Bohai Gulf portion of the Yellow Sea. Part of the Bohai Economic Rim, it is the largest coastal city in northern China. In terms of urban population, Tianjin
Tianjin
is the fourth largest in China, after Shanghai, Beijing, and Guangzhou
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Trans-Siberian Railway
The Trans-Siberian Railway
Railway
(TSR, Russian: Транссибирская магистраль, tr. Transsibirskaya Magistral, IPA: [trənsʲsʲɪˈbʲirskəjə məgʲɪˈstralʲ]) is a network of railways connecting Moscow
Moscow
with the Russian Far East.[1] With a length of 9,289 kilometres (5,772 miles), it is the longest railway line in the world. There are connecting branch lines into Mongolia, China
China
and North Korea. It has connected Moscow
Moscow
with Vladivostok
Vladivostok
since 1916, and is still being expanded. It was built between 1891 and 1916 under the supervision of Russian government ministers personally appointed by Tsar Alexander III and his son, the Tsarevich Nicholas (later Tsar Nicholas II)
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Beijing
Beijing
Beijing
(/beɪˈdʒɪŋ/;[9] Mandarin: [pèi.tɕíŋ] ( listen)), formerly romanized as Peking,[10] is the capital of the People's Republic of China, the world's second most populous city proper, and most populous capital city
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Mottingham
Mottingham
Mottingham
is a district of south east London
London
in the London
London
boroughs of Bromley, Greenwich
Greenwich
and Lewisham. It is located south of Eltham, 9 miles (14.5 km) southeast of Charing Cross.Contents1 History1.1 Toponymy 1.2 Local government 1.3 Landmarks2 Geography2.1 Mottingham
Mottingham
Estate 2.2 Coldharbour Estate3 Transport 4 Notable residents 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] Toponymy[edit] The earliest records of Mottingham
Mottingham
are from 862 AD when it was recorded as Modingahema, which means the land of Moda's people and is commonly interpreted as "the proud place"
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Royal Academy Schools
The Royal Academy of Arts
Royal Academy of Arts
(RA) is an art institution based in Burlington House
Burlington House
on Piccadilly
Piccadilly
in London
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Royal Academy
The Royal Academy of Arts
Royal Academy of Arts
(RA) is an art institution based in Burlington House
Burlington House
on Piccadilly
Piccadilly
in London
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The Sunday Times (UK)
The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
is the largest-selling British national newspaper in the "quality press" market category. It is published by Times Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News UK, which is in turn owned by News Corp. Times Newspapers also publishes The Times. The two papers were founded independently and have been under common ownership only since 1966. They were bought by News International in 1981. The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
occupies a dominant position in the quality Sunday market; its circulation of just under one million equals that of its main rivals, The Sunday Telegraph and The Observer, combined.[5] While some other national newspapers moved to a tabloid format in the early 2000s, The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
has retained the larger broadsheet format and has said that it will continue to do so
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Country Life (magazine)
A country is a region that is identified as a distinct national entity in political geography. A country may be an independent sovereign state or one that is occupied by another state, as a non-sovereign or formerly sovereign political division, or a geographic region associated with sets of previously independent or differently associated people with distinct political characteristics
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Medical Missions In China
Medical missions in China
China
by Protestant
Protestant
Christian
Christian
physicians and surgeons of the 19th and early 20th centuries laid many foundations for modern medicine in China. Western medical missionaries established the first modern clinics and hospitals, provided the first training for nurses, and opened the first medical schools in China.[1] Work was also done in opposition to the abuse of opium. Medical treatment and care came to many Chinese who were addicted, and eventually public and official opinion was influenced in favor of bringing an end to the destructive trade.[2]Contents1 Background 2 Protestant
Protestant
medical missions 3 See also 4 Footnotes 5 References 6 Further readingBackground[edit] Traditional medicine in China
China
has an ancient history
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Chatto & Windus
Chatto & Windus was an important publisher of books in London, founded in the Victorian era. Since 1987, it has been an imprint of Random House, publishers. The firm developed out of the publishing business of John Camden Hotten, founded in 1855. After his death in 1873, it was sold to Hotten's junior partner Andrew Chatto (1841–1913) who took on the minor poet W. E. Windus as partner. Chatto & Windus published Mark Twain, W. S. Gilbert, Wilkie Collins, H. G. Wells, Richard Aldington, Frederick Rolfe
Frederick Rolfe
(as Fr. Rolfe), Aldous Huxley, Samuel Beckett, the famous 'unfinished' novel Weir of Hermiston (1896) by Robert Louis Stevenson, and the first translation into English of Marcel Proust's novel À la recherche du temps perdu (Remembrance of Things Past, C. K. Scott-Moncrieff, 1922), amongst others. In 1946, the company took over the running of the Hogarth Press, founded in 1917 by Leonard and Virginia Woolf
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Ministry Of Information (United Kingdom)
The Ministry of Information (MOI), headed by the Minister of Information, was a United Kingdom government department created briefly at the end of the First World War and again during the Second World War.[1] Located in Senate House at the University of London during the 1940s, it was the central government department responsible for publicity and propaganda.Contents1 First World War1.1 Ministers of Information 1918–19192 Second World War2.1 Pre-War planning, 1935–38 2.2 The Ministry of Information and the German occupation of Czechoslovakia, 1938–39 2.3 The Phoney War, 1939–40 2.4 The Battle of Britain, 1940 2.5 Later stages of the War, 1941–45 2.6 Post War, 1945–46 2.7 Campaigns 2.8 Working practices 2.9 Ministers of Information 1939–46 2.10 Current research3 See also 4 ReferencesFirst World War[edit] In the Great War, several different agencies had been responsible for propaganda, except for a brief period when there had
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