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Mervelier
Mervelier
Mervelier
is a municipality in the district of Delémont
Delémont
in the canton of Jura in Switzerland.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Coat of arms 4 Demographics 5 Politics 6 Economy 7 Religion 8 Weather 9 Education 10 References 11 External linksHistory[edit] Mervelier
Mervelier
is first mentioned about 1184 as Morswilre. The municipality was formerly known by its German name Morschwil, however, that name is no longer used.[3] Geography[edit]Mervelier Mervelier
Mervelier
has an area of 9.74 km2 (3.76 sq mi).[1] Of this area, 4.29 km2 (1.66 sq mi) or 43.9% is used for agricultural purposes, while 5.07 km2 (1.96 sq mi) or 51.9% is forested
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Swiss Reformed Church
The Swiss Reformed
Reformed
Church (German: Evangelisch-reformierte Kirchen der Schweiz, "Evangelical Reformed
Reformed
Churches of Switzerland") refers to the Reformed
Reformed
branch of Protestantism
Protestantism
in Switzerland
Switzerland
started in Zürich
Zürich
by Huldrych Zwingli
Huldrych Zwingli
(1484–1531) and spread within a few years to Basel (Johannes Oecolampadius), Bern
Bern
( Berchtold Haller
Berchtold Haller
and Niklaus Manuel), St. Gallen
St

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Social Democratic Party Of Switzerland
The Social Democratic Party of Switzerland
Switzerland
(also rendered as Swiss Socialist Party; German: Sozialdemokratische Partei der Schweiz, SP; French: Parti socialiste suisse, PS; Italian: Partito Socialista Svizzero; Romansh: Partida Socialdemocrata de la Svizra) is a political party in Switzerland. It is represented by two Federal Councilors since 1960 and got the second-most votes in the 2015 national elections. The party was founded on 21 October 1888, and is currently the second largest of the four leading coalition political parties in Switzerland. It is the only left-wing party with representatives in the Swiss Federal Council. It is also the second largest political party in the Swiss parliament
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Christian Democratic People's Party Of Switzerland
The Christian Democratic People's Party of Switzerland
Switzerland
(German: Christlichdemokratische Volkspartei der Schweiz, CVP; French: Parti Démocrate-Chrétien, PDC; Italian: Partito Popolare Democratico, PPD; Romansh:  Partida cristiandemocratica Svizra (help·info), PCD) is a Christian democratic[2][8] political party in Switzerland. It is the fourth-largest party in the National Council, with 28 seats, and the largest in the Council of States, with 13 seats. It has one seat, that of Doris Leuthard, on the Swiss Federal Council. The party was founded as the Catholic
Catholic
Conservative Party in 1912. The party peaked in the 1950s, having three members of the Federal Council (1954–58) before agreeing to the Magic formula. It adopted its current name in 1970
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Christian Social Party (Switzerland)
A Christian
Christian
(/ˈkrɪstʃən, -tiən/ ( listen)) is a person who follows or adheres to Christianity, an Abrahamic, monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus
Jesus
Christ
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Voter Turnout
Voter turnout
Voter turnout
is the percentage of eligible voters who cast a ballot in an election. Eligibility varies by country, and the voting-eligible population should not be confused with the total adult population. Age and citizenship status are often among the criteria used to determine eligibility, but some countries further restrict eligibility based on sex, race, and/or religion. After increasing for many decades, there has been a trend of decreasing voter turnout in most established democracies since the 1980s.[1] In general, low turnout is attributed to disillusionment, indifference, or a sense of futility (the perception that one's vote won't make any difference). Low turnout is usually considered to be undesirable. As a result, there have been many efforts to increase voter turnout and encourage participation in the political process
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Primary Sector Of The Economy
An industry involved in the extraction and collection of natural resources, such as copper and timber, as well as by activities such as farming and fishing. A company in a primary industry can also be involved in turning natural resources into products. Primary industry tends to make up a larger portion of the economy of developing countries than they do for developed countries. See also service industry, secondary industry. The primary sector is concerned with the extraction of raw materials
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Secondary Sector Of The Economy
The secondary sector include industries that produce a finished, usable product or are involved in construction. This sector generally takes the output of the primary sector and manufactures finished goods or where they are suitable for used by other businesses, for export, or sale to domestic consumers. This sector is often divided into light industry and heavy industry. Many of these industries consume large quantities of energy and require factories and machinery to convert the raw materials into goods and products. They also produce waste materials and waste heat that may cause environmental problems or cause pollution. The secondary sector supports both the primary and tertiary sector. Some economists contrast wealth-producing sectors in an economy such as manufacturing with the service sector which tends to be wealth-consuming.[1] Examples of service may include retail, insurance, and government
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Tertiary Sector Of The Economy
The tertiary sector or service sector is the third of the three economic sectors of the three-sector theory. The others are the secondary sector (approximately the same as manufacturing), and the primary sector (raw materials). The service sector consists of the production of services instead of end products. Services (also known as "intangible goods") include attention, advice, access, experience, discussion, and affective labor. The production of information has long been regarded as a service, but some economists now attribute it to a fourth sector, the quaternary sector. The tertiary sector of industry involves the provision of services to other businesses as well as final consumers. Services may involve the transport, distribution and sale of goods from producer to a consumer, as may happen in wholesaling and retailing, pest control or entertainment. The goods may be transformed in the process of providing the service, as happens in the restaurant industry
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Full-time Equivalent
Full-time equivalent (FTE) or whole time equivalent (WTE) is a unit that indicates the workload of an employed person (or student) in a way that makes workloads or class loads comparable[1] across various contexts. FTE is often used to measure a worker's or student's involvement in a project, or to track cost reductions in an organization. An FTE of 1.0 is equivalent to a full-time worker or student, while an FTE of 0.5 signals half of a full work or school load.[2]Contents1 U.S. Federal Government 2 In education2.1 Example3 Notes 4 ReferencesU.S. Federal Government[edit] In the U.S
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Roman Catholic
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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Orthodox Christianity
Orthodoxy
Orthodoxy
(from Greek ορθοδοξία, orthodoxía – "right opinion")[1] is adherence to correct or accepted creeds, especially in religion.[2] In the Christian sense the term means "conforming to the Christian faith as represented in the creeds of the early Church."[3] The first seven Ecumenical Councils were held between the years of 325 and 787 with the aim of formalizing accepted doctrines. In some English speaking countries, Jews who adhere to all the traditions and commandments as legislated in the
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List Of Sovereign States
This list of sovereign states provides an overview of sovereign states around the world, with information on their status and recognition of their sovereignty. Membership within the United Nations
United Nations
system divides the 206 listed states into three categories: 193 member states,[1] 2 observer states, and 11 other states. The sovereignty dispute column indicates states whose sovereignty is undisputed (191 states) and states whose sovereignty is disputed (15 states, out of which there are 5 member states, 1 observer state and 9 other states). Compiling a list such as this can be a difficult and controversial process, as there is no definition that is binding on all the members of the community of nations concerning the criteria for statehood. For more information on the criteria used to determine the contents of this list, please see the criteria for inclusion section below
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Agnosticism
Related concepts and fundamentals:Agnosticism Epistemology Presupposition Probabilityv t e Agnosticism
Agnosticism
is the view that the existence of God, of the divine or the supernatural is unknown or unknowable.[1][2][3] According to the philosopher William L. Rowe, "agnosticism is the view that human reason is incapable of providing sufficient rational grounds to justify either the belief that God
God
exists or the belief that God
God
does not exist".[2] Agnosticism
Agnosticism
is the doctrine or tenet of agnostics with regard to the existence of anything beyond and behind material phenomena or to knowledge of a First Cause or God,[4] and is not a religion. English biologist Thomas Henry Huxley
Thomas Henry Huxley
coined the word "agnostic" in 1869
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Atheism
Atheism
Atheism
is, in the broadest sense, the absence of belief in the existence of deities.[1][2][3][4] Less broadly, atheism is the rejection of belief that any deities exist.[5][6] In an even narrower sense, atheism is specifically the position that there are no deities.[1][2][7][8] Atheism
Atheism
is contrasted with theism,[9][10] which, in its most general form, is the belief that at least one deity exists.[10][11][12] The etymological root for the word atheism originated before the 5th century BCE from the ancient Greek ἄθεος (atheos), meaning "without god(s)"
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