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Meridian Hill Park
Meridian Hill Park
Meridian Hill Park
is a structured urban park located in the Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
neighborhood of Columbia Heights; it also abuts the nearby neighborhood of Adams Morgan. The park was designed and built between 1912 and 1940. This 12 acre (49,000 m²) formally landscaped site is maintained by the National Park Service
National Park Service
as a part of Rock Creek Park, but is not contiguous with that much larger nearby park. Meridian Hill Park
Meridian Hill Park
is bordered by 15th, 16th, W, and Euclid Streets NW, and sits on a prominent hill 1.5 miles (2.42 km) directly north of the White House
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National Register Of Historic Places
The National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
(NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property. The passage of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) in 1966 established the National Register and the process for adding properties to it. Of the more than one million properties on the National Register, 80,000 are listed individually
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Joan Of Arc
Hundred Years War Loire
Loire
Campaign:Siege of Orléans Battle
Battle
of Jargeau Battle
Battle
of Meung-sur-Loire Battle
Battle
of Beaugency Battle
Battle
of PatayMarch to Reims Siege of Paris Siege of La Charité Siege of CompiègneSignature Joan of Arc
Joan of Arc
(French: Jeanne d'Arc,[5] IPA: [ʒan daʁk]; 6 January c. 1412[6] – 30 May 1431), nicknamed "The Maid of Orléans" (French: La Pucelle d'Orléans), is considered a heroine of France for her role during the Lancastrian phase of the Hundred Years' War and was canonized as a Roman Catholic saint. Joan of Arc
Joan of Arc
was born to Jacques d'Arc
Jacques d'Arc
and Isabelle Romée, a peasant family, at Domrémy in north-east France
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Landscape Architecture
Landscape architecture
Landscape architecture
is the design of outdoor areas, landmarks, and structures to achieve environmental, social-behavioural, or aesthetic outcomes.[2] It involves the systematic investigation of existing social, ecological, and soil conditions and processes in the landscape, and the design of interventions that will produce the desired outcome. The scope of the profession includes landscape design; site planning; stormwater management; environmental restoration; parks and recreation planning; visual resource management; green infrastructure planning and provision; and private estate and residence landscape master planning and design; all at varying scales of design, planning and management
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National Historic Landmark
A National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
(NHL) is a building, district, object, site, or structure that is officially recognized by the United States government for its outstanding historical significance. Of over 90,000 places listed on the country's National Register of Historic Places, only some 2,500 are recognized as National Historic Landmarks. A National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
District may include contributing properties that are buildings, structures, sites or objects, and it may include non-contributing properties
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Capital (political)
A capital city (or simply capital) is the municipality exercising primary status in a country, state, province, or other administrative region, usually as its seat of government. A capital is typically a city that physically encompasses the government's offices and meeting places; the status as capital is often designated by its law or constitution. In some jurisdictions, including several countries, the different branches of government are located in different settlements. In some cases, a distinction is made between the official (constitutional) capital and the seat of government, which is in another place. Capital cities that are also the prime economic, cultural, or intellectual centres of a nation or an empire are sometimes referred to as primate cities
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Italian Renaissance
Transition from the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
to the Modern era Renaissance
Renaissance
spreads to the rest of Europe Development of capitalism, banking, merchantilism and accounting: beginning of the European Great Divergence Explorers from the Italian maritime r
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French Baroque
17th-century French art
French art
is generally referred to as Baroque, but from the mid to late 17th century, the style of French art
French art
shows a classical adherence to certain rules of proportion and sobriety uncharacteristic of the Baroque
Baroque
as it was practiced in Southern and Eastern Europe during the same period.Contents1 Louis XIII style 2 Residential architecture 3 The court of Louis XIV 4 See also 5 References and further readingLouis XIII style[edit] Main article: Louis XIII style In the early part of the 17th century, late mannerist and early Baroque
Baroque
tendencies continued to flourish in the court of Marie de' Medici and Louis XIII. Art from this period shows influences from both the north of Europe (Dutch and Flemish schools) and from Roman painters of the Counter-Reformation
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Angela Davis
Angela Yvonne Davis (born January 26, 1944) is an American political activist, academic, and author. She emerged as a prominent counterculture activist and radical in the 1960s as a leader of the Communist Party
Communist Party
USA, and had close relations with the Black Panther Party through her involvement in the Civil Rights Movement.[4] As a result of purchasing firearms used in the 1970 armed take-over of a Marin County, California
Marin County, California
courtroom, in which four persons were killed, she was prosecuted for conspiracy. She was later acquitted of this charge.[5] She is a professor emerita at the University of California, Santa Cruz, in its History of Consciousness Department
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Paul Dubois (sculptor)
Paul Dubois (18 July 1829 – 23 May 1905) was a French sculptor and painter from Nogent-sur-Seine, France. His works were mainly sculptures and statues, and he was also a portrait painter.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Main works 4 Le musée Dubois-Boucher 5 Gallery of images 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Paul Dubois was born on the 18 July 1829 in Nogent-sur-Seine, France. He began studying law to please his father who practiced as a notary, but gave this up in order to train as a sculptor; his enthusiasm for this possibly fanned by the admiration he had for the work of his great-uncle Jean-Baptiste Pigalle.[1] When making his debut at the Paris Salon in 1857 he did so under the name Dubois-Pigalle.[2] Career[edit] In 1858 he entered the atelier of Armand Toussaint at the École Nationale des Beaux-Arts
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Dante
Dante Alighieri
Dante Alighieri
(Italian: [duˈrante deʎʎ aliˈɡjɛːri]), simply called Dante (Italian: [ˈdante], UK: /ˈdænti/, US: /ˈdɑːnteɪ/; c. 1265 – 1321), was a major Italian poet of the Late Middle Ages/Early Renaissance. His Divine Comedy, originally called Comedìa (modern Italian: Commedia) and later christened Divina by Boccaccio, is widely considered the most important poem of the Middle Ages and the greatest literary work in the Italian language.[1][2] In the late Middle Ages, most poetry was written in Latin, accessible only to the most educated readers. In De vulgari eloquentia
De vulgari eloquentia
(On Eloquence in the Vernacular), however, Dante defended use of the vernacular in literature
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Notre-Dame De Reims
Reims
Reims
Cathedral
Cathedral
(Our Lady of Reims, French: Notre-Dame de Reims) is a Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
church in Reims, France, built in the High Gothic style. The cathedral replaced an older church, destroyed by fire in 1211, that was built on the site of the basilica where Clovis I
Clovis I
was baptized by Saint Remi, bishop of Reims
Reims
in 496
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France
France
France
(French: [fʁɑ̃s]), officially the French Republic (French: République française [ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.[XIII] The metropolitan area of France
France
extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean. The overseas territories include French Guiana
French Guiana
in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
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Equestrian Statue
An equestrian statue is a statue of a rider mounted on a horse, from the Latin
Latin
"eques", meaning "knight", deriving from "equus", meaning "horse".[1] A statue of a riderless horse is strictly an "equine statue". A full-sized equestrian statue is a difficult and expensive object for any culture to produce, and figures have typically been portraits of rulers or, more recently, military commanders.Contents1 History1.1 Ancient Greece 1.2 Ancient Middle and Far East 1.3 Ancient Rome 1.4 Medieval Europe 1.5 Renaissance 1.6 Absolutism 1.7 United States 1.8 20th century2 Tallest and largest equestrian statue 3 Hoof-position symbolism 4 Song 5 Bibliography 6 See also 7 Gallery7.1 Asia 7.2 Australia 7.3 Europe 7.4 North America 7.5 South America8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]Khosrow Parviz is standing here
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Dante Alighieri
Dante Alighieri
Dante Alighieri
(Italian: [duˈrante deʎʎ aliˈɡjɛːri]), simply called Dante (Italian: [ˈdante], UK: /ˈdænti/, US: /ˈdɑːnteɪ/; c. 1265 – 1321), was a major Italian poet of the Late Middle Ages/Early Renaissance. His Divine Comedy, originally called Comedìa (modern Italian: Commedia) and later christened Divina by Boccaccio, is widely considered the most important poem of the Middle Ages and the greatest literary work in the Italian language.[1][2] In the late Middle Ages, most poetry was written in Latin, accessible only to the most educated readers. In De vulgari eloquentia
De vulgari eloquentia
(On Eloquence in the Vernacular), however, Dante defended use of the vernacular in literature
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