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Mercer Ellington
Mercer Kennedy Ellington[2] (March 11, 1919 – February 8, 1996) was an American musician, composer, and arranger.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life and education 1.2 Career 1.3 Death and legacy2 Personal life 3 Discography3.1 As leader 3.2 As arranger4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Early life and education[edit] Ellington was born in Washington, DC. He was the only child of the composer, pianist, and bandleader Duke Ellington
Duke Ellington
and his high school sweetheart Edna Thompson (d. 1967). By the age of eighteen, Ellington had written his first piece to be recorded by his father ("Pigeons and Peppers")
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University Of Rochester
The University
University
of Rochester (U of R or UR) frequently referred to as Rochester, is a private, nonsectarian, research university in Rochester, New York.[5] The university grants undergraduate and graduate degrees, including doctoral and professional degrees. In its history, 6 university alumni, 2 faculty, and 1 senior research associate at Strong Memorial Hospital have been awarded a Nobel Prize; 32 faculty serve in the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; 12 alumni and faculty members have won a Pulitzer Prize, and 20 faculty members have been awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship.[6] The University
University
of Rochester, across all of its schools and campuses, enrolls approximately 5,600 undergraduates and 4,600 graduate students
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Jazz Standard
Jazz
Jazz
standards are musical compositions that are an important part of the musical repertoire of jazz musicians, in that they are widely known, performed, and recorded by jazz musicians, and widely known by listeners. There is no definitive list of jazz standards, and the list of songs deemed to be standards changes over time. Songs included in major fake book publications (sheet music collections of popular tunes) and jazz reference works offer a rough guide to which songs are considered standards. Not all jazz standards were written by jazz composers
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Dizzy Gillespie
John Birks "Dizzy" Gillespie (/ɡɪˈlɛspi/; October 21, 1917 – January 6, 1993) was an American jazz trumpeter, bandleader, composer, and singer.[1] Gillespie was a trumpet virtuoso and improviser, building on the virtuoso style of Roy Eldridge[2] but adding layers of harmonic complexity previously unheard in jazz. His beret and horn-rimmed spectacles, his scat singing, his bent horn, pouched cheeks and his light-hearted personality were essential in popularizing bebop.[citation needed] In the 1940s Gillespie, with Charlie Parker, became a major figure in the development of bebop and modern jazz.[3] He taught and influenced many other musicians, including trumpeters Miles Davis, Jon Faddis, Fats Navarro, Clifford Brown, Arturo Sandoval, Lee Morgan,[4] Chuck Mangione,[5] and balladeer Johnny Hartman.[6] AllMusic's Scott Yanow wrote: "Dizzy Gillespie's contributions to jazz were huge
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Gregory Charles Royal
Gregory Charles Royal, also known as Chuck Royal (born October 10, 1961, in Greensboro, North Carolina), is an American musician, trombonist, composer, writer, founder of the New York Jazz Film Festival, a judge on America's Hot Musician.[1][2] and the artistic director of the American Youth Symphony (AYS) in Washington, D.C.[3]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career 3 References 4 BibliographyEarly life and education[edit] Royal is the son of biochemist and microbiologist husband and wife team Gladys W. Royal
Gladys W. Royal
and George C. Royal, and grew up in Washington, DC
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Idrees Sulieman
Idrees Sulieman
Idrees Sulieman
(August 7, 1923 – July 23, 2002, both in St. Petersburg, Florida) was a bop and hard bop trumpeter.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Death 3 Discography3.1 As leader 3.2 As sideman4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] He was born Leonard Graham on 7 August 1923, later changing his name to Idrees Sulieman
Idrees Sulieman
after converting to Islam.[2] He studied at the Boston Conservatory, and gained early experience playing with the Carolina Cotton Pickers and the wartime Earl Hines
Earl Hines
Orchestra (1943–1944). On October 15, 1947, on what was Suliman’s second recording date (source: liner notes by Michael Cuscuna to The Complete Blue Note Recordings of Thelonious Monk) he played on Thelonious Monk’s first recording for Blue Note Records
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Chico Hamilton
Foreststorn "Chico" Hamilton, (September 20, 1921 – November 25, 2013) was an American jazz drummer and bandleader. He came to prominence as sideman with the likes of Lester Young, Gerry Mulligan, Count Basie
Count Basie
and Lena Horne. Hamilton then struck out as a bandleader, first with a quintet featuring the cello as a lead instrument, an unusual choice for a jazz band in the 1950s, and subsequently leading a number of groups over the years that performed cool jazz, post bop and jazz fusion.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life and career 1.2 Bandleader 1.3 Later career2 Death 3 Discography3.1 As leader 3.2 As sideman4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Early life and career[edit] Foreststorn Hamilton was born in Los Angeles, California, one of three brothers
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Charles Mingus
Charles Mingus
Mingus
Jr. (April 22, 1922 – January 5, 1979) was an American jazz double bassist, pianist, composer and bandleader. His compositions retained the hot and soulful feel of hard bop, drawing heavily from black gospel music and blues, while sometimes containing elements of Third Stream, free jazz, and classical music. He once cited Duke Ellington
Duke Ellington
and church as his main influences. Mingus
Mingus
espoused collective improvisation, similar to the old New Orleans jazz parades, paying particular attention to how each band member interacted with the group as a whole. In creating his bands, he looked not only at the skills of the available musicians, but also their personalities. Many musicians passed through his bands and later went on to impressive careers. He recruited talented and sometimes little-known artists, whom he utilized to assemble unconventional instrumental configurations
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Tom Marcello
Tom Marcello has been a jazz photojournalist since the 1970s. His photos have appeared as album covers, in liner notes, in press kits and in newspapers. Among his subjects are Woody Shaw, Zoot Sims, Dexter Gordon, Sonny Stitt, Marvin Peterson, Charles Mingus, The Heath Brothers, and Kenny Washington.[1] References[edit]Wikimedia Commons has media related to Tom Marcello.^ Allaboutjazz.comThis article about an American photographer is a stub
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Lena Horne
Lena Mary Calhoun Horne (June 30, 1917 – May 9, 2010) was an African American jazz and pop music singer, dancer, actress, and civil rights activist. Horne's career spanned over 70 years appearing in film, television, and theater. Horne joined the chorus of the Cotton Club
Cotton Club
at the age of 16 and became a nightclub performer before moving to Hollywood, where she had small parts in numerous movies, and more substantial parts in the 1943 films Cabin in the Sky and Stormy Weather. Because of the Red Scare and her political activism, Horne found herself blacklisted and unable to get work in Hollywood.[2] Returning to her roots as a nightclub performer, Horne took part in the March on Washington
March on Washington
in August 1963 and continued to work as a performer, both in nightclubs and on television while releasing well-received record albums
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Broadway Theatre
Broadway theatre,[nb 1] commonly known as Broadway, refers to the theatrical performances presented in the 41 professional theatres with 500 or more seats located in the Theater District and Lincoln Center along Broadway, in Midtown Manhattan, New York City.[1] Along with London's West End theatre, Broadway theatre
Broadway theatre
is widely considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre in the English-speaking world. The Theater District is a popular tourist attraction in New York City. According to The Broadway League, for the 2016–2017 season (which ended May 21, 2017), total attendance was 13,270,343 and Broadway shows had US$1,449,399,149 in grosses, with attendance down 0.4%, grosses up 5.5%, and playing weeks down 4.1%.[2] The great majority of Broadway shows are musicals
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Peggy Lee
Norma Deloris Egstrom (May 26, 1920 – January 21, 2002) known professionally as Peggy Lee, was an American jazz and popular music singer, songwriter, composer, and actress, in a career spanning six decades. From her beginning as a vocalist on local radio to singing with Benny Goodman's big band, she forged a sophisticated persona, evolving into a multi-faceted artist and performer
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Alto Horn
The tenor horn (British English; alto horn in American English, Althorn in Germany; occasionally referred to as E♭ horn) is a brass instrument in the saxhorn family, and is usually pitched in E♭. It has a bore that is mostly conical, like the flugelhorn and baritone horn, and normally uses a deep, cornet-like mouthpiece. It is most commonly used in British brass bands, whereas the French horn tends to take the corresponding parts in concert bands and orchestras. However, the tenor horn has occasionally been used as an alternative to the French horn
French horn
in concert bands.Contents1 Description 2 Range2.1 Notation3 History 4 Repertoire 5 Notes 6 External linksDescription[edit] The tenor horn is a valved brass instrument (in E♭) which has a predominantly conical bore like the baritone horn and flugelhorn. It uses a deep funnel- or cup-shaped mouthpiece
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Copyist
A copyist is a person who makes copies. The term is sometimes used for artists who make copies of other artists' paintings. However, the modern use of the term is almost entirely confined to music copyists, who are employed by the music industry to produce neat copies from a composer or arranger's manuscript. Music copyists[edit] Until the 1990s, most copyists worked by hand to write out scores and individual instrumental parts neatly, using a calligraphy pen, manuscript paper, and often a ruler. Producing parts for an entire orchestra from a full score was a huge task. In the 1990s, copyists began using scorewriters - computer programs which are the music notation equivalent of a word processor. (Such programs include Sibelius, Finale, MuseScore
MuseScore
or GNU LilyPond)
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Musical Theatre
Musical theatre
Musical theatre
is a form of theatrical performance that combines songs, spoken dialogue, acting and dance. The story and emotional content of a musical – humor, pathos, love, anger – are communicated through the words, music, movement and technical aspects of the entertainment as an integrated whole. Although musical theatre overlaps with other theatrical forms like opera and dance, it may be distinguished by the equal importance given to the music as compared with the dialogue, movement and other elements. Since the early 20th century, musical theatre stage works have generally been called, simply, musicals. Although music has been a part of dramatic presentations since ancient times, modern Western musical theatre emerged during the 19th century, with many structural elements established by the works of Gilbert and Sullivan in Britain and those of Harrigan and Hart in America
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Disc Jockey
A disc jockey, often abbreviated as DJ, is a person who plays existing recorded music for a live audience. Most common types of DJs include radio DJ, club DJ who performs at a nightclub or music festival, and turntablist who uses record players, usually turntables, to manipulate sounds on phonograph records. Originally, the "disc" in "disc jockey" referred to gramophone records, but now "DJ" is used as an all-encompassing term to describe someone who mixes recorded music from any source, including cassettes, CDs, or digital audio files on a CDJ
CDJ
or laptop. The title "DJ" is commonly used by DJs in front of their real names or adopted pseudonyms or stage names. DJs use equipment that can play at least two sources of recorded music simultaneously and mix them together to create seamless transitions between recordings and develop unique mixes of songs
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