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Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG
The Mercedes-Benz
Mercedes-Benz
SLS AMG (C197 / R197) is a front mid-engine, 2-seater, limited production sports car developed by the Mercedes-AMG division of German automotive manufacturer Mercedes-Benz
Mercedes-Benz
and was the first Mercedes-Benz
Mercedes-Benz
automobile designed in-house by AMG.[4] The car, which has gull-wing doors, was the successor to the Mercedes-Benz
Mercedes-Benz
SLR McLaren and was described by Mercedes-Benz
Mercedes-Benz
as a spiritual successor to the Mercedes-Benz 300SL
Mercedes-Benz 300SL
Gullwing.[5] SLS stands for "Super Leicht Sport" (Super Light Sport)
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Daimler AG
Daimler AG
Daimler AG
(German pronunciation: [ˈdaɪmlɐ aːˈɡeː] ( listen)) is a German multinational automotive corporation. Daimler AG
Daimler AG
is headquartered in Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg, Germany. As of 2014, Daimler owned or had shares in a number of car, bus, truck and motorcycle brands including Mercedes-Benz, Mercedes-AMG, Smart Automobile, Detroit
Detroit
Diesel, Freightliner, Western Star, Thomas Built Buses, Setra, BharatBenz, Mitsubishi Fuso, MV Agusta
MV Agusta
as well as shares in Denza, KAMAZ
KAMAZ
and Beijing
Beijing
Automotive Group. The luxury Maybach
Maybach
brand was terminated at the end of 2012, but revived in April 2015 as "Mercedes-Maybach" versions of the Mercedes-Benz
Mercedes-Benz
S-Class and G-Class
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Explosive Bolt
A pyrotechnic fastener (also called an explosive bolt, or pyro, within context) is a fastener, usually a nut or bolt, that incorporates a pyrotechnic charge that can be initiated remotely. One or more explosive charges embedded within the bolt are typically activated by an electric current, and the charge breaks the bolt into two or more pieces. The bolt is typically scored around its circumference at the point(s) where the severance should occur.[1] Such bolts are often used in space applications to ensure separation between rocket stages, because they are lighter and much more reliable than mechanical latches. For safety and reliability, exploding bridgewire detonators and slapper detonators are often used in aerospace technology instead of classical blasting caps. More recent developments have used pulsed laser diodes to detonate initiators through fiber-optic cables, which subsequently fire the main charge. Gas generators are close cousins of pyrotechnic fasteners
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Germany
Coordinates: 51°N 9°E / 51°N 9°E / 51; 9Federal Republic
Republic
of Germany Bundesrepublik Deutschland (German)[a]FlagCoat of armsMotto:  "Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit" (de facto) "Unity and Justice and Freedom"Anthem: "Deutschlandlied" (third verse only)[b] "Song of Germany"Location of  Germany  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Location of
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Naturally Aspirated Engine
A naturally aspirated engine is an internal combustion engine in which oxygen intake depends solely on atmospheric pressure and does not rely on forced induction through a turbocharger or a supercharger.[1] Many sports cars specifically use naturally aspirated engines to avoid turbo lag.Contents1 Description 2 Applications 3 Advantages and disadvantages3.1 Advantages 3.2 Disadvantages4 See also 5 ReferencesDescription[edit] In a naturally aspirated engine, air for combustion (diesel cycle in a diesel engine or specific types of Otto cycle
Otto cycle
in petrol engines—namely petrol direct injection), or an air/fuel mixture (traditional Otto cycle
Otto cycle
petrol engines)—is drawn into the engine’s cylinders by atmospheric pressure acting against a partial vacuum that occurs as the piston travels downwards toward bottom dead centre during the intake stroke
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Dry-sump
A dry-sump system is a method to manage the lubricating motor oil in four-stroke and large two-stroke piston driven internal combustion engines. The dry-sump system uses two or more oil pumps and a separate oil reservoir, as opposed to a conventional wet-sump system, which uses only the main sump (U.S.: oil pan) below the engine and a single pump. A dry-sump engine requires a pressure relief valve to regulate negative pressure inside the engine, so internal seals are not inverted. Engines are both lubricated and cooled by oil that circulates throughout the engine, feeding various bearings and other moving parts and then draining, via gravity, into the sump at the base of the engine. In the wet-sump system of most production automobile engines, a pump collects this oil from the sump and directly circulates it back through the engine
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Paris Motor Show
The Paris
Paris
Motor Show (French: Mondial de l'Automobile) is a biennial auto show in Paris. Held during October, it is one of the most important auto shows,[1] often with many new production automobile and concept car debuts. The show presently takes place in Paris
Paris
expo Porte de Versailles. The Mondial is scheduled by the Organisation Internationale des Constructeurs d'Automobiles, which considers it a major international auto show. In 2014, the Paris
Paris
Motor Show welcomed 1,253,513 visitors, making it the most visited auto show in the world, ahead of Tokyo and Frankfurt. Until 1986, it was called the Salon de l'Automobile; it took the name Mondial de l'Automobile in 1988
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Gas Strut
A gas spring is a type of spring that, unlike a typical mechanical spring that relies on elastic deformation, uses compressed gas contained within an enclosed cylinder sealed by a sliding piston to pneumatically store potential energy and withstand external force applied parallel to the direction of the piston shaft. Common applications include automobiles (where they are incorporated into the design of struts that support the weight of the hatchback tailgate while they are open) and office chairs. They are also used in furniture, medical and aerospace applications
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Semi-automatic Transmission
A semi-automatic transmission (also known as a clutch-less manual transmission, automated manual transmission, trigger shift, flappy-paddle gear shift, Manumatic, Tiptronic, Touchshift, Geartronic, Sportronic or paddle-shift gearbox) is an automobile transmission that combines manual transmission and automatic transmission. It allows convenient driver control of gear selection. For most of automotive history, automatic transmissions already allowed some control of gear selection using the console or shifter, usually to limit the transmission shifting beyond a certain gear (allowing engine braking on downhills) and/or locking out the use of overdrive gears when towing
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New European Driving Cycle
The New European Driving Cycle
New European Driving Cycle
(NEDC) is a driving cycle, last updated in 1997, designed to assess the emission levels of car engines and fuel economy in passenger cars (which excludes light trucks and commercial vehicles). It is also referred to as MVEG cycle (Motor Vehicle Emissions Group). The NEDC, which is supposed to represent the typical usage of a car in Europe, is repeatedly criticised for delivering economy-figures which are unachievable in reality. It consists of four repeated ECE-15 urban driving cycles (UDC) and one Extra-Urban driving cycle (EUDC). The test procedure is defined in UNECE
UNECE
R101[1] for the measurement of CO2 and fuel consumption and/or the measurement of electric energy consumption and electric range in hybrid and fully electric M1 and N1 vehicles, and UNECE
UNECE
R83[2] for the measurement of emission of pollutants of M, N1 and M2 vehicles
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Car And Driver
Car and Driver
Car and Driver
(CD or C/D) is an American automotive enthusiast magazine. Its total circulation is 1.23 million.[2] It is owned by Hearst Magazines, who purchased prior owner Hachette Filipacchi Media U.S. in 2011
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Bell Crank
A bellcrank is a type of crank that changes motion through an angle. The angle can be any angle from 0 to 360 degrees, but 90 degrees and 180 degrees are most common. The name comes from its first use, changing the vertical pull on a rope to a horizontal pull on the striker of a bell, used for calling staff in large houses or commercial establishments.Contents1 Angles 2 Mechanical advantage 3 Applications3.1 Aircraft 3.2 Automotive4 References 5 External linksAngles[edit] A typical 90 degree bellcrank consists of an "L" shaped crank pivoted where the two arms of the L meet. Moving rods (or cables or ropes) are attached to the ends of the L arms. When one is pulled, the L rotates around the pivot point, pulling on the other arm. A typical 180 degree bellcrank consists of a straight bar pivoted in the center
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Model Year
The model year (MY) of a product is a number used worldwide, but with a high level of prominence in North America, to describe approximately when a product was produced, and it usually indicates the coinciding base specification (design revision number) of that product. The model year and the actual calendar year of production rarely coincide. For example, a 2015 model year automobile is available during most of the 2015 calendar year, but is usually also available from the third quarter of 2014 because production of the 2015 model began in July or August 2014. When a new model is introduced there may be an additional delay to retool and retrain for production of the new model.[citation needed] The variables of build date and design revision number are semi-independent
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Anti-lock Braking System
An anti-lock braking system or anti-skid braking system[1] (ABS) is an automobile safety system that allows the wheels on a motor vehicle to maintain tractive contact with the road surface according to driver inputs while braking, preventing the wheels from locking up (ceasing rotation) and avoiding uncontrolled skidding. It is an automated system that uses the principles of threshold braking and cadence braking which were practiced by skillful drivers with previous generation braking systems. It does this at a much faster rate and with better control than many drivers could manage. ABS generally offers improved vehicle control and decreases stopping distances on dry and slippery surfaces; however, on loose gravel or snow-covered surfaces, ABS can significantly increase braking distance, although still improving vehicle steering control.[2][3][4] Since initial widespread use in production cars, anti-lock braking systems have been improved considerably
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Electronic Stability Program
Electronic stability control
Electronic stability control
(ESC), also referred to as electronic stability program (ESP) or dynamic stability control (DSC), is a computerized technology[1][2] that improves a vehicle's stability by detecting and reducing loss of traction (skidding).[3] When ESC detects loss of steering control, it automatically applies the brakes to help "steer" the vehicle where the driver intends to go. Braking is automatically applied to wheels individually, such as the outer front wheel to counter oversteer or the inner rear wheel to counter understeer. Some ESC systems also reduce engine power until control is regained. ESC does not improve a vehicle's cornering performance; instead, it helps to minimize the loss of control. According to the U.S
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Fédération Internationale De L'Automobile
The Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile
Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile
(FIA, English: International Automobile Federation) is an association established as the Association Internationale des Automobile Clubs Reconnus (AIACR, English: 'International Association of Recognized Automobile Clubs') on 20 June 1904 to represent the interests of motoring organisations and motor car users. To the general public, the FIA is mostly known as the governing body for many auto racing events
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