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Mercantour National Park
Mercantour National Park
Mercantour National Park
(French: Parc national du Mercantour) is one of the ten national parks of France. Since it was created in 1979, the Mercantour Park has proven popular, with 800,000 visitors every year enjoying the 600 km of marked footpaths and visiting its villages.Contents1 Extent 2 Geography 3 Flora 4 Fauna 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksExtent[edit] The protected area covers some 685 km², consisting of a central uninhabited zone comprising seven valleys - Roya, Bévéra, Vésubie, Tinée, Haut Var/ Cians
Cians
(in the Alpes-Maritimes) plus Verdon and Ubaye (in the Alpes-de-Haute-Provence) - and a peripheral zone comprising 28 villages
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IUCN
The International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
(IUCN; officially International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
and Natural Resources[2]) is an international organization working in the field of nature conservation and sustainable use of natural resources. It is involved in data gathering and analysis, research, field projects, advocacy, and education. IUCN's mission is to "influence, encourage and assist societies throughout the world to conserve nature and to ensure that any use of natural resources is equitable and ecologically sustainable". Over the past decades, IUCN has widened its focus beyond conservation ecology and now incorporates issues related to sustainable development in its projects. Unlike many other international environmental organisations, IUCN does not itself aim to mobilize the public in support of nature conservation
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Gentian
See text Gentiana
Gentiana
/ˌdʒɛntʃiˈeɪnə/[1] is a genus of flowering plants belonging to the gentian family (Gentianaceae), the tribe Gentianeae, and the monophyletic subtribe Gentianinae. With about 400 species it is considered a large genus. They are notable for their mostly large, trumpet-shaped flowers, which are often of an intense blue.[2] The genus name is a tribute to Gentius, an Illyrian king who may have been the discoverer of tonic properties in gentians.[3]Contents1 Habitat 2 Uses2.1 Pharmacological uses 2.2 Symbolism3 Species3.1 General 3.2 List of accepted species 3.3 Formerly placed here4 Cultivation 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksHabitat[edit] Gentiana
Gentiana
frigidaThis is a cosmopolitan genus, occurring in alpine habitats in temperate regions of Asia, Europe and the Americas. Some species also occur in northwestern Africa, eastern Australia, and New Zealand
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Rhododendron
Former subgenera:Candidastrum Mumeazalea Pentanthera Tsutsusi Rhododendron
Rhododendron
/ˌroʊdəˈdɛndrən/ (from Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
ῥόδον rhódon "rose" and δένδρον déndron "tree")[3][4] is a genus of 1,024 species of woody plants in the heath family (Ericaceae), either evergreen or deciduous, and found mainly in Asia, although it is also widespread throughout the highlands of the Appalachian Mountains
Appalachian Mountains
of North America. It is the national flower of Nepal. Most species have brightly coloured flowers which bloom from late winter through to early summer.[5] Azaleas
Azaleas
make up two subgenera of Rhododendron
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Fir
See textFirs (Abies) are a genus of 48–56 species of evergreen coniferous trees in the family Pinaceae. They are found through much of North and Central America, Europe, Asia, and North Africa, occurring in mountains over most of the range. Firs are most closely related to the genus Cedrus
Cedrus
(cedar). Douglas firs are not true firs, being of the genus Pseudotsuga. They are large trees, reaching heights of 10–80 m (33–262 ft) tall and trunk diameters of 0.5–4 m (1 ft 8 in–13 ft 1 in) when mature
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Spruce
About 35; see text.A spruce is a tree of the genus Picea
Picea
/paɪˈsiːə/,[1] a genus of about 35 species of coniferous evergreen trees in the family Pinaceae, found in the northern temperate and boreal (taiga) regions of the Earth. Spruces are large trees, from about 20–60 m (about 60–200 ft) tall when mature, and can be distinguished by their whorled branches and conical form. The needles, or leaves, of spruces are attached singly to the branches in a spiral fashion, each needle on a small, peg-like structure. The needles are shed when 4–10 years old, leaving the branches rough with the retained pegs (an easy means of distinguishing them from other similar genera, where the branches are fairly smooth). Spruces are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera (moth and butterfly) species, such as the eastern spruce budworm
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Swiss Pine
Pinus cembra, also known as Swiss pine, Swiss stone pine or Arolla pine or Austrian stone pine or just Stone pine, is a species of pine tree that grows in the Alps
Alps
and Carpathian Mountains
Carpathian Mountains
of central Europe, in Poland
Poland
(Tatra Mountains), Switzerland, France, Italy, Austria, Germany, Slovenia, Slovakia
Slovakia
(Tatra Mountains), Ukraine
Ukraine
and Romania. It typically grows at 1,200 metres (3,900 ft) to 2,300 metres (7,500 ft) altitude. It often reaches the alpine tree line in this area. The mature size is typically between 25 metres (82 ft) and 35 metres (115 ft) in height, and the trunk diameter can be up to 1.5 metres (4.9 ft). The species is long-lasting and can reach an age between 500 and 1000 years
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Larch
About 10–11; see textLarches are conifers in the genus Larix, of the family Pinaceae (subfamily Laricoideae). Growing from 20 to 45 m (66 to 148 ft) tall,[1] they are native to much of the cooler temperate northern hemisphere, on lowlands in the north and high on mountains further south. Larches are among the dominant plants in the boreal forests of Siberia
Siberia
and Canada. Although they are conifers, larches are deciduous trees that lose their needles in the autumn.Contents1 Description and distribution 2 Species and taxonomy2.1 North American species 2.2 Eurasian species2.2.1 Northern Eurasian species with short bracts 2.2.2 Southern Euroasiatic species with long bracts3 Diseases 4 Uses 5 References5.1 Notes 5.2 Bibliography6 Further reading 7 External linksDescription and distribution[edit] Larches can reach 50–60 m ( Larix
Larix
occidentalis)
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Edelweiss
Leontopodium
Leontopodium
nivale, commonly called edelweiss (English pronunciation /ˈeɪdəlvaɪs/ ( listen)), is a well-known mountain flower, belonging to the Asteraceae
Asteraceae
(daisy or sunflower family). The plant prefers rocky limestone places at about 1,800–3,000 metres (5,900–9,800 ft) altitude. It is non-toxic, and has been used in traditional medicine or folk medicine as a remedy against abdominal and respiratory diseases. The dense hair appears to be an adaptation to high altitudes, protecting the plant from cold, aridity, and ultraviolet radiation.[1] As a scarce, short-lived flower found in remote mountain areas, the plant has been used as a symbol for alpinism, for rugged beauty and purity associated with the Alps
Alps
and Carpathians, and as a national symbol, especially of Romania, Austria, Bulgaria, Slovenia, and Switzerland
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Martagon Lily
Lilium
Lilium
martagon (martagon lily[2] or Turk's cap lily) is a Eurasian species of lily. It has a widespread native region extending from Portugal
Portugal
east through Europe and Asia
Asia
as far east as Mongolia.[1][3][4][5][6][7][8][9]VarietiesNumerous names have been proposed at the levels of subspecies and varieties. Only two are recognized by the World Checklist.[1] Lilium
Lilium
martagon var. martagon - from Portugal
Portugal
to Mongolia Lilium
Lilium
martagon var. pilosiusculum Freyn - Russia, Kazakhstan, Xinjiang, MongoliaContents1 Cultivation 2 Name 3 Toxicity3.1 Cats4 References 5 External linksCultivation[edit] Horticulturally it is in Division IX (true species). It is stem-rooting, growing between 1 metre (3 ft 3 in) and 2 metres (6 ft 7 in) tall
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Saxifrage
Boecherarctica Á.Löve Cascadia A.M.Johnson Micranthes
Micranthes
Haw. Zahlbrucknera Rchb. Saxifraga
Saxifraga
is the largest genus in the family Saxifragaceae, containing about 440 species of holarctic perennial plants, known as saxifrages[2] or rockfoils.[3] The Latin
Latin
word saxifraga means literally "stone-breaker", from Latin
Latin
saxum ("rock" or "stone") + frangere ("to break")
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Houseleek
Sempervivum
Sempervivum
altum Sempervivum
Sempervivum
arachnoideum
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Moss Campion
Silene acaulis, known as moss campion[1] or cushion pink, is a small mountain-dwelling wildflower that is common all over the high arctic and tundra in the higher mountains of Eurasia and North America, (south to the Alps, Carpathians, southern Siberia, Pyrenees, British Isles, Faroe Islands, Rocky Mountains). It is an evergreen perennial. It is also called the compass plant, since the flowers appear first on the south side of the cushion.[2] (Various other plants also have this name.)Contents1 Description 2 Habitat 3 Distribution and range 4 Propagation 5 Endangerment information 6 History 7 Climate warming impact 8 Hazards/toxicity 9 Gallery 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksDescription[edit]Moss campion is a low, ground-hugging plant. It may seem densely matted and moss-like.[3] The dense cushions are up to a foot or more in diameter. The plants are usually about 2" tall but may be as high as 6"
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Chamois
The chamois ( Rupicapra
Rupicapra
rupicapra) is a species of goat-antelope native to mountains in Europe, including the European Alps, the Pyrenees, the Carpathians, the Tatra Mountains, the Balkans, parts of Turkey, the Caucasus, and the Apennines.[2] The chamois has also been introduced to the South Island
South Island
of New Zealand. Some subspecies of chamois are strictly protected in the EU under the European Habitats Directive.[3]Contents1 Names 2 Taxonomy 3 Description 4 Biology and behaviour 5 Distribution and habitat 6 Chamois
Chamois
in New Zealand 7 Hunting and wildlife management 8 Chamois
Chamois
leather 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksNames[edit] Chamois
Chamois
herd engraved on reindeer antler from Gourdan grotto, Haute Garonne.The English name comes from French chamois
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Holm Oak
Quercus
Quercus
ilex, the evergreen oak,[1] holly oak[2] or holm oak, is a large evergreen oak native to the Mediterranean region. It takes its name from holm, an ancient name for holly.[3] It is a member of the white oak section of the genus, with acorns that mature in a single summer. The first trees to be grown from acorns in England are still to be found within the stately grounds of Mamhead Park, Devon. From Britton & Brayley The Beauties of England and Wales
The Beauties of England and Wales
(1803):[4]“ The woods and plantations of Mamhead are numerous and extensive
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Marmot
15, see textMarmots are large squirrels in the genus Marmota, with 15 species.Contents1 Biology 2 Subgenera and species 3 History and etymology 4 Examples of species 5 References 6 External linksBiology[edit] Some species live in mountainous areas, such as the Alps, northern Apennines, Carpathians, Tatras, and Pyrenees
Pyrenees
in Europe and northwestern Asia; the Rocky Mountains, Black Hills, the Cascade and Pacific Ranges, and the Sierra Nevada in North America; and the Deosai Plateau in Pakistan
Pakistan
and Ladakh
Ladakh
in India. Other species prefer rough grassland and can be found widely across North America
North America
and the Eurasian Steppe
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