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Meonwara
Meonwara
Meonwara
or Meonsæte is the name of a people of the Meon Valley, in southern Hampshire, England, during the late 5th century and early 6th century.[1] Meonwara
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River Meon
The River Meon
River Meon
is a river that flows through an area of Hampshire
Hampshire
in southern England
England
known as the Meon Valley, it flows generally southwards from the South Downs
South Downs
to the Solent. For most of its route it is a chalk stream, with a length of 21 miles (34 km).[2]Contents1 Course 2 Navigation 3 References 4 External linksCourse[edit] The River Meon
River Meon
rises approximately one mile (1.6 km) south of the village of East Meon. It first flows due north to that village, then northwest to West Meon, and southwest to Warnford
Warnford
before adopting its principal southwards flow. From Warnford
Warnford
the river flows through the villages of Exton, Corhampton
Corhampton
and Meonstoke, Droxford, Wickham, and Titchfield
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Isle Of Wight
The Isle of Wight
Isle of Wight
(/waɪt/; also referred to informally as IoW or The Island)[4] is a county and the largest and second-most populous island in England. It is in the English Channel, about 2 miles (3.2 km) off the coast of Hampshire, separated by the Solent. The island has resorts that have been holiday destinations since Victorian times, and is known for its mild climate, coastal scenery, and verdant landscape of fields, downland and chines. The island has been home to the poets Swinburne and Tennyson and to Queen Victoria, who built her much-loved summer residence and final home Osborne House
Osborne House
at East Cowes. It has a maritime and industrial tradition including boat-building, sail-making, the manufacture of flying boats, the hovercraft, and Britain's space rockets
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Hampshire
Hampshire
Hampshire
(/ˈhæmpʃər/, /-ʃɪər/ ( listen); abbreviated Hants)[a] is a county on the southern coast of England
England
in the United Kingdom. The county town of Hampshire
Hampshire
is Winchester, the former capital city of England.[1] Hampshire
Hampshire
is the most populous ceremonial county in the United Kingdom (excluding the metropolitan counties). Its the two largest settlements, Southampton
Southampton
and Portsmouth, are administered separately as unitary authorities. The rest of the area forms the administrative county, which is governed by Hampshire
Hampshire
County Council
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Barbara Yorke
Barbara Yorke FRHistS (born 1951) is a historian of Anglo-Saxon England. Yorke studied history and archaeology at Exeter University, where she completed both her undergraduate degree and her Ph.D. She is currently Emeritus Professor of Early Medieval History
History
at the University of Winchester, and is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society. She is an Honorary Professor of the Institute of Archaeology at University College London, and presented "King Alfred and the traditions of Anglo-Saxon kingship" at the 2011 Toller Lecture.[1] Yorke's publications include:Kings and Kingdoms of Early Anglo-Saxon England. London, Seaby, 1990. ISBN 1-85264-027-8 Wessex in the Early Middle Ages. Continuum International, 1995. ISBN 978-0-7185-1856-1 Bishop Aethelwold: His Career and Influence. The Boydell Press, 1997. ISBN 978-0-85115-705-4 The Anglo-Saxons. Sutton, 1999. ISBN 978-0-7509-2220-3 Nunneries and the Anglo-Saxon Royal Houses
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Ethnic Cleansing
Ethnic cleansing
Ethnic cleansing
is the systematic forced removal of ethnic or racial groups from a given territory by a more powerful ethnic group, often with the intent of making it ethnically homogeneous.[1][page needed] The forces applied may be various forms of forced migration (deportation, population transfer), intimidation, as well as mass murder and genocidal rape. Ethnic cleansing
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Robin Bush (historian)
Robin James Edwin Bush (12 March 1943 – 22 June 2010) was the resident historian for the first nine series of Channel 4's archaeology series Time Team, appearing in 39 episodes between 1994 and 2003. He also presented eight episodes of Time Team Extra in 1998.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Archivist and historian 3 Television appearances 4 Personal life 5 Political life 6 Death 7 Works7.1 Books and monographs 7.2 Papers in journals 7.3 Recordings8 References 9 External linksEarly life Bush was born in Hayes, Middlesex. His father was originally a schoolmaster and then a training college lecturer in Mathematics. Bush attended Exeter School in Devon between 1950 and 1962, and it was here aged 13 that he first became interested in historical research while studying the school's history
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Bede
Bede
Bede
(/biːd/ BEED; Old English: Bǣda, Bēda; 672/3 – 26 May 735), also known as Saint Bede, Venerable
Venerable
Bede, and Bede
Bede
the Venerable (Latin: Bēda Venerābilis), was an English monk at the monastery of St. Peter and its companion monastery of St. Paul in the Kingdom of Northumbria of the Angles
Angles
(contemporarily Monkwearmouth– Jarrow
Jarrow
Abbey in Tyne and Wear, England). Born on lands likely belonging to the Monkwearmouth monastery, Bede
Bede
was sent there at the age of seven and later joined Abbot
Abbot
Ceolfrith
Ceolfrith
at the Jarrow
Jarrow
monastery, both of whom survived a plague that struck in 686, an outbreak that killed a majority of the population there
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New Forest
New Forest
New Forest
National Park AuthorityRamsar WetlandDesignated 22 September 1993 The New Forest
The New Forest
is an area of southern England which includes one of the largest remaining tracts of unenclosed pasture land, heathland and forest in the heavily populated south east of England.[2] It covers southwest Hampshire
Hampshire
and extends into southeast Wiltshire
Wiltshire
and towards east Dorset. The name also refers to the New Forest
New Forest
National Park which has similar boundaries
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Ytene
New Forest National Park AuthorityRamsar WetlandDesignated 22 September 1993The New Forest is an area of southern England which includes one of the largest remaining tracts of unenclosed pasture land, heathland and forest in the heavily populated south east of England.[2] It covers southwest Hampshire and extends into southeast Wiltshire and towards east Dorset. The name also refers to the New Forest National Park which has similar boundaries
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Historia Ecclesiastica Gentis Anglorum
The Ecclesiastical History of the English People
Ecclesiastical History of the English People
(Latin: Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum), written by the Venerable Bede
Venerable Bede
in about AD 731, is a history of the Christian Churches in England, and of England
England
generally; its main focus is on the conflict between the pre-Schism Roman Rite
Roman Rite
and Celtic Christianity. It was originally composed in Latin, and is considered one of the most important original references on Anglo-Saxon history and has played a key role in the development of an English national identity
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Wihtwara
Wihtwara was the kingdom founded on the Isle of Wight, a 147-square-mile (380 km2) island off the south coast of England, during the Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain. The name was derived from the Jutish name Wihtwara ("Men of Wiht"). Its capital was a fort named Wihtwarasburgh (in or near modern Carisbrooke).Contents1 Jutish history 2 Later middle ages 3 References 4 ReferencesJutish history[edit] Wihtwara was named, supposedly, after Wihtgar who, along with Stuf, was one of the two earliest kings of Wihtwara (recorded by St Bede
St Bede
in 512)
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River Hamble
The River
River
Hamble is a river in Hampshire, England. It rises near Bishop's Waltham
Bishop's Waltham
and flows for some 7.5 miles (12 km) through Botley, Bursledon
Bursledon
and Swanwick before entering Southampton Water near Hamble-le-Rice
Hamble-le-Rice
and Warsash. The Hamble is tidal for approximately half its length and is navigable in its lower reaches, which have facilitated shipbuilding activities since medieval times
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Maël
Mael is an old Celtic name from Ireland, Wales and Brittany. Nowadays this first name is popular in France. The French masculine name of Breton origin meaning "chief, prince." It was popularized by a fifth-century saint Maël who lived in Wales.[1] It was also borne by Máel Sechnaill mac Domnaill (975/976-1022), a High King of Ireland. Both a boys name and a girls name, although it seems traditionally more used on boys. Its feminine form in Breton is Maela, but the modern French variant Maëlle is often preferred
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