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Mental Illness And Psychology
Paul- Michel Foucault
Michel Foucault
(15 October 1926 – 25 June 1984), generally known as Michel Foucault
Michel Foucault
(French: [miʃɛl fuko]), was a French philosopher, historian of ideas, social theorist, and literary critic. Foucault's theories primarily address the relationship between power and knowledge, and how they are used as a form of social control through societal institutions. Though often cited as a post-structuralist and postmodernist, Foucault rejected these labels, preferring to present his thought as a critical history of modernity. His thought has influenced academics, especially those working in communication studies, sociology, cultural studies, literary theory, feminism, and critical theory
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Poitiers
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Poitiers
Poitiers
([pwatje] ( listen)) is a city on the Clain
Clain
river in west-central France. It is a commune and the capital of the Vienne department and also of the Poitou. Poitiers
Poitiers
is a major university centre. The centre of town is picturesque and its streets include predominantly historical architecture, especially religious architecture and especially from the Romanesque period
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Episteme (Foucault)
"Episteme" is a philosophical term derived from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
word ἐπιστήμη epistēmē, which can refer to knowledge, science or understanding, and which comes from the verb ἐπίστασθαι, meaning "to know, to understand, or to be acquainted with".[1] Plato contrasts episteme with "doxa":[2] common belief or opinion
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Ethics
Ethics
Ethics
or moral philosophy is a branch of philosophy that involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong conduct.[1] The term ethics derives from Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
ἠθικός (ethikos), from ἦθος (ethos), meaning 'habit, custom'. The branch of philosophy axiology comprises the sub-branches of ethics and aesthetics, each concerned with values.[2] Ethics
Ethics
seeks to resolve questions of human morality by defining concepts such as good and evil, right and wrong, virtue and vice, justice and crime
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Political Philosophy
Political philosophy, or political theory, is the study of topics such as politics, liberty, justice, property, rights, law, and the enforcement of laws by authority: what they are, why (or even if) they are needed, what, if anything, makes a government legitimate, what rights and freedoms it should protect and why, what form it should take and why, what the law is, and what duties citizens owe to a legitimate government, if any, and when it may be legitimately overthrown, if ever. In a vernacular sense, the term "political philosophy" often refers to a general view, or specific ethic, political belief or attitude, about politics, synonymous to the term "political ideology". Political philosophy
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Philosophy Of Literature
Philosophy
Philosophy
and literature involves the literary treatment of philosophers and philosophical themes (the literature of philosophy), and the philosophical treatment of issues raised by literature (the philosophy of literature). The Clouds
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Philosophy Of Technology
The philosophy of technology is a sub-field of philosophy that studies the nature of technology and its social effects. Philosophical discussion of questions relating to technology (or its Greek ancestor techne) dates back to the very dawn of Western philosophy.[1] The phrase "philosophy of technology" was first used in the late 19th century by German-born philosopher and geographer Ernst Kapp, who published a book titled "Grundlinien einer Philosophie der Technik".[2][3]Contents1 History1.1 Greek philosophy 1.2 Middle ages to 19th century 1.3 19th century 1.4 20th century to present 1.5 Technology
Technology
and neutrality2 See also 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External links5.1 Journals 5.2 WebsitesHistory[edit] Greek philosophy[edit] The western term 'technology' comes from the Greek term techne (τέχνη) (art, or craft knowledge) and philosophical views on technology can be traced to the very roots of Western philosophy
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Biopower
Biopower (or biopouvoir in French) is a term coined by French scholar, historian, and social theorist Michel Foucault. It relates to the practice of modern nation states and their regulation of their subjects through "an explosion of numerous and diverse techniques for achieving the subjugations of bodies and the control of populations".[1] Foucault first used the term in his lecture courses at the Collège de France,[2][3] but the term first appeared in print in The Will To Knowledge, Foucault's first volume of The History of Sexuality.[4] In Foucault's work, it has been used to refer to practices of public health, regulation of heredity, and risk regulation, among many other regulatory mechanisms often linked less directly with literal physical health
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Biopolitics
Biopolitics is an intersectional field between biology and politics. The term was coined by Rudolf Kjellén, who also coined the term geopolitics,[1] in his 1905 two-volume work The Great Powers.[2] In contemporary US political science studies, usage of the term is mostly divided between a poststructuralist group using the meaning assigned by Michel Foucault
Michel Foucault
(denoting social and political power over life) and another group who uses it to denote studies relating biology and political science.[3]Contents1 Various definitions 2 In the colonial setting 3 Michel Foucault 4 Notes 5 Further reading 6 External linksVarious definitions[edit]In Kjellén's organicist view, the state was a quasi-biological organism, a "super-individual creature"
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Disciplinary Institution
Disciplinary institutions (French: institution disciplinaire) is a concept proposed by Michel Foucault
Michel Foucault
in Discipline and Punish (1975). School, prison, barracks, or the hospital are examples of historical disciplinary institutions, all created in their modern form in the 19th century with the Industrial Revolution
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Foucauldian Discourse Analysis
Foucauldian discourse analysis is a form of discourse analysis, focusing on power relationships in society as expressed through language and practices, and based on the theories of Michel Foucault.Contents1 Subject 2 Process 3 Areas of study 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingSubject[edit] Besides focusing on the meaning of a given discourse, the distinguishing characteristic of this approach is its stress on power relationships. These are expressed through language and behavior, and the relationship between language and power.[1][2] This form of analysis developed out of Foucault's genealogical work, where power was linked to the formation of discourse within specific historical periods
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Discursive Formation
Discourse
Discourse
(from Latin
Latin
discursus, "running to and from") denotes written and spoken communications:In semantics and discourse analysis:
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Dispositif
Dispositif is a term used by the French intellectual Michel Foucault, generally to refer to the various institutional, physical, and administrative mechanisms and knowledge structures which enhance and maintain the exercise of power within the social body.Contents1 Translation 2 Definition2.1 Agamben's delineation3 References 4 Further readingTranslation[edit] Dispositif is translated variously, even in the same book, as 'device', 'machinery', 'apparatus', 'construction', and 'deployment'. Definition[edit] Foucault uses the term in his 1977 "The Confession of the Flesh" interview, where he answers the question
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Genealogy (philosophy)
In philosophy, genealogy is a historical technique in which one questions the commonly understood emergence of various philosophical and social beliefs by attempting to account for the scope, breadth or totality of Discourse, thus extending the possibility of analysis, as opposed to the Marxist
Marxist
use of the term Ideology
Ideology
to explain the totality of historical discourse within the time period in question by focusing on a singular or dominant discourse (ideology). Moreover, a genealogy often attempts to look beyond the discourse in question toward the conditions of their possibility (particularly in Foucault's genealogies)
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Epistemology
Related concepts and fundamentals:Agnosticism Epistemology Presupposition Probabilityv t e Epistemology
Epistemology
(/ɪˌpɪstɪˈmɒlədʒi/ ( listen); from Greek ἐπιστήμη, epistēmē, meaning 'knowledge', and λόγος, logos, meaning 'logical discourse') is the branch of philosophy concerned with the theory of knowledge.[1] Epistemology
Epistemology
studies the nature of knowledge, justification, and the rationality of belief. Much of the debate in epistemology centers on four areas: (1) the philosophical analysis of the nature of knowledge and how it relates to such concepts as truth, belief, and justification,[2][3] (2) various problems of skepticism, (3) the sources and scope of knowledge and justified belief, and (4) the criteria for knowledge and justification
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Governmentality
Governmentality is a concept first developed by the French philosopher Michel Foucault
Michel Foucault
in the later years of his life, roughly between 1977 and his death in 1984, particularly in his lectures at the Collège de France during this time. The concept has been elaborated further from an "Anglo-Neo Foucauldian" perspective in the social sciences, especially by authors such as Peter Miller, Nikolas Rose, and Mitchell Dean
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