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Menander
Menander
Menander
(/məˈnændər/; Greek: Μένανδρος, Menandros; c. 342/41 – c. 290 BC) was a Greek dramatist and the best-known representative of Athenian New Comedy.[1] He wrote 108 comedies[2] and took the prize at the Lenaia festival eight times.[3] His record at the City Dionysia
City Dionysia
is unknown but may well have been similarly spectacular. One of the most popular writers of antiquity, his work was lost during the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and is known in modernity in highly fragmentary form, much of which was discovered in the 20th century
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Ovid
Publius Ovidius Naso (Classical Latin: [ˈpu:.blɪ.ʊs ɔˈwɪ.dɪ.ʊs ˈnaː.soː]; 20 March 43 BC – AD 17/18), known as Ovid
Ovid
(/ˈɒvɪd/)[1] in the English-speaking world, was a Roman poet who lived during the reign of Augustus. He was a contemporary of the older Virgil
Virgil
and Horace, with whom he is often ranked as one of the three canonical poets of Latin
Latin
literature. The Imperial scholar Quintilian
Quintilian
considered him the last of the Latin
Latin
love elegists.[2] He enjoyed enormous popularity, but, in one of the mysteries of literary history, was sent by Augustus
Augustus
into exile in a remote province on the Black Sea, where he remained until his death
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Thracian Chersonese
Coordinates: 40°21′N 26°28′E / 40.350°N 26.467°E / 40.350; 26.467Satellite image of the Gallipoli
Gallipoli
peninsula and surrounding areaA view of the Dardanelles
Dardanelles
from a shipThe Gallipoli
Gallipoli
peninsula (/ɡəˈlɪpəli, ɡæ-/;[1] Turkish: Gelibolu Yarımadası; Greek: Χερσόνησος της Καλλίπολης) is located in the southern part of East Thrace, the European part of Turkey, with the Aegean Sea
Aegean Sea
to the west and the Dardanelles
Dardanelles
strait to the east. Gallipoli
Gallipoli
is the Italian form of the Greek name "Καλλίπολις" (Kallípolis), meaning "Beautiful City",[2] the original name of the modern town of Gelibolu
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Charisius
Flavius Sosipater Charisius (fl. 4th century AD) was a Latin grammarian. He was probably an African by birth, summoned to Constantinople
Constantinople
to take the place of Euanthius, a learned commentator on Terence.[1] The Ars Grammatica of Charisius, in five books, addressed to his son (not a Roman, as the preface shows), has come down to us in a mutilated condition, the beginning of the first, part of the fourth, and the greater part of the fifth book having been lost.[1] The work, which is merely a compilation, is valuable as containing excerpts from the earlier writers on grammar, who are in many cases mentioned by name: Remmius Palaemon, Julius Romanus, Comminianus.[1] The edition of Heinrich Keil, in Grammatici Latini, i. (1857), has been superseded by that of Karl Barwick (1925). References[edit]^ a b c  Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Charisius, Flavius Sosipater". Encyclopædia Britannica. 5 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press
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Quintilian
Marcus Fabius Quintilianus (c. 35 – c. 100 AD) was a Roman rhetorician from Hispania, widely referred to in medieval schools of rhetoric and in Renaissance
Renaissance
writing. In English translation, he is usually referred to as Quintilian
Quintilian
(/kwɪnˈtɪliən/), although the alternate spellings of Quintillian and Quinctilian are occasionally seen, the latter in older texts.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Institutio Oratoria 4 Placement of Quintilian's rhetoric 5 Influence of Quintilian 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksLife[edit] Quintilian
Quintilian
was born c. 35 in Calagurris (Calahorra, La Rioja) in Hispania. His father, a well-educated man, sent him to Rome
Rome
to study rhetoric early in the reign of Nero. While there, he cultivated a relationship with Domitius Afer, who died in 59
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Constantinople
Κωνσταντινούπολις (in Greek) Constantinopolis (in Latin)Map of ConstantinopleShown within Asia
Asia
MinorAlternate name Byzantion (earlier Greek name), Miklagard/Miklagarth (Old Norse), Tsarigrad (Slavic), Basileuousa ("Queen of Cities"), Megalopolis ("the Great City")Location Istanbul, Istanbul
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Antiphanes (comic Poet)
Antiphanes (Ancient Greek: Ἀντιφάνης; c. 408 to 334 BCE) is regarded[by whom?] as the most important writer of the Middle Attic comedy with the exception of Alexis.[1] He was apparently a foreigner (perhaps from Cius
Cius
on the Propontis, Smyrna
Smyrna
or Rhodes[2]) and, by some accounts, was the child of slaves.[3] He settled in Athens, where he began to write about 387. He was extremely prolific: more than 200 of the 365 (or 260) comedies attributed to him are known from the titles and considerable fragments preserved in Athenaeus.[1] His plays chiefly deal with matters connected to mythological subjects, although others referenced particular professional and national persons or characters, while other plays focused on the intrigues of personal life
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Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
is the "wrongful appropriation" and "stealing and publication" of another author's "language, thoughts, ideas, or expressions" and the representation of them as one's own original work.[1][2] Plagiarism
Plagiarism
is considered academic dishonesty and a breach of journalistic ethics. It is subject to sanctions like penalties, suspension, and even expulsion. Recently, cases of "extreme plagiarism" have been identified in academia.[3] The modern concept of plagiarism as immoral and originality as an ideal emerged in Europe in the 18th century, particularly with the Romantic movement. Plagiarism
Plagiarism
is not in itself a crime, but can constitute copyright infringement
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Praeparatio Evangelica
Preparation for the Gospel (Greek: Εὐαγγελικὴ προπαρασκευή), commonly known by its Latin
Latin
title Praeparatio evangelica, was a work of Christian apologetics written by Eusebius
Eusebius
in the early part of the fourth century AD
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Eusebius Of Caesarea
Eusebius
Eusebius
of Caesarea (/juːˈsiːbiəs/; Greek: Εὐσέβιος τῆς Καισαρείας, Eusébios tés Kaisareías; AD 260/265 – 339/340), also known as Eusebius
Eusebius
Pamphili (from the Greek: Εὐσέβιος τοῦ Παμϕίλου), was a historian of Christianity, exegete, and Christian polemicist. He became the bishop of Caesarea Maritima
Caesarea Maritima
about 314 AD. Together with Pamphilus, he was a scholar of the Biblical canon
Biblical canon
and is regarded as an extremely learned Christian of his time.[1] He wrote Demonstrations of the Gospel, Preparations for the Gospel, and On Discrepancies between the Gospels, studies of the Biblical text
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Porphyry (philosopher)
Porphyry of Tyre (/ˈpɔːrfəri/; Greek: Πορφύριος, Porphýrios; Arabic: فرفوريوس‎, Furfūriyūs; c. 234 – c. 305 AD) was a Neoplatonic philosopher who was born in Tyre, in the Roman Empire.[1] He edited and published the Enneads, the only collection of the work of his teacher Plotinus
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Caecilius Of Calacte
Caecilius (/sɪˈsiːliəs/), of Calacte in Sicily, Greek rhetorician, flourished at Rome during the reign of Augustus. Originally called Archagathus (Greek: Ἀρχάγαθος), he took the name of Caecilius from his patron, one of the Metelli. According to the Suda, he was of the Jewish faith
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Aulus Gellius
Aulus Gellius
Aulus Gellius
(c. 125 – after 180 AD) was a Latin
Latin
author and grammarian, who was probably born and certainly brought up in Rome. He was educated in Athens, after which he returned to Rome, where he held a judicial office. He is famous for his Attic Nights, a commonplace book, or compilation of notes on grammar, philosophy, history, antiquarianism, and other subjects, preserving fragments of the works of many authors who might otherwise be unknown today.Contents1 Life 2 Writings 3 Editions 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 Further reading7.1 Translations 7.2 Studies8 External linksLife[edit] The only source for the life of Aulus Gellius
Aulus Gellius
is the details recorded in his writings.[1] He was of good family and connections, possibly of African origin,[2] but he was probably born and certainly brought up in Rome
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Gaius Marius
Gaius Marius[nb 1] (/ˈɡeɪəs ˈmɛəriəs, ˈmær-/; 157 BC – January 13, 86 BC) was a Roman general and statesman. He held the office of consul an unprecedented seven times during his career. He was also noted for his important reforms of Roman armies, authorizing recruitment of landless citizens, eliminating the manipular military formations, and reorganizing the structure of the legions into separate cohorts
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Vatican City
Vatican City
City
(/ˈvætɪkən ˈsɪti/ ( listen); Italian: Città del Vaticano [tʃitˈta del vatiˈkaːno]; Latin: Civitas Vaticana),[d] officially Vatican City
City
State or State of Vatican City (Italian: Stato della Città del Vaticano;[e] Latin: Status Civitatis Vaticanae),[f] is an independent state located within the city of Rome. With an area of 44 hectares (110 acres), and a population of about 1,000,[3] it is the smallest state in the world by both area and population. However, formally it is not sovereign, with sovereignty being held by the Holy See. It is an ecclesiastical[3] or sacerdotal-monarchical[7] state (a type of theocracy) ruled by the Bishop of Rome
Rome
– the Pope. The highest state functionaries are all Catholic clergy of various national origins
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Pausanias (geographer)
Pausanias (/pɔːˈseɪniəs/; Greek: Παυσανίας Pausanías; c. AD 110 – c. 180)[1] was a Greek traveler and geographer of the second century AD, who lived in the time of Roman emperors Hadrian, Antoninus Pius, and Marcus Aurelius. He is famous for his Description of Greece (Ancient Greek: Ἑλλάδος Περιήγησις, Hellados Periegesis),[2] a lengthy work that describes ancient Greece from his first-hand observations. This work provides crucial information for making links between classical literature and modern archaeology. Andrew Stewart assesses him as:A careful, pedestrian writer...interested not only in the grandiose or the exquisite but in unusual sights and obscure ritual
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