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Memory
Memory
Memory
is the faculty of the mind by which information is encoded, stored, and retrieved. Memory
Memory
is vital to experiences and related to limbic systems, it is the retention of information over time for the purpose of influencing future action.[1] If we could not remember past events, we could not learn or develop language, relationships, nor personal identity (Eysenck, 2012). Often memory is understood as an informational processing system with explicit and implicit functioning that is made up of a sensory processor, short-term (or working) memory, and long-term memory (Baddely, 2007).[better source needed] This can be related to the neuron
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Pasko Rakic
Pasko Rakic
Pasko Rakic
(Croatian: Paško Rakić) is a Yugoslav-born American neuroscientist, who presently works in the Yale School of Medicine Department of Neuroscience
Neuroscience
in New Haven, Connecticut. His main research interest is in the development and evolution of the human brain. He was the founder and served as Chairman of the Department of Neurobiology at Yale for 37 years, and was founder and Director of the Kavli Institute for Neuroscience
Neuroscience
for 10 years. He is best known for elucidating the mechanisms involved in development of the cerebral cortex
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Rehabilitation (neuropsychology)
Rehabilitation of sensory and cognitive function typically involves methods for retraining neural pathways or training new neural pathways to regain or improve neurocognitive functioning that has been diminished by disease or trauma. Three common neuropsychological problems treatable with rehabilitation are attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), concussion, and spinal cord injury. Rehabilitation research and practices are a fertile area for clinical neuropsychologists and others.Contents1 Methods 2 Concussion 3 See also 4 ReferencesMethods[edit] Speech therapy, occupational therapy, and other methods that "exercise" specific brain functions are used
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Patricia Goldman-Rakic
Patricia
Patricia
/pəˈtrɪʃə/ is a common female given name of Latin origin. Derived from the Latin
Latin
word patrician, meaning "noble", it is the feminine form of the masculine given name Patrick. The name Patricia
Patricia
was the second most common female name in the United States according to the 1990 US Census.[1] It is commonly shortened to "Pat", "Patsy", "Patti"/"Pattie", "Trish" or "Trisha"/"Tricia". These diminutives are sometimes used as names in their own right
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Elkhonon Goldberg
Goldberg
Goldberg
or Goldberger may refer to:Contents1 Places 2 People 3 Entertainment 4 Music 5 Companies 6 Science 7 Other 8 See alsoPlaces[edit]Goldberg, Germany Złotoryja, Poland (German name: Goldberg)People[edit] Goldberg
Goldberg
(surname), people with the surname Goldberg Goldberg, ring name
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Planning
Planning
Planning
is the process of thinking about the activities required to achieve a desired goal. It involves the creation and maintenance of a plan, such as psychological aspects that require conceptual skills. There are even a couple of tests to measure someone’s capability of planning well. As such, planning is a fundamental property of intelligent behavior. Also, planning has a specific process and is necessary for multiple occupations (particularly in fields such as management, business, etc.). In each field there are different types of plans that help companies achieve efficiency and effectiveness. An important, albeit often ignored aspect of planning, is the relationship it holds to forecasting. Forecasting can be described as predicting what the future will look like, whereas planning predicts what the future should look like for multiple scenarios
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Motor Coordination
Motor coordination is the combination of body movements created with the kinematic (such as spatial direction) and kinetic (force) parameters that result in intended actions. Motor coordination is achieved when subsequent parts of the same movement, or the movements of several limbs or body parts are combined in a manner that is well timed, smooth, and efficient with respect to the intended goal. This involves the integration of proprioceptive information detailing the position and movement of the musculoskeletal system with the neural processes in the brain and spinal cord which control, plan, and relay motor commands
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Oliver Sacks
Oliver Wolf Sacks, CBE, FRCP (9 July 1933 – 30 August 2015) was a British neurologist, naturalist, historian of science, and author. Born in Britain, and mostly educated there, he spent his career in the United States. He believed that the brain is the "most incredible thing in the universe."[1] He became widely known for writing best-selling case histories about both his patients' and his own disorders and unusual experiences, with some of his books adapted for plays by major playwrights, feature films, animated short films, opera, dance, fine art, and musical works in the classical genre.[2][3] After Sacks received his medical degree from The Queen's College, Oxford in 1960, he interned at Middlesex Hospital
Middlesex Hospital
(part of University College, London) before moving to the U.S
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Mark Rosenzweig
Mark Richard Rosenzweig (September 12, 1922 – July 20, 2009) was an American research psychologist whose research on neuroplasticity in animals indicated that the adult brain remains capable of anatomical remodelling and reorganization based on life experiences, overturning the conventional wisdom that the brain reached full maturity in childhood.Contents1 Early life and education 2 University of California, Berkeley 3 Personal life and death 4 ReferencesEarly life and education[edit] Rosenzweig was born on September 12, 1922, in Rochester, New York, to Jews of Eastern European origin,[1] in which his bilingual parents (his lawyer father and homemaker mother spoke both English and German) helped foster an interest in language and learning.[2] He attended the University of Rochester
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Kenneth Heilman
Kenneth is an English given name and surname. The name is an Anglicised form of two entirely different Gaelic personal names: Cainnech and Cináed. The modern Gaelic form of Cainnech is Coinneach; the name was derived from a byname meaning "handsome", "comely".[1] The name Cinaed is partly derived from the Celtic *aidhu, meaning "fire".[2] A short form of Kenneth is Ken or Kenn
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Decision-making
In psychology, decision-making (also spelled decision making and decisionmaking) is regarded as the cognitive process resulting in the selection of a belief or a course of action among several alternative possibilities. Every decision-making process produces a final choice, which may or may not prompt action. Decision-making
Decision-making
is the process of identifying and choosing alternatives based on the values, preferences and beliefs of the decision-maker.Contents1 Overview 2 Problem analysis2.1 Analysis paralysis 2.2 Information overload 2.3 Post-decision analysis3 Decision-making
Decision-making
techniques3.1 Group 3.2 Individual4 Steps4.1 GOFER 4.2 DECIDE 4.3 Other 4.4 Group stages5 Rational and irrational 6 Cognitive and personal biases 7 Cognitive limitations in groups 8 Cognitive styles8.1 Optimizing
Optimizing
vs. satisficing 8.2 Intuitive vs. rational 8.3 Combinatorial vs
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Neuroanatomy
Neuroanatomy
Neuroanatomy
is the study of the anatomy and stereotyped organization of nervous systems. In contrast to animals with radial symmetry, whose nervous system consists of a distributed network of cells, animals with bilateral symmetry have segregated, defined nervous systems. Their neuroanatomy is therefore better understood. In vertebrates, the nervous system is segregated into the internal structure of the brain and spinal cord (together called the central nervous system, or CNS) and the routes of the nerves that connect to the rest of the body (known as the peripheral nervous system, or PNS). The delineation of distinct structures and regions of the nervous system has been critical in investigating how it works
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Hans-Lukas Teuber
Teyber is a surname. The most prominent people with the surname were an Austrian family of musicians. They also spelled their name many different ways, including Deiber, Taiber, Taube, Tauber, Täuber, Tayber, Teiber, and Teuber.[1] Notable members of this family include:Matthäus Teyber (ru) (c. 1711-1785), violinist and court musician Anton Teyber (1756–1822), organist, pianist, Kapellmeister and composer, son of Matthäus Elena Asachi, née Teyber, (1789-1877), pianist, singer and composer, daughter of Anton Franz Teyber (1758–1810), Austrian organist, Kapellmeister and composer, son of Matthäus Elisabeth Teyber (1744-1816), operatic soprano, son of Matthäus Therese Teyber (1760-1830), operatic soprano, son of MatthäusReferences[edit]^ Peter Branscombe. "Teyber". In L. Root, Deane. Grove Music Online. Oxford Music Online
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Edith Kaplan
Edith F. Kaplan (February 16, 1924 – September 3, 2009) was an American psychologist. She was a pioneer of neuropsychological tests and did most of her work at the Boston VA Hospital.[1] Kaplan is known for her promotion of clinical neuropsychology as a specialty area in psychology. She examined brain-behavioral relationships in aphasia, apraxia, developmental issues in clinical neuropsychology, as well as normal and abnormal aging. Kaplan helped develop a new method of assessing brain function with neuropsychological assessment, called "The Boston Process Approach."[2] As a graduate student Kaplan worked with Heinz Werner, and then collaborated further with Norman Geschwind and Harold Goodglass.Contents1 Personal history 2 Mentorship 3 Clinical contributions 4 Professional achievements and awards 5 Selected publications 6 References 7 External linksPersonal history[edit] Kaplan was born in Brooklyn, New York
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Traumatic Brain Injury
Traumatic brain injury
Traumatic brain injury
(TBI), also known as intracranial injury, occurs when an external force injures the brain. TBI can be classified based on severity, mechanism (closed or penetrating head injury), or other features (e.g., occurring in a specific location or over a widespread area). Head injury
Head injury
is a broader category that may involve damage to other structures such as the scalp and skull. TBI can result in physical, cognitive, social, emotional, and behavioral symptoms, and outcome can range from complete recovery to permanent disability or death. Causes include falls, vehicle collisions, and violence. Brain trauma occurs as a consequence of a sudden acceleration or deceleration within the cranium or by a complex combination of both movement and sudden impact
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