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Memories Of Murder
Memories of Murder
Memories of Murder
(Hangul: 살인의 추억; RR: Salinui chueok) is a 2003 South Korean crime-drama film co-written and directed by Bong Joon-ho. It is based on the true story of Korea's first serial murders in history, which took place between 1986 and 1991 in Hwaseong, Gyeonggi Province. Song Kang-ho
Song Kang-ho
and Kim Sang-kyung star as Detective Park and Detective Seo, respectively, two of the detectives trying to solve the crimes. The film was the second feature film directed by Bong, following his 2000 debut film Barking Dogs Never Bite. The screenplay was adapted by Bong and Shim Sung-bo
Shim Sung-bo
from Kim Kwang-rim's 1996 stage play about the same subject
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Cinematography
Cinematography
Cinematography
(also called Direction of Photography) is the science or art of motion-picture photography by recording light or other electromagnetic radiation, either electronically by means of an image sensor, or chemically by means of a light-sensitive material such as film stock.[1] Typically, cinematographers use a lens to repeatedly focus the light reflected from objects into real images on the light-sensitive surface inside a camera during a questioned[citation needed] exposure, creating multiple images. With an electronic image-sensor, this produces an electrical charge at each pixel, which is electronically processed and stored in a video file for subsequent display or processing. The result with photographic emulsion is a series of invisible latent images on the film stock, which are later chemically "developed" into a visible image
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Eye Contact
Eye contact
Eye contact
occurs when two people look at each other's eyes at the same time.[1] In human beings, eye contact is a form of nonverbal communication and is thought to have a large influence on social behavior
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Cannes Film Festival
The Cannes
Cannes
Festival (/kæn/; French: Festival de Cannes), named until 2002 as the International Film Festival (Festival international du film) and known in English as the Cannes
Cannes
Film Festival, is an annual film festival held in Cannes, France, which previews new films of all genres, including documentaries, from all around the world. Founded in 1946, the invitation-only festival is held annually (usually in May) at the Palais des Festivals et des Congrès.[1] On 1 July 2014, co-founder and former head of French pay-TV operator Canal+, Pierre Lescure, took over as President of the Festival, while Thierry Fremaux
Thierry Fremaux
became the General Delegate. The board of directors also appointed Gilles Jacob as Honorary President of the Festival.[2][3] The 2017 Cannes
Cannes
Film Festival, its 70th anniversary, took place between 17 and 29 May 2017
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Screenplay
A screenplay or script is a written work by screenwriters for a film, video game, or television program. These screenplays can be original works or adaptations from existing pieces of writing. In them, the movement, actions, expression, and dialogues of the characters are also narrated
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Play (theatre)
A play is a form of literature written by a playwright, usually consisting of dialogue between characters, intended for theatrical performance rather than just reading. Plays are performed at a variety of levels, from Broadway, Off-Broadway, regional theater, to Community theatre, as well as university or school productions. There are rare dramatists, notably George Bernard Shaw, who have had little preference as to whether their plays were performed or read
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Hangul
Hangul
Hangul
(/ˈhɑːnˌɡuːl/ HAHN-gool;[1] from Korean hangeul 한글 [ha(ː)n.ɡɯl]) is the Korean alphabet. It has been used to write the Korean language
Korean language
since its creation in the 15th century under Sejong the Great.[2][3] It is the official writing system of South Korea
South Korea
and North Korea. It is a co-official writing system in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture and Changbai Korean Autonomous County
Changbai Korean Autonomous County
in Jilin
Jilin
Province, China. It is sometimes used to write the Cia-Cia language
Cia-Cia language
spoken near the town of Bau-Bau, Indonesia. The alphabet consists of 19 consonants and 21 vowels. Hangul
Hangul
letters are grouped into syllabic blocks, vertically and horizontally
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Rape
Rape
Rape
is a type of sexual assault usually involving sexual intercourse or other forms of sexual penetration carried out against a person without that person's consent. The act may be carried out by physical force, coercion, abuse of authority, or against a person who is incapable of giving valid consent, such as one who is unconscious, incapacitated, has an intellectual disability or is below the legal age of consent.[1][2][3] The term rape is sometimes used interchangeably with the term sexual assault.[4] The rate of reporting, prosecuting and convicting for rape varies between jurisdictions
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Evidence
Evidence, broadly construed, is anything presented in support of an assertion.[1] This support may be strong or weak. The strongest type of evidence is that which provides direct proof of the truth of an assertion. At the other extreme is evidence that is merely consistent with an assertion but does not rule out other, contradictory assertions, as in circumstantial evidence. In law, rules of evidence govern the types of evidence that are admissible in a legal proceeding. Types of legal evidence include testimony, documentary evidence,[2] and physical evidence.[3] The parts of a legal case which are not in controversy are known, in general, as the "facts of the case." Beyond any facts that are undisputed, a judge or jury is usually tasked with being a trier of fact for the other issues of a case. Evidence
Evidence
and rules are used to decide questions of fact that are disputed, some of which may be determined by the legal burden of proof relevant to the case
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Forensic Science
Forensic science
Forensic science
is the application of science to criminal and civil laws, mainly—on the criminal side—during criminal investigation, as governed by the legal standards of admissible evidence and criminal procedure. Forensic scientists collect, preserve, and analyze scientific evidence during the course of an investigation. While some forensic scientists travel to the scene of the crime to collect the evidence themselves, others occupy a laboratory role, performing analysis on objects brought to them by other individuals.[1] In addition to their laboratory role, forensic scientists testify as expert witnesses in both criminal and civil cases and can work for either the prosecution or the defense. While any field could technically be forensic, certain sections have developed over time to encompass the majority of forensically related cases.[2] Forensic science is the combination of two different Latin words: forensis and science
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Mental Retardation
Intellectual disability
Intellectual disability
(ID), also known as general learning disability,[3] and mental retardation (MR),[4][5] is a generalized neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by significantly impaired intellectual and adaptive functioning. It is defined by an IQ under 70 in addition to deficits in two or more adaptive behaviors that affect everyday, general living. Once focused almost entirely on cognition, the definition now includes both a component relating to mental functioning and one relating to individuals' functional skills in their environments
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Hwaseong City
GyeonggiMetropolitan area SudogwonAdministrative divisions 4 eup, 9 myeon, 13 dongArea • Total 689.48 km2 (266.21 sq mi)Population (December 31, 2016) • Total 640,890 • Density 929.53/km2 (2,407.5/sq mi) • Dialect SeoulHwaseong (Korean pronunciation: [hwa.sʌŋ]) is a city in Gyeonggi Province, South Korea. It has the largest area of farmland of any city or county in Gyeonggi Province.[1] Seoul Subway Line 1 passes through Hwaseong, stopping at Byeongjeom Station.Contents1 History1.1 Universal Studios2 Climate 3 Demographics 4 Local products 5 Symbols 6 Notable people 7 Sister cities 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] Universal Studios[edit] On November 27, 2007 the city was chosen as the site for the future Universal Studios South Korea theme park
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Seoul
Seoul
Seoul
(/soʊl/; 서울; Korean: [sʌ.ul] ( listen)), officially the Seoul
Seoul
Special
Special
Metropolitan City – is the capital[10] and largest metropolis of the Republic of Korea
Korea
(commonly known as South Korea).[1] Seoul
Seoul
forms the heart of the Seoul
Seoul
Capital Area, and includes the surrounding Incheon
Incheon
metropolis and Gyeonggi province, altogether home to roughly half of the country's population.[11][12] Strategically situated on the Han River, Seoul's history stretches back over two thousand years, when it was founded in 18 BC by the people of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. The city was later designated the capital of Korea
Korea
under the Joseon
Joseon
dynasty
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Tetanus
Tetanus, also known as lockjaw, is an infection characterized by muscle spasms.[1] In the most common type, the spasms begin in the jaw and then progress to the rest of the body.[1] These spasms usually last a few minutes each time and occur frequently for three to four weeks.[1] Spasms may be so severe that bone fractures may occur.[6] Other symptoms may include fever, sweating, headache, trouble swallowing, high blood pressure, and a fast heart rate.[1][6] Onset of symptoms is typically three to twenty-one days following infection.[1] It may take months to recover.[1] About 10% of those infected die.[1] Tetanus
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin) (de facto) "Out of many, one" "Annuit cœptis" (Latin) "He h
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DNA Profiling
DNA
DNA
profiling (also called DNA
DNA
fingerprinting, DNA
DNA
testing, or DNA typing) is the process of determining an individual's DNA characteristics, called a DNA
DNA
profile, that is very likely to be different in unrelated individuals, thereby being as unique to individuals as are fingerprints (hence the alternative name for the technique)
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