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Melbourne Town Hall
Melbourne
Melbourne
Town
Town
Hall is the central municipal building of the City of Melbourne, Australia, in the State of Victoria. It is located on the northeast corner of Swanston and Collins Streets, in the central business district. It is the seat of the local government area of the City of Melbourne. It has been used for multiple purposes such as concerts, theatrical plays and exhibitions.Contents1 History 2 Architecture 3 Tourism 4 Notes 5 External linksHistory[edit] Melbourne
Melbourne
Town
Town
Hall, 1910 Melbourne
Melbourne
was officially incorporated as a town on 13 December 1842, with Henry Condell as its first Mayor. However, it wasn't until 1854 that its first Town
Town
Hall was completed. Begun in 1851, the work ground to a halt with the beginning of the Victorian gold rush
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Joseph Reed (architect)
Joseph
Joseph
is a masculine given name originating from Hebrew, recorded in the Hebrew Bible, as יוֹסֵף‬, Standard Hebrew
Standard Hebrew
Yossef, Tiberian Hebrew and Aramaic
Aramaic
Yôsēp̄
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Ballroom Dance
Ballroom dance
Ballroom dance
is a set of partner dances, which are enjoyed both socially and competitively around the world. Because of its performance and entertainment aspects, ballroom dance is also widely enjoyed on stage, film, and television. Ballroom dance
Ballroom dance
may refer, at its widest definition, to almost any type of partner dancing as recreation. However, with the emergence of dancesport in modern times, the term has become narrower in scope, and traditionally refers to the five International Standard and five International Latin style dances (see dance categories below). The two styles, while differing in technique, rhythm and costumes, exemplify core elements of ballroom dancing such as control and cohesiveness. Developed in England,[1] the two styles are now regulated by the World Dance
Dance
Council (WDC) and the World DanceSport Federation (WDSF)
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The Argus (Melbourne)
The Argus was a morning daily newspaper in Melbourne, Australia that was established in 1846 and closed in 1957. It was considered to be the general Australian newspaper of record for this period.[1] Widely known as a conservative newspaper for most of its history, it adopted a left-leaning approach from 1949. The Argus's main competitor was David Syme's more liberal-minded The Age.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksHistory[edit] The newspaper was originally owned by William Kerr, a journalist who had worked with the Sydney Gazette
Sydney Gazette
before moving to Melbourne
Melbourne
in 1839 to work on John Pascoe Fawkner's Port Phillip Patriot. The first edition was published on 2 June 1846. The paper was soon known for its scurrilous abuse and sarcasm, and by 1853, Kerr had lost ownership through a series of libel suits
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Illustrated Australian News For Home Readers
The Illustrated Australian News is a former monthly news magazine of record in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Its precursor Illustrated Australian News for Home Readers was first published in 1837 by Ebenezer Syme and David Syme. The title was later changed to The Illustrated Australian News and Musical Times and finally shortened to The Illustrated Australian News from no. 233 (26 January 1876) through to the final edition, no. 408 (1 May 1889).[1] References[edit]^ Illustrated Australian News: Information at TroveThis news magazine or journal-related article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eSee tips for writing articles about magazines
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The Australasian
The Australasian Post, commonly called the Aussie Post, was Australia's longest-running weekly picture magazine.Contents1 History and profile1.1 Editors 1.2 Transition to Post2 ReferencesHistory and profile[edit] Its origins are traceable to Saturday 3 January 1857.[1] This is the date of the first issue of the publication Bell's Life
Bell's Life
in Victoria and Sporting Chronicle (probably best known for Tom Wills's famous 1858 Australian rules football
Australian rules football
letter). The weekly publication was based on the format of Bell's Life
Bell's Life
in London and produced by Charles Frederic Somerton in Melbourne. A Sydney version had been published since 1845.[2] In 1864, the weekly newspaper The Australasian was launched to an Australian and New Zealand
New Zealand
audience in a similar format to Bell's Life papers but with much less sport content
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of America Flag Coat of arms Motto: "In God
God
We Trust"[1][a] .mw-parser-outpu
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Schantz Organ Company
The Schantz Organ Company of Orrville, Ohio
Orrville, Ohio
is a major, national builder and restorer of pipe organs. Their facilities are located in Orrville, Wayne County Ohio, about 44 miles due south of Cleveland, Ohio. History[edit] The Schantz Organ Company was founded in 1873 by A.J. Tschantz (later changed to Schantz). Combining his inventive skills with a love of music, Schantz began building pipe organs after a brief venture into the construction of reed (parlor) organs. In the early part of the twentieth century, A.J.'s sons joined him in his organ building shop. Under their leadership, the growing company developed a strong reputation as a regional builder. (Most of the early instruments were modest in size and found within a couple of hundred miles of the workshop in Orrville.) In turn, their sons learned the skills of the trade and took over the operation of the company
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Concert Organ
In music, the organ (from Greek ὄργανον organon, "organ, instrument, tool")[1] is a keyboard instrument of one or more pipe divisions or other means for producing tones, each played with its own keyboard, played either with the hands on a keyboard or with the feet using pedals. The organ is a relatively old musical instrument,[2] dating from the time of Ctesibius
Ctesibius
of Alexandria (285–222 BC), who invented the water organ
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Copper
Copper
Copper
is a chemical element with symbol Cu (from Latin: cuprum) and atomic number 29. It is a soft, malleable, and ductile metal with very high thermal and electrical conductivity. A freshly exposed surface of pure copper has a reddish-orange color. Copper
Copper
is used as a conductor of heat and electricity, as a building material, and as a constituent of various metal alloys, such as sterling silver used in jewelry, cupronickel used to make marine hardware and coins, and constantan used in strain gauges and thermocouples for temperature measurement. Copper
Copper
is one of the few metals that occur in nature in directly usable metallic form (native metals) as opposed to needing extraction from an ore. This led to very early human use, from c. 8000 BC. It was the first metal to be smelted from its ore, c. 5000 BC, the first metal to be cast into a shape in a mold, c
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Melbourne Trades Hall
Victorian Trades Hall
Victorian Trades Hall
is the home of the Victorian Trades Hall Council. It is located on the corner of Lygon Street and Victoria Street, just north of the Melbourne
Melbourne
central business district, in the suburb of Carlton, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. It is the world's oldest trade union building. In 1856 the Melbourne
Melbourne
Trades Hall Committee was formed and received a grant of land to build the Melbourne
Melbourne
Trades Hall. The original Trades Hall was opened in May 1859, built by workers as an organising place for the labour movement in Melbourne. The workers financed the construction of the building themselves. It was built in the style of the parliament buildings which were just down the road, and over the years has been further developed.[1] The Hall underwent an upgrade from 1874 to 1925 at the hands of architectural firm Reed & Barnes
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Second Empire (architecture)
Second Empire is an architectural style, most popular in the latter half of the 19th century and early years of the 20th century. It was so named for the architectural elements in vogue during the era of the Second French Empire.[1] As the Second Empire style
Empire style
evolved from its 17th-century Renaissance foundations, it acquired a mix of earlier European styles, most notably the Baroque, often combined with mansard roofs and/or low, square based domes.[2] The style quickly spread and evolved as Baroque Revival architecture throughout Europe and across the Atlantic. Its suitability for super-scaling allowed it to be widely used in the design of municipal and corporate buildings. In the United States, where one of the leading architects working in the style was Alfred B
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Australia
Coordinates: 25°S 133°E / 25°S 133°E / -25; 133Commonwealth of Australia Flag Coat of arms Anthem: Advance Australia
Australia
Fair[N 1] Commonwealth of Australia, including the Australian territorial claim in the AntarcticCapitalCanberra35°18′29″S 149°07′28″E / 35.30806°S 149.12444°E / -35.30806; 149.12444Largest citySydneyNational languageEnglish[N 2]Religion (2016)[3] Various 52%
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Mansard
A mansard or mansard roof (also called a French roof or curb roof) is a four-sided gambrel-style hip roof characterized by two slopes on each of its sides with the lower slope, punctured by dormer windows, at a steeper angle than the upper.[1][2][3] The steep roof with windows creates an additional floor of habitable space[4] (a garret), and reduces the overall height of the roof for a given number of habitable stories. The upper slope of the roof may not be visible from street level when viewed from close proximity to the building. The earliest known example of a mansard roof is credited to Pierre Lescot on part of the Louvre
Louvre
built around 1550
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Pipe Organ
The pipe organ is a musical instrument that produces sound by driving pressurized air (called wind) through organ pipes selected via a keyboard. Because each pipe produces a single pitch, the pipes are provided in sets called ranks, each of which has a common timbre and volume throughout the keyboard compass. Most organs have multiple ranks of pipes of differing timbre, pitch, and volume that the player can employ singly or in combination through the use of controls called stops. A pipe organ has one or more keyboards (called manuals) played by the hands, and a pedalboard played by the feet; each keyboard has its own group of stops. The keyboard(s), pedalboard, and stops are housed in the organ's console. The organ's continuous supply of wind allows it to sustain notes for as long as the corresponding keys are pressed, unlike the piano and harpsichord whose sound begins to dissipate immediately after a key is depressed
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Theater (structure)
A theater, theatre or playhouse, is a structure where theatrical works or plays are performed, or other performances such as musical concerts may be produced. While a theater is not required for performance (as in environmental theater or street theater), a theater serves to define the performance and audience spaces. The facility is traditionally organized to provide support areas for performers, the technical crew and the audience members. There are as many types of theaters as there are types of performance. Theaters may be built specifically for a certain types of productions, they may serve for more general performance needs or they may be adapted or converted for use as a theater. They may range from open-air amphitheaters to ornate, cathedral-like structures to simple, undecorated rooms or black box theaters
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