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Mehit
Mehit
Mehit
or Mehyt was an Ancient Egyptian goddess. In the Early Dynastic period she was depicted as a reclining lioness with three bent poles projecting from her back. In that era she appears in numerous early dynastic sealings and ivory artifacts, usually together with a representation of an Upper Egyptian shrine.[1] Her main places of worship were Hierakonpolis
Hierakonpolis
and Thinis.[2] Mehit
Mehit
was the consort of Anhur, or Onuris, a hunter god who was worshipped in Thinis. Various texts allude to a myth in which Anhur tracks down Mehit
Mehit
in Nubia
Nubia
and brings her to Egypt as his wife. This event is the basis for Anhur's name, which means "bringer-back of the distant one"
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List Of Ancient Egyptian Sites
This is a list of ancient Egyptian sites, throughout all of Egypt
Egypt
and Nubia. Sites are listed by their classical name whenever possible, if not by their modern name, and lastly with their ancient name if no other is available.Contents1 Nomes1.1 Lower Egypt 1.2 Upper Egypt2 Lower Egypt
Egypt
(The Nile Delta) 3 Middle Egypt 4 Upper Egypt4.1 Northern Upper Egypt 4.2 Southern Upper Egypt5 Lower Nubia 6 Upper Nubia 7 Oases and Mediterranean
Mediterranean
coast 8 Sinai 9 Eastern Desert 10 Notes and references 11 BibliographyNomes[edit]The nomes of Ancient Egypt, in lower EgyptThe nomes of Ancient Egypt, in upper EgyptA nome is a subnational administrative division of Ancient Egypt. Lower Egypt[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it
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Great Royal Wife
Great Royal Wife, or alternatively, Chief King's Wife (Ancient Egyptian: ḥmt nswt wrt), is the term that was used to refer to the principal wife of the pharaoh of Ancient Egypt, who served many official functions. A simplified form of the term, Great Wife, is applied to more contemporary royal consorts in states throughout modern Africa
Africa
(e.g., Mantfombi Dlamini of Swaziland, chief consort of the Zulu King).Contents1 Description 2 Great wives today 3 Examples3.1 Ancient Egypt3.1.1 Middle Kingdom 3.1.2 Second Intermediate Period 3.1.3 New Kingdom 3.1.4 Third Intermediate Period 3.1.5 Late Period3.2 Elsewhere in Africa4 See also 5 ReferencesDescription[edit] While most Ancient Egyptians were monogamous, a male pharaoh would have had other, lesser wives and concubines in addition to the Great Royal Wife
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Egyptian Revival Architecture
Egyptian revival is an architectural style that uses the motifs and imagery of ancient Egypt. It is attributed generally to the public awareness of ancient Egyptian monuments generated by Napoleon's conquest of Egypt and Admiral Nelson's defeat of Napoleon
Napoleon
at the Battle of the Nile
Battle of the Nile
in 1798. Napoleon
Napoleon
took a scientific expedition with him to Egypt
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Art Of Ancient Egypt
Ancient Egyptian art is the painting, sculpture, architecture and other arts produced by the civilization of ancient Egypt in the lower Nile
Nile
Valley from about 3000 BC to 30 AD. Ancient Egyptian art reached a high level in painting and sculpture, and was both highly stylized and symbolic. It was famously conservative, and Egyptian styles changed remarkably little over more than three thousand years. Much of the surviving art comes from tombs and monuments and thus there is an emphasis on life after death and the preservation of knowledge of the past. Ancient Egyptian art included paintings, sculpture in wood (now rarely surviving), stone and ceramics, drawings on papyrus, faience, jewelry, ivories, and other art media
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Egyptian Astronomy
Egyptian astronomy
Egyptian astronomy
begins in prehistoric times, in the Predynastic Period. In the 5th millennium BCE, the stone circles at Nabta Playa may have made use of astronomical alignments. By the time the historical Dynastic Period began in the 3rd millennium BCE, the 365-day period of the Egyptian calendar
Egyptian calendar
was already in use, and the observation of stars was important in determining the annual flooding of the Nile. The Egyptian pyramids
Egyptian pyramids
were carefully aligned towards the pole star, and the temple of Amun-Re
Amun-Re
at Karnak
Karnak
was aligned on the rising of the midwinter sun
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Egyptian Chronology
The majority of Egyptologists agree on the outline and many details of the chronology of Ancient Egypt
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Urban Planning In Ancient Egypt
The use of urban planning in ancient Egypt is a matter of continuous debate. Because ancient sites usually survive only in fragments, and many ancient Egyptian cities have been continuously inhabited since their original forms, relatively little is actually understood about the general designs of Egyptian towns for any given period.[1] The Egyptians referred to most cities as either nwt or dmi.[2] Nwt usually refers to unplanned cities that grew naturally, such as Memphis and Thebes, while dmi can be translated as "settlement" and usually refers to towns that were laid out along a plan
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List Of Ancient Egyptian Towns And Cities
This is a list of known ancient Egyptian towns and cities.[1][2][3] The list is for sites intended for permanent settlement and does not include fortresses and other locations of intermittent habitation
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Clothing In Ancient Egypt
Ancient Egyptian clothes refers to clothing worn in ancient Egypt from the end of the Neolithic
Neolithic
period (prior to 3100 BC) to the collapse of the Ptolemaic dynasty
Ptolemaic dynasty
with the death of Cleopatra VII
Cleopatra VII
in 30 BC. Egyptian clothing was filled with a variety of colors. Adorned with precious gems and jewels, the fashions of the ancient Egyptians were made for not only beauty but also comfort. Egyptian fashion was created to keep cool while in the hot desert.[1]Contents1 Elements of Egyptian clothing 2 Deities 3 Pharaohs 4 Men 5 Women 6 Children 7 Wigs 8 Jewelry 9 Cosmetics 10 Footwear 11 See also 12 References 13 External linksElements of Egyptian clothingSample of ancient Egyptian linen from Saqqara, dating to 390-343 BC (Late Period)In ancient Egypt, linen was by far the most common textile
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Ancient Egyptian Cuisine
The cuisine of ancient Egypt covers a span of over three thousand years, but still retained many consistent traits until well into Greco-Roman
Greco-Roman
times. The staples of both poor and wealthy Egyptians were bread and beer, often accompanied by green-shooted onions, other vegetables, and to a lesser extent meat, game and fish.[1]Contents1 Meals 2 Bread 3 Beer 4 Fruit and vegetables 5 Meat
Meat
and fish 6 See also 7 Notes and references 8 External linksMeals[edit] Depictions of banquets can be found in paintings from both the Old Kingdom and New Kingdom. They usually started sometime in the afternoon. Men and women were separated unless they were married. Seating varied according to social status, with those of the highest status sitting on chairs, those slightly lower sat on stools and those lowest in rank sat on the raw floor
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List Of Ancient Egyptian Dynasties
In Ancient Egyptian history, dynasties are series of rulers sharing a common origin. They are usually, but not always, of the same family.[note 1] Ancient Egypt's historical period is traditionally divided into thirty-one pharaonic dynasties. The first thirty divisions are due to the 3rd century BC Egyptian priest Manetho, and appeared in his now-lost work Aegyptiaca, which was perhaps written for the Greek-speaking Ptolemaic Egyptian ruler of the time. The name of the short-lived thirty-first dynasty is a later coining. While widely used and useful, the system does have its shortcomings. Some dynasties only ruled part of Egypt and existed concurrently with other dynasties based in other cities. The Seventh might not have existed at all, the Tenth seems to be a continuation of the Ninth, and there might have been one or several Upper Egyptian Dynasties before the First Dynasty. This page lists articles on dynasties of Ancient Egypt
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History Of Ancient Egypt
The history of ancient Egypt
Egypt
spans the period from the early prehistoric settlements of the northern Nile
Nile
valley to the Roman conquest, in 30 BC
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Ptolemy II
Claudius
Claudius
Ptolemy
Ptolemy
(/ˈtɒləmi/; Greek: Κλαύδιος Πτολεμαῖος, Klaúdios Ptolemaîos [kláwdios ptolɛmɛ́ːos]; Latin: Claudius
Claudius
Ptolemaeus; c. AD 100 – c. 170)[2] was a Greco-Roman[3] mathematician, astronomer, geographer, astrologer, and poet of a single epigram in the Greek Anthology.[4][5] He lived in the city of Alexandria
Alexandria
in the Roman province of Egypt, wrote in Koine Greek, and held Roman citizenship.[6] The 14th-century astronomer Theodore Meliteniotes gave his birthplace as the prominent Greek city Ptolemais Hermiou
Ptolemais Hermiou
(Greek: Πτολεμαΐς ‘Ερμείου) in the Thebaid
Thebaid
(Greek: Θηβαΐδα [Θηβαΐς])
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Egyptian Language
The Egyptian language
Egyptian language
was spoken in ancient Egypt
Egypt
and was a branch of the Afro-Asiatic languages. Its attestation stretches over an extraordinarily long time, from the Old Egyptian
Old Egyptian
stage (mid-3rd millennium BC, Old Kingdom of Egypt). Its earliest known complete written sentence has been dated to about 2690 BC, which makes it one of the oldest recorded languages known, along with Sumerian.[2] Its classical form is known as Middle Egyptian, the vernacular of the Middle Kingdom of Egypt
Middle Kingdom of Egypt
which remained the literary language of Egypt until the Roman period. The spoken language evolved into Demotic by the time of Classical Antiquity, and finally into Coptic by the time of Christianisation
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Ancient Egyptian Literature
Ancient Egyptian literature
Ancient Egyptian literature
was written in the Egyptian language
Egyptian language
from ancient Egypt's pharaonic period until the end of Roman domination. It represents the oldest corpus of Egyptian literature. Along with Sumerian literature, it is considered the world's earliest literature.[1] Writing in ancient Egypt—both hieroglyphic and hieratic—first appeared in the late 4th millennium BC during the late phase of predynastic Egypt. By the Old Kingdom
Old Kingdom
(26th century BC to 22nd century BC), literary works included funerary texts, epistles and letters, hymns and poems, and commemorative autobiographical texts recounting the careers of prominent administrative officials. It was not until the early Middle Kingdom (21st century BC to 17th century BC) that a narrative Egyptian literature was created. This was a "media revolution" which, according to Richard B
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