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Meet Your Meat
Meet Your Meat
Meet Your Meat
is a 2002 documentary about factory farming created by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals
People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals
(PETA), narrated by Alec Baldwin,[1] and directed by Bruce Friedrich
Bruce Friedrich
and Cem Akin. The documentary explores the treatment of animals in modern animal agriculture (also known as industrial agriculture or factory farming). The film runs 12 minutes long. The film documents several cases of cruelty to animals, including:Egg-laying hens live in crowded cages, six or seven hens to one battery cage the size of a file drawer. Cattle are castrated, their horns are removed and third-degree burns (livestock branding) are inflicted on them, all without anesthetic. Cows used for their milk have calves removed from them shortly after birth
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Factory Farming
Intensive animal farming
Intensive animal farming
or industrial livestock production, also known as factory farming, is a production approach towards farm animals in order to maximize production output, while minimizing production costs.[1] Intensive farming
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Bioethics
Bioethics is the study of the ethical issues emerging from advances in biology and medicine. It is also moral discernment as it relates to medical policy and practice. Bioethicists are concerned with the ethical questions that arise in the relationships among life sciences, biotechnology, medicine, politics, law, and philosophy
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Animal Model
A model organism is a non-human species that is extensively studied to understand particular biological phenomena, with the expectation that discoveries made in the organism model will provide insight into the workings of other organisms.[1] Model organisms are in vivo models and are widely used to research human disease when human experimentation would be unfeasible or unethical.[2] This strategy is made possible by the common descent of all living organisms, and the conservation of metabolic and developmental pathways and genetic material over the course of evolution.[3][page needed] Studying model organisms can be informative, but care must be taken when extrapolating from one organism to another.[4][page needed] In researching human disease, model organisms allow for better understanding the disease process without the added risk of harming an actual human
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Animal Rights And The Holocaust
Several writers, including Jewish Nobel Prize laureate
Nobel Prize laureate
Isaac Bashevis Singer, and animal rights groups have drawn a comparison between the treatment of animals and the Holocaust.[1] The comparison is regarded as controversial, and has been criticized by organizations that campaign against antisemitism, including the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.[2] A character in one of Singer's stories described the treatment of animals by humans as "an eternal Treblinka".[3] Similarly, the eponymous character in J. M
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Animals In Sport
Animals in sport
Animals in sport
are a specific form of working animals. Many animals, at least in more commercial sports, are highly trained. Two of the most common animals in sport are horses and dogs.Contents1 Types of animal sporting events1.1 Racing 1.2 One-on-one and team events 1.3 Fighting 1.4 Hunting1.4.1 Fishing 1.4.2 Pigeon shooting1.5 Shows of training or breeding2 Popular culture 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksTypes of animal sporting events[edit] There are many types of animal sporting events, with varying levels of participation from humans. Some are solely between the animals while others use the animals in a lesser role. Most sports involve training, while some can also involve selective breeding. There are some large-scale events that include animals in a variety of sports. A rodeo can comprise many different sports, ranging from bull riding to pole bending
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Internet Movie Database
IMDb, also known as Internet Movie Database, is an online database of information related to world films, television programs, home videos and video games, and internet streams, including cast, production crew, personnel and fictional character biographies, plot summaries, trivia, and fan reviews and ratings. An additional fan feature, message boards, was abandoned in February, 2017. The database is owned and operated by IMDb.com, Inc., a subsidiary of Amazon. As of December 2017[update], IMDb
IMDb
has approximately 4.7 million titles (including episodes) and 8.3 million personalities in its database,[2] as well as 83 million registered users. The movie and talent pages of IMDb
IMDb
are accessible to all internet users, but a registration process is necessary to contribute information to the site. Most data in the database is provided by volunteer contributors
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Meat Industry
The term meat industry describes modern industrialized livestock agriculture for production, packing, preservation and marketing of meat (in contrast to dairy products, wool, etc.). In economics, it is a fusion of primary (agriculture) and secondary (industry) activity and hard to characterize strictly in terms of either one alone. The greater part of the entire meat industry is termed meat packing industry- the segment that handles the slaughtering, processing, packaging, and distribution of animals such as cattle, pigs, sheep and other livestock. A great portion of the ever-growing[1] meat branch in the food industry involves intensive animal farming in which livestock are kept almost entirely indoors[2] or in restricted outdoor settings like pens. Many aspects of the raising of animals for meat have become industrialized, even many practices more associated with smaller family farms, e.g
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Fast Food Industry
Fast food
Fast food
is a mass-produced food that is prepared and served very quickly. The food is typically less nutritionally valuable compared to other foods and dishes. While any meal with low preparation time can be considered fast food, typically the term refers to food sold in a restaurant or store with frozen, preheated or precooked ingredients, and served to the customer in a packaged form for take-out/take-away. Fast food restaurants
Fast food restaurants
are traditionally distinguished by their ability to serve food via a drive-through. Outlets may be stands or kiosks, which may provide no shelter or seating,[1] or fast food restaurants (also known as quick service restaurants). Franchise operations that are part of restaurant chains have standardized foodstuffs shipped to each restaurant from central locations.[2] Fast food
Fast food
began with the first fish and chip shops in Britain in the 1860s
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Corporate Ethics
Business ethics (also known as corporate ethics) is a form of applied ethics or professional ethics that examines ethical principles and moral or ethical problems that arise in a business environment. It applies to all aspects of business conduct and is relevant to the conduct of individuals and entire organizations.[1] These ethics originate from individuals, organizational statements or from the legal system. These norms, values, ethical, and unethical practices are what is used to guide business. They help those businesses maintain a better connection with their stakeholders.[2] Business ethics refers to contemporary organizational standards, principles, sets of values and norms that govern the actions and behavior of an individual in the business organization. Business ethics have two dimensions, normative business ethics or descriptive business ethics. As a corporate practice and a career specialization, the field is primarily normative
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Debeaking
Debeaking, is the partial removal of the beak of poultry, especially layer hens and turkeys although it may also be performed on quail and ducks. Most commonly, the beak is shortened permanently, although regrowth can occur. The trimmed lower beak is somewhat longer than the upper beak. Beak
Beak
trimming is most common in egg-laying strains of chickens. In some countries such as the United States, turkeys routinely have their beaks trimmed, however, in the UK, only 10% of turkeys are beak trimmed.[1] Beak
Beak
trimming is a preventive measure to reduce damage caused by injurious pecking such as cannibalism, feather pecking and vent pecking, and thereby improve livability.[2] Commercial broiler chickens are not routinely beak trimmed as they reach slaughter weight at approximately 6 weeks of age, i.e. before injurious pecking usually begins
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Animal Consciousness
Animal consciousness, or animal awareness, is the quality or state of self-awareness within an animal, or of being aware of an external object or something within itself.[2][3] In humans, consciousness has been defined as: sentience, awareness, subjectivity, qualia, the ability to experience or to feel, wakefulness, having a sense of selfhood, and the executive control system of the mind.[4] Despite the difficulty in definition, many philosophers believe there is a broadly shared underlying intuition about what consciousness is.[5] The topic of animal consciousness is beset with a number of difficulties
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Feedlot
A feedlot or feed yard is a type of animal feeding operation (AFO) which is used in intensive animal farming for finishing livestock, notably beef cattle, but also swine, horses, sheep, turkeys, chickens or ducks, prior to slaughter. Large beef feedlots are called concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO) in the United States[1] and intensive livestock operations (ILOs)[2] or confined feeding operations (CFO)[3] in Canada
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The Meatrix
The Meatrix is a short flash animation critical of factory farming and industrial agricultural practices. It has been translated into more than 30 languages and watched by more than 30 million people.[1] It was made by the green messaging firm Free Range Studios in 2003 as a commissioned project for GRACE Communications Foundation, and two sequels were released in 2006,[2] titled The Meatrix II: Revolting, and The Meatrix II ½.Contents1 Plot 2 Awards 3 References 4 External linksPlot[edit] In a dark satire of The Matrix, Leo, a pig on a seemingly bucolic family farm, is approached by Moopheus, an anthropomorphic bull. Moopheus shows Leo that the farm he has known is an illusion, and that he is really trapped in a horrific factory farm
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Veal
Veal
Veal
is the meat of calves, in contrast to the beef from older cattle. Veal
Veal
can be produced from a calf of either sex and any breed; however, most veal comes from young males of dairy breeds[1] who are not used for breeding.[2] Generally, veal is more expensive than beef from older cattle. Some methods or aspects of veal production are controversial due to animal welfare concerns.Contents1 Types 2 Culinary uses 3 Production3.1 At birth 3.2 Housing 3.3 Feeding 3.4 Health4 Controversy4.1 Animal welfare4.1.1 Restricted space 4.1.2 Abnormal gut development 4.1.3 Abnormal behaviours 4.1.4 Increased disease susceptibility 4.1.5 Veal
Veal
crates4.1.5.1 Cruelty to calves4.2 Drug use5 Crate bans5.1 Europe 5.2 United States6 See also 7 Further reading 8 References 9 External linksTypes[edit]Free-raised calvesThere are several types of veal, although some terminology varies by country
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Industrial Agriculture
Intensive farming
Intensive farming
involves various types of agriculture with higher levels of input and output per cubic unit of agricultural land area. It is characterized by a low fallow ratio, higher use of inputs such as capital and labour, and higher crop yields per cubic unit land area.[1][2] This contrasts with traditional agriculture, in which the inputs per unit land are lower. The term "intensive" involves various meanings, some of which refer to organic farming methods (such as biointensive agriculture and French intensive gardening), and others that refer to nonorganic and industrial methods. Intensive animal farming involves either large numbers of animals raised on limited land, usually concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), often referred to as factory farms,[1][3][4] or managed intensive rotational grazing (MIRG), which has both organic and non-organic types
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