HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Medicaid
Medicaid
Medicaid
in the United States is a joint federal and state program that helps with medical costs for some people with limited income and resources. Medicaid
Medicaid
also offers benefits not normally covered by Medicare, like nursing home care and personal care services
[...More...]

"Medicaid" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Connecticut
Coordinates: 41°36′N 72°42′W / 41.6°N 72.7°W / 41.6; -72.7State of ConnecticutFlag SealNickname(s):The Constitution State (official) The Nutmeg
Nutmeg
State The Provisions State The Land of Steady HabitsMotto(s): Qui transtulit sustinet
Qui transtulit sustinet

[...More...]

"Connecticut" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Citizenship In The United States
Citizenship
Citizenship
of the United States[2][3] is a status that entails specific rights, duties and benefits. Citizenship
Citizenship
is understood as a "right to have rights" since it serves as a foundation of fundamental rights derived from and protected by the Constitution and laws of the United States, such as the right to freedom of expression, vote, due process, live and work in the United States, and to receive federal assistance.[4][5] However, not all U.S. citizens, such as those living in Puerto Rico, have the right to vote in national elections. There are two primary sources of citizenship: birthright citizenship, in which a person is presumed to be a citizen if he or she was born within the territorial limits of the United States, or—providing certain other requirements are met—born abroad to a U.S. citizen parent,[6][7] and naturalization, a process in which an immigrant applies for citizenship and is accepted
[...More...]

"Citizenship In The United States" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Disability
Disability
Disability
is an impairment that may be cognitive, developmental, intellectual, mental, physical, sensory, or some combination of these. It substantially affects a person's life activities and may be present from birth or occur during a person's lifetime. [1]Disabilities is an umbrella term, covering impairments, activity limitations, and participation restrictions. An impairment is a problem in body function or structure; an activity limitation is a difficulty encountered by an individual in executing a task or action; while a participation restriction is a problem experienced by an individual in involvement in life situations. Disability
Disability
is thus not just a health problem
[...More...]

"Disability" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Supreme Court Of The United States
The Supreme Court of the United States
United States
(sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[2]) is the highest federal court of the United States. Established pursuant to Article Three of the United States Constitution in 1789, it has ultimate (and largely discretionary) appellate jurisdiction over all federal courts and state court cases involving issues of federal law plus original jurisdiction over a small range of cases. In the legal system of the United States, the Supreme Court is generally the final interpreter of federal law including the United States
United States
Constitution, but it may act only within the context of a case in which it has jurisdiction
[...More...]

"Supreme Court Of The United States" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Medical Underwriting
Medical underwriting is a health insurance term referring to the use of medical or health information in the evaluation of an applicant for coverage, typically for life or health insurance. As part of the underwriting process, an individual's health information may be used in making two decisions: whether to offer or deny coverage and what premium rate to set for the policy. The two most common methods of medical underwriting are known as moratorium underwriting, a relatively simple process, and full medical underwriting, a more indepth analysis of a client's health information.[1] The use of medical underwriting may be restricted by law in certain insurance markets
[...More...]

"Medical Underwriting" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

TRICARE
Tricare
Tricare
(styled TRICARE), formerly known as the Civilian
Civilian
Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS), is a health care program of the United States Department of Defense
United States Department of Defense
Military Health System.[1] Tricare
Tricare
provides civilian health benefits for U.S Armed Forces military personnel, military retirees, and their dependents, including some members of the Reserve Component
[...More...]

"TRICARE" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Maine
Maine
Maine
(/meɪn/) is a U.S. state
U.S. state
in the New England
New England
region of the northeastern United States. Maine
Maine
is the 39th most extensive and the 9th least populous of the U.S. states. It is bordered by New Hampshire to the west, the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the southeast, and the Canadian provinces of New Brunswick
New Brunswick
and Quebec
Quebec
to the northeast and northwest respectively. Maine
Maine
is the easternmost state in the contiguous United States, and the northernmost east of the Great Lakes. It is known for its jagged, rocky coastline; low, rolling mountains; heavily forested interior; and picturesque waterways, as well as its seafood cuisine, especially clams and lobster
[...More...]

"Maine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Federal Employees Health Benefits Program
The Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program is a system of "managed competition" through which employee health benefits are provided to civilian government employees and annuitants of the United States government. The government contributes 72% of the weighted average premium of all plans, not to exceed 75% of the premium for any one plan (calculated separately for individual and family coverage).[1] The FEHB program allows some insurance companies, employee associations, and labor unions to market health insurance plans to governmental employees. The program is administered by the United States Office of Personnel Management (OPM).Contents1 History 2 Plans 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The program was created in 1960. Employer sponsorship of health insurance in the United States became prevalent during World War II, as one of the few ways by which employers could escape wage and price control limitations on employee wages
[...More...]

"Federal Employees Health Benefits Program" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Veterans Health Administration
The Veterans Health Administration
Veterans Health Administration
(VHA) is the component of the United States
United States
Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) led by the Under Secretary of Veterans Affairs
Secretary of Veterans Affairs
for Health[2] that implements the medical assistance program of the VA through the administration and operation of numerous VA Medical Centers (VAMC), Outpatient Clinics (OPC), Community Based Outpatient Clinics (CBOC), and VA Community Living Centers (VA Nursing Home) Programs. Many evaluations have found that by most measures VHA care is equal to, and sometimes better than, care provided in the private sector, when judged by standard evidence-based guidelines.[3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11][12] The VHA is distinct from the U.S
[...More...]

"Veterans Health Administration" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Fee For Service
Fee-for-service (FFS) is a payment model where services are unbundled and paid for separately. In health care, it gives an incentive for physicians to provide more treatments because payment is dependent on the quantity of care, rather than quality of care. However evidence of the effectiveness of pay-for-performance in improving health care quality is mixed, without conclusive proof that these programs either succeed or fail.[1] Similarly, when patients are shielded from paying (cost-sharing) by health insurance coverage, they are incentivized to welcome any medical service that might do some good. FFS is the dominant physician payment method in the United States,[2] and it raises costs, discourages the efficiencies of integrated care, and a variety of reform efforts have been attempted, recommended, or initiated to reduce its influence (such as moving towards bundled payments and capitation)
[...More...]

"Fee For Service" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Military Health System
The Military Health System
Military Health System
is the enterprise within the United States Department of Defense that provides health care to active duty and retired U.S. Military
U.S. Military
personnel and their dependents.[1] Its mission is to provide health support for the full range of military operations and sustain the health of all who are entrusted to MHS care.[2] Its primary mission is to maintain the health of military personnel, so they can carry out their military missions; and to deliver health care during wartime
[...More...]

"Military Health System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Health Savings Account
A health savings account (HSA) is a tax-advantaged medical savings account available to taxpayers in the United States
United States
who are enrolled in a high-deductible health plan (HDHP).[1][2] The funds contributed to an account are not subject to federal income tax at the time of deposit. Unlike a flexible spending account (FSA), HSA funds roll over and accumulate year to year if they are not spent. HSAs are owned by the individual, which differentiates them from company-owned Health Reimbursement Arrangements (HRA) that are an alternate tax-deductible source of funds paired with either HDHPs or standard health plans. HSA funds may currently be used to pay for qualified medical expenses at any time without federal tax liability or penalty
[...More...]

"Health Savings Account" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Flexible Spending Account
A flexible spending account (FSA), also known as a flexible spending arrangement, is one of a number of tax-advantaged financial accounts that can be set up through a cafeteria plan of an employer in the United States. A FSA allows an employee to set aside a portion of earnings to pay for qualified expenses as established in the cafeteria plan, most commonly for medical expenses but often for dependent care or other expenses. Money deducted from an employee's pay into an FSA is not subject to payroll taxes, resulting in payroll tax savings.[1] Before the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, one significant disadvantage to using an FSA was that funds not used by the end of the plan year were forfeited to the employer, known as the "use it or lose it" rule
[...More...]

"Flexible Spending Account" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Consumer-driven Health Care
Consumer-driven healthcare (CDHC), defined narrowly, refers to third-tier health insurance plans that allow members to use health savings accounts (HSAs), Health Reimbursement Accounts (HRAs), or similar medical payment products to pay routine healthcare expenses directly, but a high-deductible health plan protects them from catastrophic medical expenses. High-deductible policies cost less, but the user pays medical claims using a prefunded spending account, often with a special debit card provided by a bank or insurance plan. If the balance on this account runs out, the user pays claims just like under a regular deductible. Users keep any unused balance or "rollover" at the end of the year to increase future balances or to invest for future expenses
[...More...]

"Consumer-driven Health Care" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Vermont Health Care Reform
In 2011, the Vermont
Vermont
state government enacted a law functionally establishing the first state-level single-payer health care system in the United States. Green Mountain Care, established by the passage of H.202, creates a system in the state where Vermonters receive universal health care coverage as well as technological improvements to the existing system. On December 17, 2014, Vermont
Vermont
abandoned its plan for universal health care, citing the taxes required of smaller businesses within the state.[1]Contents1 Planning 2 Legislation2.1 Green Mountain Care3 Popular opinion and reactions 4 Aftermath 5 References 6 External linksPlanning[edit] In 2010, the State Legislature passed S 88 (which included provisions from Act 128), which enabled the state of Vermont
Vermont
to establish a commission to study different forms of health care delivery in the state.[2] Dr
[...More...]

"Vermont Health Care Reform" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.