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Medea
In Greek mythology, Medea
Medea
(/mɪˈdiːə/; Greek: Μήδεια, Mēdeia, Georgian: მედეა) was the daughter of King Aeëtes of Colchis,[1] niece of Circe, granddaughter of the sun god Helios. Medea
Medea
figures in the myth of
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Cadmus
In Greek mythology, Cadmus
Cadmus
(/ˈkædməs/; Greek: Κάδμος Kadmos), was the founder and first king of Thebes.[1] Cadmus
Cadmus
was the first
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Royal Academy
The Royal Academy of Arts
Royal Academy of Arts
(RA) is an art institution based in Burlington House
Burlington House
on Piccadilly
Piccadilly
in London
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European Dragon
European dragons are legendary creatures in folklore and mythology among the overlapping cultures of Europe.[1] In the modern period, the European dragon
European dragon
is typically depicted as a large, fire-breathing, scaly, horned, lizard-like creature; the creature also has leathery, bat-like wings, four legs, and a long, muscular prehensile tail. Some depictions show dragons with feathered wings, crests, ear frills, fiery manes, ivory spikes running down its spine, and various exotic decorations. Others have no legs or multiple heads. In folktales, dragon's blood often contains unique powers, keeping them alive for longer or giving them poisonous or acidic properties. For example, in the opera Siegfried, dragon's blood allows Siegfried to understand the language of the Forest Bird. The typical dragon protects a cavern or castle filled with gold and treasure
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Narcotic
The term narcotic (/nɑːrˈkɒtɪk/, from ancient Greek ναρκῶ narkō, "to make numb") originally referred medically to any psychoactive compound with sleep-inducing properties. In the United States, it has since become associated with opiates and opioids, commonly morphine and heroin, as well as derivatives of many of the compounds found within raw opium latex. The primary three are morphine, codeine, and thebaine (while thebaine itself is only very mildly psychoactive, it is a crucial precursor in the vast majority of semi-synthetic opioids, such as oxycodone)
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Hesiod
Hesiod
Hesiod
(/ˈhiːsiəd/ or /ˈhɛsiəd/;[1] Greek: Ἡσίοδος Hēsíodos) was a Greek poet generally thought by scholars to have been active between 750 and 650 BC, around the same time as Homer.[2][3] He is generally regarded as the first written poet in the Western tradition to regard himself as an individual persona with an active role to play in his subject.[4] Ancient authors credited Hesiod and Homer
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Aphrodite
Aphrodite
Aphrodite
(/æfrəˈdaɪti/ ( listen) af-rə-DY-tee; Greek: Ἀφροδίτη Aphrodítē) is the ancient Greek goddess of love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. She is identified with the planet Venus, which is named after the Roman goddess Venus, with whom Aphrodite
Aphrodite
was extensively syncretized. Aphrodite's major symbols include myrtles, roses, doves, sparrows, and swans. The cult of Aphrodite
Aphrodite
was largely derived from that of the Phoenician goddess Astarte, a cognate of the East Semitic goddess Ishtar, whose cult was based on the Sumerian cult of Inanna. Aphrodite's main cult centers were Cythera, Cyprus, Corinth, and Athens. Her main festival was the Aphrodisia, which was celebrated annually in midsummer. In Laconia, Aphrodite
Aphrodite
was worshipped as a warrior goddess
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Thessaly
Thessaly
Thessaly
(Greek: Θεσσαλία, Thessalía; ancient Thessalian: Πετθαλία, Petthalía) is a traditional geographic and modern administrative region of Greece, comprising most of the ancient region of the same name. Before the Greek Dark Ages, Thessaly
Thessaly
was known as Aeolia (Greek: Αἰολία, Aíolía), and appears thus in Homer's Odyssey. Thessaly
Thessaly
became part of the modern Greek state in 1881, after four and a half centuries of Ottoman rule. Since 1987 it has formed one of the country's 13 regions[2] and is further (since the Kallikratis reform of 2010) sub-divided into 5 regional units and 25 municipalities. The capital of the region is Larissa
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Ancient Libya
The Latin
Latin
name Libya
Libya
(from Greek Λιβύη, Libyē) referred to the region west of the Nile
Nile
generally corresponding to the modern Maghreb. Its people were ancestors of the modern Berbers.[1] Berbers
Berbers
occupied the area for thousands of years before the beginning of human records in ancient Egypt. Climate changes affected the locations of the settlements. More narrowly, Libya
Libya
could also refer to the country immediately west of Egypt, viz. Marmarica
Marmarica
( Libya
Libya
Inferior) and Cyrenaica
Cyrenaica
(Libya Superior)
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Battus (mythology)
Battus was a figure in Greek mythology
Greek mythology
who witnessed Hermes
Hermes
stealing Apollo's cattle in Maenalus
Maenalus
in Arcadia. He was punished by being turned into stone.[1] References[edit]^ Michael Grant, John Hazel (2004). Who's Who in Classical Mythology (revised ed.). Routledge. p. 97. ISBN 9781134509430. This article relating to Greek mythology
Greek mythology
is a stub
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Crete
Crete
Crete
(Greek: Κρήτη, Kríti ['kriti]; Ancient Greek: Κρήτη, Krḗtē) is the largest and most populous of the Greek islands, the 88th largest island in the world and the fifth largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, after Sicily, Sardinia, Cyprus, and Corsica. Crete and a number of surrounding islands and islets constitute the region of Crete
Crete
(Greek: Περιφέρεια Κρήτης), one of the 13 top-level administrative units of Greece. The capital and the largest city is Heraklion. As of 2011[update], the region had a population of 623,065. Crete
Crete
forms a significant part of the economy and cultural heritage of Greece, while retaining its own local cultural traits (such as its own poetry and music). It was once the centre of the Minoan civilisation (c. 2700–1420 BC), which is the earliest known civilisation in Europe
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Georgian Language
Georgian (ქართული ენა, kartuli ena, pronounced [kʰɑrtʰuli ɛnɑ]) is a Kartvelian language
Kartvelian language
spoken by Georgians
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Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
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Unguent
An unguent is a soothing preparation spread on wounds, burns, rashes, abrasions or other topical injuries (i.e. damage to the skin). It is similar to an ointment, though typically an unguent is less viscous and more oily
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Eros (mythology)
In Greek mythology, Eros (UK: /ˈɪərɒs, ˈɛrɒs/, US: /ˈɛrɒs, ˈɛroʊs/;[2] Greek: Ἔρως, "Desire") was the Greek god of sexual attraction. His Roman counterpart was Cupid[3] ("desire"). Some myths make him a primordial god, while in other myths, he is the son of Aphrodite. He was one of the winged love gods, Erotes.Contents1 Etymology 2 Cult and depiction 3 Primordial god 4 Son of Aphrodite and Ares 5 Eros and Psyche 6 Eros in art 7 See also 8 References and sources 9 External linksEtymology[edit] The Greek ἔρως, meaning "desire," comes from ἔραμαι "to desire, love", of uncertain etymology. R. S. P. Beekes has suggested a Pre-Greek origin.[4] Cult and depiction[edit] Eros appears in ancient Greek sources under several different guises. In the earliest sources (the cosmogonies, the earliest philosophers, and texts referring to the mystery religions), he is one of the primordial gods involved in the coming into being of the cosmos
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Euphemus
Euphemus /juːˈfiːməs/ (Ancient Greek: Εὔφημος, pronounced [eʊ̯́pʰɛːmos] "reputable") in Greek mythology was the name of several distinct characters.Contents1 The Argonaut 2 The Iliad 3 Other mythical figures 4 Notes and references 5 BibliographyThe Argonaut[edit] Euphemus was a son of Poseidon, granted by his father the power to walk on water.[1][2] He was counted among the Calydonian hunters[3] and the Argonauts, and was connected with the legend of the foundation of Cyrene.[4][5] Euphemus's mother is variously named: Europe, daughter of the giant Tityos;[2][6] Doris or Mecionice, daughter of either
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