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McHale's Navy
Sto-Rev-Co Productions Revue Studios (1962–63) Universal TV
Universal TV
(1963–66)Distributor Universal Television NBC Universal Television
Universal Television
DistributionReleaseOriginal network ABCPicture format Black-and-whiteAudio format MonauralOriginal release October 11, 1962 (1962-10-11) – April 12, 1966 (1966-04-12) McHale's Navy
McHale's Navy
is an American sitcom starring Ernest Borgnine
Ernest Borgnine
that aired 138 half-hour episodes over four seasons, from October 11, 1962, to April 12, 1966, on the ABC television network
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Henry Fonda
Henry Jaynes Fonda (May 16, 1905 – August 12, 1982) was an American film and stage actor[2] with a career spanning five decades. Fonda made his mark early as a Broadway actor. He also appeared in 1938 in plays performed in White Plains, New York, with Joan Tompkins. He made his Hollywood
Hollywood
debut in 1935, and his career gained momentum after his Academy Award-nominated performance as Tom Joad
Tom Joad
in The Grapes of Wrath, a 1940 adaptation of John Steinbeck's novel about an Oklahoma
Oklahoma
family who moved west during the Dust Bowl. Throughout five decades in Hollywood, Fonda cultivated a strong, appealing screen image in such classics as The Ox-Bow Incident, Mister Roberts, and 12 Angry Men
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Sequel
A sequel is a literature, film, theatre, television, music or video game that continues the story of, or expands upon, some earlier work. In the common context of a narrative work of fiction, a sequel portrays events set in the same fictional universe as an earlier work, usually chronologically following the events of that work.[1] In many cases, the sequel continues elements of the original story, often with the same characters and settings. A sequel can lead to a series, in which key elements appear repeatedly
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Pacific War
Allied victoryEnd of World War II Fall of the Japanese Empire Continuation of the Chinese Civil War 1951 Treaty of San Francisco Substantial weakening of European colonial powers and the gradual decolonization of AsiaTerritorial changesAllied occupation of JapanRemoval of all Japanese troops occupying parts of the Republic of China and the retrocession of Taiwan to China Liberation of Korea and Manchuria
Manchuria
from Japanese rule, followed by the division of Korea Cession of all Japanese-held islands in the Central
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Academy Award
MoonlightBest Picture The Shape of WaterThe Academy Awards, also known as the Oscars,[1] are a set of 24 awards for artistic and technical merit in the American film industry, given annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), to recognize excellence in cinematic achievements as assessed by the Academy's voting membership. The various category winners are awarded a copy of a golden statuette, officially called the "Academy Award of Merit", which has become commonly known by its nickname "Oscar". The sculpture was created by George Stanley.[2] The awards, first presented in 1929 at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, are overseen by AMPAS.[3][4] The awards ceremony was first broadcast on radio in 1930 and televised for the first time in 1953. It is now seen live in more than 200 countries and can be streamed live online.[5] The Academy Awards ceremony is the oldest worldwide entertainment awards ceremony
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Alcoa Premiere
Alcoa
Alcoa
Premiere (also known as Premiere, Presented by Fred Astaire) is an American anthology drama series that aired from October 1961 to July 1963 on ABC. The series was hosted by Fred Astaire
Fred Astaire
and directed by Norman Lloyd among many others. Astaire also starred in several of the episodes.Contents1 Overview 2 Broadcast history 3 Awards 4 Episodes4.1 Season 1 (1961–62) 4.2 Season 2 (1962–63)5 See also 6 References 7 External linksOverview[edit] Each episode presented a new drama which often offered powerful stories on painful or controversial subjects as opposed to classic drama. The program featured actors such as James Stewart, John Wayne, Charlton Heston, James Whitmore, Maureen O'Sullivan, Arthur Kennedy and Ray Milland
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Fred Astaire
Fred Astaire
Fred Astaire
(born Frederick Austerlitz;[1] May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987) was an American dancer, singer, actor, choreographer and television presenter. He is widely regarded as one of the most influential dancers in the history of film and television musicals.[2] His stage and subsequent film and television careers spanned a total of 76 years, during which he starred in more than 10 Broadway and London
London
musicals, made 31 musical films, 4 television specials, and issued numerous recordings. As a dancer, he is best remembered for his sense of rhythm, his perfectionism, and as the dancing partner and on-screen romantic interest of Ginger Rogers, with whom he co-starred in a series of ten Hollywood
Hollywood
musicals
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Lieutenant Commander
Lieutenant
Lieutenant
commander (also hyphenated lieutenant-commander and abbreviated LCdr,[1] LCdr.[2] or LCDR[3][4]) is a commissioned officer rank in many navies. The rank is superior to a lieutenant and subordinate to a commander
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United States Naval Aviator
A Naval Aviator
Naval Aviator
is a commissioned officer or warrant officer qualified as a pilot in the United States Navy, United States Marine Corps
United States Marine Corps
or United States Coast Guard.Contents1 Naming conventions1.1 Naval aviation pilot (NAP) 1.2 Naval aviation cadet (NAVCAD)2 Prerequisites2.1 Introductory flight screening (IFS) 2.2 Aviation preflight indoctrination (API) 2.3 Primary flight training 2.4 Advanced flight training2.4.1 Strike syllabus 2.4.2 E-2/C-2 pipeline 2.4.3 Rotary-wing pipeline 2.4.4 Land-based syllabus3 Insignia and winging 4 Community selection 5 Fleet assignments 6 Shore rotation 7 Service commitment 8 Reserve Naval Aviators 9 Squadron commanding officer 10 Aircraft carrier
Aircraft carrier
commanding officer 11 Naval astronauts 12 See also 13 ReferencesNaming conventions[edit] In the U.S
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United States Naval Academy
The United States Naval Academy
United States Naval Academy
(also known as USNA, Annapolis, or simply Navy) is a four-year coeducational federal service academy in Annapolis, Maryland. Established on 10 October 1845, under Secretary of the Navy George Bancroft, it is the second oldest of the United States' five service academies, and educates officers for commissioning primarily into the United States Navy
United States Navy
and United States Marine Corps. The 338-acre (137 ha) campus is located on the former grounds of Fort Severn
Fort Severn
at the confluence of the Severn River and Chesapeake Bay
Chesapeake Bay
in Anne Arundel County, 33 miles (53 km) east of Washington, D.C. and 26 miles (42 km) southeast of Baltimore. The entire campus (known to insiders as "the Yard") is a National Historic Landmark and home to many historic sites, buildings, and monuments
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Feature Films
A feature film is a film (also called a motion picture, movie, or just film) with a running time long enough to be considered the principal or sole film to fill a program. The notion of how long this should be has varied according to time and place. According to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the American Film
Film
Institute, and the British Film
Film
Institute, a feature film runs for at least 40 minutes, while the Screen Actors Guild
Screen Actors Guild
holds that it is 80 minutes or longer. Most feature films are between 70 and 210 minutes long. The first dramatic feature film was the 60-minute The Story of the Kelly Gang (1906, Australia)[1]. The first (proto)-feature-length adaptation was Les Misérables (1909, U.S.)
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Still
A still is an apparatus used to distill liquid mixtures by heating to selectively boil and then cooling to condense the vapor.[1] A still uses the same concepts as a basic distillation apparatus, but on a much larger scale. Stills have been used to produce perfume and medicine, water for injection (WFI) for pharmaceutical use, generally to separate and purify different chemicals, and to produce distilled beverages containing ethanol.Contents1 Application 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksApplication[edit] Main article: Distilled beverage Since ethyl alcohol boils at a much lower temperature than water, simple distillation can easily separate highly concentrated alcohol from a mixture (although ethanol and water become azeotropic once ethanol reaches concentration above 95%)
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Moonshine
Moonshine
Moonshine
was originally a slang term for high-proof distilled spirits usually produced illicitly, without government authorization.[1] In recent years, however, moonshine has been legalized in various countries and has become a commercial product. Legal in the United States
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Cruiser
A cruiser is a type of warship. The term has been in use for several hundred years, and has had different meanings throughout this period. During the Age of Sail, the term cruising referred to certain kinds of missions – independent scouting, commerce protection, or raiding – fulfilled by a frigate or sloop, which were the cruising warships of a fleet. Modern cruisers are generally the largest ships in a fleet after aircraft carriers, and can usually perform several roles. In the middle of the 19th century, cruiser came to be a classification for the ships intended for cruising distant waters, commerce raiding, and scouting for the battle fleet
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The Paley Center For Media
The Paley Center for Media, formerly the Museum of Television
Television
& Radio
Radio
(MT&R) and the Museum of Broadcasting, founded in 1975 by William S
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