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Mazda Bongo
The Mazda
Mazda
Bongo, also known as Mazda
Mazda
E-Series, Mazda
Mazda
Access, and the Ford Econovan, was a cabover van and pickup truck manufactured by the Japanese automobile manufacturer Mazda
Mazda
from 1966 until 2018. After the Bongo is discontinued, there is no more successor to the Bongo as Mazda
Mazda
will focus on building economy cars. It has been built with rear-, middle-, as well as front-mounted engines. It also formed the basis for the long running Kia Bongo
Kia Bongo
range
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Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association
Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association, or JAMA, is a trade association with its headquarters in Tokyo, Japan. It was founded in April 1967 and serves as a platform for the automakers of Japan to share technological developments and management practices. There are currently 14 member companies, manufacturing not only cars, but trucks and motorcycles as well. The organization also deals with the manufacturing and distribution of vehicle parts around the world. Together, the companies of JAMA hold a vast share of the markets in the United States, Europe, and many developing countries. JAMA also has offices located in Beijing, Singapore, Washington, D.C
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Common Rail
Common rail
Common rail
direct fuel injection is a direct fuel injection system for diesel engines. On diesel engines, it features a high-pressure (over 100 bar or 10 MPa or 1,500 psi) fuel rail feeding individual solenoid valves, as opposed to a low-pressure fuel pump feeding unit injectors (or pump nozzles)
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Kia Motors
Kia Motor Corporation (Hangul: 기아자동차; Hanja: 起亞自動車, IPA: [ki.a], literally "Kia automobile"; stylized as KIΛ), headquartered in Seoul, is South Korea's second-largest automobile manufacturer, following the Hyundai Motor Company, with sales of over 3.3 million vehicles in 2015. As of December 2015[update], the Kia Motor Corporation is minority owned by Hyundai, which owns a 33.88% stake valued at just over $6 billion USD
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Nissan
Coordinates: 35°27′39″N 139°37′45″E / 35.460883°N 139.6291854°E / 35.460883; 139.6291854This article is missing information about the Nissan
Nissan
Canada customer information data breach[1]. Please expand the article to include this information. Further details may exist on the talk page. (December 2017) Nissan
Nissan
Motor Co., Ltd. Nissan
Nissan
global headquarters in Yokohama, JapanNative name日産自動車株式会社Romanized name Nissan
Nissan
Jidōsha Kabushiki-gaishaTypePublic (K.K.)Traded asTYO: 7201 TOPIX Core 30 ComponentIndustry AutomotiveFounded 26 December 1933; 84 years ago (1933-12-26) (under Nissan Group)[2][3]FounderMasujiro Hashimoto[4] Kenjiro Den Rokuro Aoyama Meitaro Takeuchi Yoshisuke Aikawa William R
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Engine Displacement
Engine displacement is the swept volume of all the pistons inside the cylinders of a reciprocating engine in a single movement from top dead centre (TDC) to bottom dead centre (BDC). It is commonly specified in cubic centimetres (cc or cm3), litres (l), or cubic inches (CID). Engine displacement does not include the total volume of the combustion chamber.Contents1 Definition 2 Governmental regulations 3 Automotive model names 4 See also 5 ReferencesDefinition[edit] Engine displacement is determined from the bore and stroke of an engine's cylinders
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Diesel Engine
The diesel engine (also known as a compression-ignition or CI engine), named after Rudolf Diesel, is an internal combustion engine in which ignition of the fuel which is injected into the combustion chamber is caused by the elevated temperature of the air in the cylinder due to mechanical compression (adiabatic compression). Diesel engines work by compressing only the air. This increases the air temperature inside the cylinder to such a high degree that atomised diesel fuel that is injected into the combustion chamber ignites spontaneously. This contrasts with spark-ignition engines such as a petrol engine (gasoline engine) or gas engine (using a gaseous fuel as opposed to petrol), which use a spark plug to ignite an air-fuel mixture. In diesel engines, glow plugs (combustion chamber pre-warmers) may be used to aid starting in cold weather, or when the engine uses a lower compression-ratio, or both
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Japanese Domestic Market
The term "Japanese domestic market" refers to Japan's home market for vehicles. For the importer, these terms refer to vehicles and parts designed to conform to Japanese regulations and to suit Japanese buyers. Compared to the United States where vehicle owners are now owning vehicles for a longer period of time, with the average age of the American vehicle fleet at 10.8 years,[1] Japanese owners contend with a strict motor vehicle inspection and gray markets. According to the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile, a car in Japan travels a yearly average of over only 9,300 kilometers (5,800 miles), less than half the U.S. average of 19,100 kilometers (12,000 miles).[2] Japanese domestic market vehicles may differ greatly from the cars that Japanese manufacturers build for export and vehicles derived from the same platforms built in other countries
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Wheelbase
In both road and rail vehicles, the wheelbase is the distance between the centers of the front and rear wheels. For road vehicles with more than two axles (e.g. some trucks), the wheelbase is defined as the distance between the steering (front) axle and the centerpoint of the driving axle group. In the case of a tri-axle truck, the wheelbase would be the distance between the steering axle and a point midway between the two rear axles. Wheelbase
Wheelbase
(measured between rotational centers of wheels)Contents1 Vehicles1.1 Varying wheelbases within nameplate 1.2 Bikes 1.3 Skateboards2 Rail 3 See also 4 ReferencesVehicles[edit] The wheelbase of a vehicle equals the distance between its front and rear wheels. At equilibrium, the total torque of the forces acting on a vehicle is zero
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Car Platform
A car platform is a shared set of common design, engineering, and production efforts, as well as major components over a number of outwardly distinct models and even types of cars, often from different, but related marques.[2] It is practiced in the automotive industry to reduce the costs associated with the development of products by basing those products on a smaller number of platforms. This further allows companies to create distinct models from a design perspective on similar underpinnings.[2]Contents1 Definition and benefits 2 Examples 3 Advantages 4 Disadvantages 5 Top Hat 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksDefinition and benefits[edit] Platform sharing is a product development method where different products and the brand attached share the same components.[3] The purpose with platform sharing is to reduce the cost and have a more efficient product development process.[4] The companies gain on reduced procurement cost by taking advantage of the commona
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Rebadging
Badge
Badge
engineering, sometimes called rebadging, is the practice of applying a different badge or trademark (brand, logo or manufacturer's name/make/marque) to an existing product (e.g., an automobile) and subsequently marketing the variant as a distinct product.[1][2] Due to the high cost of designing and engineering a new model or establishing a brand (which may take many years to gain acceptance), economies of scale make it less expensive[3] to rebadge a product once or multiple times than to create different models. The term badge engineering is an intentionally ironic misnomer, in that little or no actual engineering takes place.[4][5] The term or
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Diesel Particulate Filter
A diesel particulate filter (or DPF) is a device designed to remove diesel particulate matter or soot from the exhaust gas of a diesel engine.[1][2]Contents1 Mode of action 2 History 3 Variants of DPFs3.1 Cordierite
Cordierite
wall flow filters 3.2 Silicon carbide
Silicon carbide
wall flow filters 3.3 Ceramic fiber filters 3.4 Metal fiber flow-through filters 3.5 Paper 3.6 Partial filters4 Maintenance 5 Safety 6 Regeneration 7 See also 8 Notes8.1 Citations9 External linksMode of action[edit] Wall-flow diesel particulate filters usually remove 85% or more of the soot, and under certain conditions can attain soot removal efficiencies approaching 100%. Some filters are single-use, intended for disposal and replacement once full of accumulated ash
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Overhead Valve
An overhead valve engine (OHV engine) is an engine in which the valves are placed in the cylinder head. This was an improvement over the older flathead engine, where the valves were placed in the cylinder block next to the piston. Overhead camshaft
Overhead camshaft
(OHC) engines, while still overhead valve by definition, are usually categorized apart from other OHV engines
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Anti-lock Braking System
An anti-lock braking system or anti-skid braking system[1] (ABS) is an automobile safety system that allows the wheels on a motor vehicle to maintain tractive contact with the road surface according to driver inputs while braking, preventing the wheels from locking up (ceasing rotation) and avoiding uncontrolled skidding. It is an automated system that uses the principles of threshold braking and cadence braking which were practiced by skillful drivers with previous generation braking systems. It does this at a much faster rate and with better control than many drivers could manage. ABS generally offers improved vehicle control and decreases stopping distances on dry and slippery surfaces; however, on loose gravel or snow-covered surfaces, ABS can significantly increase braking distance, although still improving vehicle steering control.[2][3][4] Since initial widespread use in production cars, anti-lock braking systems have been improved considerably
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Remote Keyless System
A keyless entry system is an electronic lock that controls access to a building or vehicle without using a traditional mechanical key. The term keyless entry system originally meant a lock controlled by a keypad located at or near the driver's door, which required entering a predetermined (or self-programmed) numeric code. Such systems now have a hidden touch-activated keypad and are still available on certain Ford and Lincoln models. The term remote keyless system (RKS), also called keyless entry or remote central locking, refers to a lock that uses an electronic remote control as a key which is activated by a handheld device or automatically by proximity.[1] Widely used in automobiles, an RKS performs the functions of a standard car key without physical contact. When within a few yards of the car, pressing a button on the remote can lock or unlock the doors, and may perform other functions
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2WD
Two-wheel drive (2WD) describes vehicles with a drivetrain that allows two wheels to receive power from the engine simultaneously.Contents1 Four-wheeled vehicles 2 Two-wheeled vehicles 3 Two-wheeled drive with sidecars 4 External linksFour-wheeled vehicles[edit] For four-wheeled vehicles (and by extension, vehicles with six, eight, or more wheels) this term is used to describe vehicles that are able to power at most two wheels, referred to as either front or rear-wheel drive. The term 4×2 is also used, to denote four total wheels with two being driven. Most road vehicles use a 2WD layout due to its light weight and simplicity
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