HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Maxentius
28 October 306 – 28 October 312 (in competition with Severus, then Galerius
Galerius
then Constantine – jointly with his father 306–8)Predecessor Constantius ChlorusSuccessor ConstantineCo-emperors Galerius
Galerius
(Eastern Emperor, 306-311) Maximinus II (Eastern Emperor, 311-312)Born c
[...More...]

"Maxentius" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Milan
Milan
Milan
(/mɪˈlæn, -ˈlɑːn/;[3] Italian: Milano [miˈlaːno] ( listen); Lombard: Milan
Milan
[miˈlãː] (Milanese variant))[4][5] is the capital of Lom
[...More...]

"Milan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roman Gaul
Roman Gaul
Gaul
refers to Gaul[1] under provincial rule in the Roman Empire from the 1st century BC to the 5th century AD. The Roman Republic
Roman Republic
began its takeover of Celtic Gaul
Gaul
in 121 BC, when it conquered and annexed the southern reaches of the area. Julius Caesar significantly advanced the task by defeating the Celtic tribes in the Gallic Wars
Gallic Wars
of 58-51 BC. In 22 BC, imperial administration of Gaul
Gaul
was reorganized, establishing the provinces of Gallia
Gallia
Aquitania, Gallia Belgica
Gallia Belgica
and Gallia
Gallia
Lugdunensis
[...More...]

"Roman Gaul" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mediolanum
Mediolanum, the ancient Milan, was originally an Insubrian city, but afterwards became an important Roman city in northern Italy. The city was settled by the Insubres
Insubres
around 600 BC, conquered by the Romans in 222 BC, and developed into a key centre of Western Christianity and capital of the Western Roman Empire. It declined under the ravages of the Gothic War, its capture by the Lombards
Lombards
in 569, and their decision to make Ticinum
Ticinum
the capital of their Kingdom of Italy. During the Principate
Principate
the population was 40,000 in 200 AD; when the city became capital of the Western Roman Empire
Western Roman Empire
under emperor Maximian (r
[...More...]

"Mediolanum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Africa (Roman Province)
French Algeria
Algeria
(19th - 20th centuries)French conquest French governorsResistance PacificationEmir Abdelkader Fatma N'SoumerMokrani Revolt Cheikh BouamamaNationalism RCUA FLN GPRAAlgerian War 1958 putsch 1961 putschÉvian Accords Independence referendumPied-Noir Harkis Oujda GroupContemporary era 1960s–80sArab nationalism 1965 putschBerber Spring 1988 Riots1990s Algerian Civil War
[...More...]

"Africa (Roman Province)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sicily
Sicily
Sicily
(/ˈsɪsɪli/ SISS-i-lee; Italian: Sicilia [siˈtʃiːlja], Sicilian: Sicìlia) is the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea. It is an autonomous region of Italy, in Southern Italy
Italy
along with surrounding minor islands, officially referred to as Regione Siciliana. Sicily
Sicily
is located in the central Mediterranean Sea, south of the Italian Peninsula, from which it is separated by the narrow Strait of Messina. Its most prominent landmark is Mount Etna, the tallest active volcano in Europe,[4] and one of the most active in the world, currently 3,329 m (10,922 ft) high
[...More...]

"Sicily" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Corsica Et Sardinia
The Province of Corsica
Corsica
and Sardinia
Sardinia
(Latin: Provincia Corsica
[...More...]

"Corsica Et Sardinia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lucania
Lucania
Lucania
(Greek: Λευκανία Leukanía) was an ancient area of Southern Italy. It was the land of the Lucani, an Oscan
Oscan
people. It extended from the Tyrrhenian Sea
Tyrrhenian Sea
to the Gulf of Taranto. It bordered with Samnium
Samnium
and Campania
Campania
in the north, Apulia
Apulia
in the east, and Bruttium
Bruttium
in the south-west—at the top of the peninsula which now called Calabria. It thus comprised almost all the modern region of Basilicata, the southern part of the province of Salerno
Salerno
(the Cilento area) and a northern portion of the province of Cosenza. The precise limits were the river Silarus in the north-west, which separated it from Campania, and the Bradanus, which flows into the Gulf of Taranto, in the east
[...More...]

"Lucania" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Zosimus
Zosimus (Greek: Ζώσιμος [ˈzosimos]; also known by the Latin name Zosimus Historicus, i.e. " Zosimus the Historian"; fl. 490s–510s) was a Greek historian who lived in Constantinople
Constantinople
during the reign of the Eastern Roman Emperor
Eastern Roman Emperor
Anastasius I (491–518). According to Photius, he was a comes, and held the office of "advocate" of the imperial treasury.[1] Zosimus was also known for condemning Constantine’s rejection of the pagan gods.Contents1 Historia Nova 2 Editions 3 References 4 External linksHistoria Nova[edit] Zosimus' Historia Nova (Ἱστορία Νέα, "New History") is written in Greek in six books. For the period from 238 to 270, he apparently uses Dexippus; for the period from 270 to 404, Eunapius; and after 407, Olympiodorus
[...More...]

"Zosimus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Alps
The Alps
Alps
(/ælps/; French: Alpes [alp]; German: Alpen [ˈalpn̩]; Italian: Alpi [ˈalpi]; Romansh: Alps; Slovene: Alpe [ˈáːlpɛ]) are the highest and most extensive mountain range system that lies entirely in Europe,[2][note 1] stretching approximately 1,200 kilometres (750 mi) across eight Alpine countries
Alpine countries
(from west to east): France, Switzerland, Italy, Monaco, Liechtenstein, Austria, Germany, and Slovenia.[3] The mountains were formed over tens of millions of years as the African and Eurasian tectonic plates collided. Extreme shortening caused by the event resulted in marine sedimentary rocks rising by thrusting and folding into high mountain peaks such as Mont Blanc
Mont Blanc
and the Matterhorn. Mont Blanc
Mont Blanc
spans the French–Italian border, and at 4,810 m (15,781 ft) is the highest mountain in the Alps
[...More...]

"Alps" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rome
Rome
Rome
(/roʊm/ ROHM; Italian: Roma i[ˈroːma]; Latin: Roma [ˈroːma]) is the capital of Italy
Italy
and a special comune (named Comune
Comune
di Roma Capitale). Rome
Rome
also serves as the capital of the Lazio
Lazio
region. With 2,874,558 residents in 1,285 km2 (496.1 sq mi),[1] it is also the country's most populated comune. It is the fourth-most populous city in the European Union
European Union
by population within city limits. It is the centre of the Metropolitan City of Rome, which has a population of 4.3 million residents.[2] Rome
Rome
is located in the central-western portion of the Italian Peninsula, within Lazio (Latium), along the shores of the Tiber
[...More...]

"Rome" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lactantius
Lucius Caecilius Firmianus Lactantius
Lactantius
(c. 250 – c. 325) was an early Christian author who became an advisor to the first Christian Roman emperor, Constantine I, guiding his religious policy as it developed,[1] and a tutor to his son. His most important work is the Institutiones Divinae
Institutiones Divinae
("The Divine Institutes"), an apologetic treatise intended to establish the reasonableness and truth of Christianity
Christianity
to pagan critics.Contents1 Biography 2 Writing 3 Prophetic exegesis 4 Works 5 See also 6 References 7 Sources 8 External linksBiography[edit] Lactantius, a Latin-speaking North African of Berber origin,[2][3][4][5] was not born into a Christian family. He was a pupil of Arnobius
Arnobius
who taught at Sicca Veneria, an important city in Numidia
[...More...]

"Lactantius" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Istria
Istria
Istria
(/ˈɪstriə/ IST-ree-ya; Croatian, Slovene: Istra; Istriot: Eîstria; Italian: Istria; German: Istrien), formerly Histria (Latin), is the largest peninsula in the Adriatic Sea. The peninsula is located at the head of the Adriatic between the Gulf of Trieste
Gulf of Trieste
and the Kvarner Gulf
[...More...]

"Istria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Augustus (honorific)
Augustus
Augustus
(plural augusti; /ɔːˈɡʌstəs/;[1]Classical Latin: [awˈɡʊstʊs], Latin
Latin
for "majestic", "the increaser" or "venerable"), was an ancient Roman title given as both name and title to Gaius Octavius (often referred to simply as Augustus), Rome's first Emperor. On his death, it became an official title of his successor, and was so used by Roman emperors thereafter. The feminine form Augusta was used for Roman empresses and other females of the Imperial family. The masculine and feminine forms originated in the time of the Roman Republic, in connection with things considered divine or sacred in traditional Roman religion
[...More...]

"Augustus (honorific)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Caesar (title)
Caesar (English pl. Caesars; Latin
Latin
pl. Caesares) is a title of imperial character. It derives from the cognomen of Julius Caesar, the Roman dictator
[...More...]

"Caesar (title)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Follis
The follis (plural folles; Italian: follaro, Arabic: fels‎) was a type of coin in the Roman and Byzantine traditions.Contents1 Roman coin 2 Byzantine coin 3 See also 4 References 5 Sources 6 External linksRoman coin[edit]Caesar Constantius II
Constantius II
on a follis AE3 of Heraclea of the year 325.In the past the word 'follis' was used to describe a large bronze Roman coin introduced in about 294 (the actual name of this coin is unknown [1]) at the time of the coinage reform of Diocletian. It weighed about 10 grams and was about 4% silver, mostly as a thin layer on the surface. However, later studies have shown that this is wrong, and that this coin may have been known as a 'nummus'. The word follis means bag (usually made of leather) in Latin, and there is evidence that this term was used in antiquity for a sealed bag containing a specific amount of coinage
[...More...]

"Follis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.