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Maumee River
The Maumee River
River
(pronounced /mɔːˈmiː/)[1] (Shawnee: Hotaawathiipi;[2] Miami-Illinois: Taawaawa siipiiw)[3] is a river running from northeastern Indiana
Indiana
into northwestern Ohio
Ohio
and Lake Erie in the United States. It is formed at the confluence of the St. Joseph and St. Marys rivers, where Fort
Fort
Wayne, Indiana, has developed, and meanders northeastwardly for 137 miles (220 km)[4] through an agricultural region of glacial moraines before flowing into the Maumee Bay of Lake Erie. Toledo, Ohio, developed at the Maumee River's mouth. The Maumee was designated an Ohio
Ohio
State Scenic River
River
on July 18, 1974. The Maumee watershed is Ohio’s breadbasket; it is two-thirds farmland, mostly corn and soybeans
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Eutrophication
Eutrophication
Eutrophication
(from Greek eutrophos, "well-nourished"),[1] or hypertrophication, is when a body of water becomes overly enriched with minerals and nutrients that induce excessive growth of plants and algae.[2] This process may result in oxygen depletion of the water body.[3] One example is the "bloom" or great increase of phytoplankton in a water body as a response to increased levels of nutrients. Eutrophication
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Treaty Of Greenville
The Treaty of Greenville
Treaty of Greenville
was signed on August 3, 1795, at Fort Greenville, now Greenville, Ohio; it followed negotiations after the Native American loss at the Battle of Fallen Timbers
Battle of Fallen Timbers
a year earlier. It ended the Northwest Indian War
Northwest Indian War
in the Ohio Country
Ohio Country
and limited strategic parcels of land to the north and west. The parties to the treaty were a coalition of Native American tribes, known as the Western Confederacy, and United States
United States
government represented by General
General
Anthony Wayne
Anthony Wayne
for local frontiersmen
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Drainage Basin
A drainage basin is any area of land where precipitation collects and drains off into a common outlet, such as into a river, bay, or other body of water
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River
A river is a natural flowing watercourse, usually freshwater, flowing towards an ocean, sea, lake or another river. In some cases a river flows into the ground and becomes dry at the end of its course without reaching another body of water. Small rivers can be referred to using names such as stream, creek, brook, rivulet, and rill. There are no official definitions for the generic term river as applied to geographic features,[1] although in some countries or communities a stream is defined by its size. Many names for small rivers are specific to geographic location; examples are "run" in some parts of the United States, "burn" in Scotland and northeast England, and "beck" in northern England. Sometimes a river is defined as being larger than a creek,[2] but not always: the language is vague.[3] Rivers are part of the hydrological cycle
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Agriculture
Agriculture
Agriculture
is the cultivation and breeding of animals and plants to provide food, fiber, medicinal plants and other products to sustain and enhance life.[1] Agriculture
Agriculture
was the key development in the rise of sedentary human civilization, whereby farming of domesticated species created food surpluses that enabled people to live in cities. The study of agriculture is known as agricultural science. The history of agriculture dates back thousands of years; people gathered wild grains at least 105,000 years ago, and began to plant them around 11,500 years ago, before they became domesticated. Pigs, sheep, and cattle were domesticated over 10,000 years ago. Crops originate from at least 11 regions of the world
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Glacial Moraines
A moraine is any glacially formed accumulation of unconsolidated glacial debris (regolith and rock) that occurs in both currently and formerly glaciated regions on Earth (i.e. a past glacial maximum), through geomorphological processes. Moraines are formed from debris previously carried along by a glacier and normally consist of somewhat rounded particles ranging in size from large boulders to minute glacial flour. Lateral moraines are formed at the side of the ice flow and terminal moraines at the foot, marking the maximum advance of the glacier
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Native Americans In The United States
American Indian and Alaska
Alaska
Native (2010 Census Bureau)[1] One race: 2,932,248 are registered In combination with one or more of the other races listed: 2,288,331 Total: 5,220,579 ~ 1.6% of the total U.S
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Great Miami River
The Great Miami River
Great Miami River
(also called the Miami River) (Shawnee: Msimiyamithiipi[2]) is a tributary of the Ohio
Ohio
River, approximately 160 miles (260 km) long,[3] in southwestern Ohio
Ohio
and Indiana
Indiana
in the United States. The Great Miami flows through Dayton, Piqua, Troy, Hamilton, and Sidney. The river is named for the Miami, an Algonquian-speaking Native American people who lived in the region during the early days of European settlement.[4] They were forced to relocate to the west to escape European-American settlement pressure. The region surrounding the Great Miami River
Great Miami River
is known as the Miami Valley. This term is used in the upper portions of the valley as a moniker for the economic-cultural region centered primarily on the Greater Dayton
Greater Dayton
area
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Anthony Wayne
Anthony Wayne
Anthony Wayne
(January 1, 1745 – December 15, 1796) was a United States Army officer and statesman. Wayne adopted a military career at the outset of the American Revolutionary War, where his military exploits and fiery personality quickly earned him promotion to brigadier general and the sobriquet Mad Anthony. He later served as the Senior Officer of the Army and led the Legion of the United States. Born in Chester County, Pennsylvania, Wayne worked as a tanner and surveyor after attending the College of Philadelphia. He won election to the Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
General Assembly and, in 1775, helped raise a Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
militia unit. During the Revolutionary War, Wayne served in the Invasion of Quebec, the Philadelphia
Philadelphia
campaign, and the Yorktown campaign
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Treaty Of Fort Meigs
The Treaty of Fort Meigs, also called the Treaty of the Foot of the Rapids, was signed September 29, 1817 between the chiefs and warriors of the Wyandot, Seneca, Delaware, Shawnee, Potawatomi, Ottawa and Chippewa, tribes of Native Americans and the United States of America, represented by Lewis Cass and Duncan McArthur. The accord contained twenty-one articles. With this last treaty, the Native American tribes of the Ohio Valley ceded all their remaining land to the United States, which started an auction and sold the land to white settlers. In fact, most of that land was already occupied by settlers, but as it was officially part of the Indian Territory, the federal government limited tribes' ability to enforce the rule of law among the white inhabitants. The Treaty of Fort Meigs was signed between the United States and various Native American tribes five days after the laying of the cornerstone for the fledgling University of Michigan campus near the corner of Bates St
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Canal
Canals, or navigations, are human-made channels, or artificial waterways, for water conveyance, or to service water transport vehicles. In most cases, the engineered works will have a series of dams and locks that create reservoirs of low speed current flow. These reservoirs are referred to as slack water levels, often just called levels. A canal is also known as a navigation when it parallels a river and shares part of its waters and drainage basin, and leverages its resources by building dams and locks to increase and lengthen its stretches of slack water levels while staying in its valley. In contrast, a canal cuts across a drainage divide atop a ridge, generally requiring an external water source above the highest elevation. Many canals have been built at elevations towering over valleys and other water ways crossing far below. Canals with sources of water at a higher level can deliver water to a destination such as a city where water is needed
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Portage
Portage
Portage
or portaging is the practice of carrying water craft or cargo over land, either around an obstacle in a river, or between two bodies of water. A place where this carrying occurs is also called a portage. Early French explorers in New France
New France
and French Louisiana encountered many rapids and cascades. The Native Americans carried their canoes over land to avoid river obstacles. Over time, important portages were sometimes provided with canals with locks, and even portage railways. Primitive portaging generally involves carrying the vessel and its contents across the portage in multiple trips. Small canoes can be portaged by carrying them inverted over one's shoulders and the center strut may be designed in the style of a yoke to facilitate this
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Fort
Fortifications are military constructions, or buildings, designed for the defense of territories in warfare and also used to solidify rule in a region during peace time. For many thousands of years, humans have constructed defensive works in a variety of increasingly complex designs. The term is derived from the Latin
Latin
fortis ("strong") and facere ("to make"). From very early history to modern times, walls have often been necessary for cities to survive in an ever-changing world of invasion and conquest. Some settlements in the Indus Valley Civilization
Indus Valley Civilization
were the first small cities to be fortified. In ancient Greece, large stone walls had been built in Mycenaean Greece, such as the ancient site of Mycenae
Mycenae
(famous for the huge stone blocks of its 'cyclopean' walls)
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Fort Loramie
Fort Loramie is a village in Shelby County, Ohio, United States, along Loramie Creek. The population was 1,478 at the 2010 census
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