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Maud De Braose
Maud de Braose, Lady of Bramber (c. 1155 – 1210) was an English noble, the spouse of William de Braose, 4th Lord of Bramber, a powerful Marcher
Marcher
baron and court favourite of King John of England. She would later incur the wrath and enmity of the King who caused her to be starved to death in the dungeon of Corfe Castle
Corfe Castle
along with her eldest son.[1] She features in many Welsh myths and legends; and is also known to history as Matilda de Braose, Moll Wallbee, and Lady of La Haie.Contents1 Family and marriage1.1 Issue2 Enmity of King John2.1 Imprisonment at Corfe Castle3 In fiction 4 References 5 BibliographyFamily and marriage[edit] She was born Maud de St. Valery (Maud de Saint-Valéry) in France in about 1155, the child of Bernard de St. Valéry[2][3] of Hinton Waldrist in Berkshire
Berkshire
(now Oxfordshire)[4] and his first wife, Matilda. Her paternal grandfather was Reginald de St
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Kington, Herefordshire
Kington is a market town, electoral ward and civil parish in Herefordshire, England. According to the Parish, the ward had a population of 3,240 while the 2011 census had a population of 2,626.[1][2]Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Governance 4 Population 5 Climate 6 Economy6.1 Kington Connected (KC3)7 Education 8 Transport 9 Sport 10 Tourism 11 Twinning 12 Notable people 13 In popular culture 14 See also 15 References 16 External linksGeography[edit] Kington is 2.0 miles (3.2 km) from the border with Wales and, despite being on the western side of Offa's Dyke, has been English for over a thousand years. The town is in the shadow of Hergest Ridge, and on the River Arrow, where it is crossed by the A44 road. It is 19 miles (31 km) north-west of Hereford, the county town. Nearby towns include Presteigne, Builth Wells, Knighton and Leominster
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Briouze
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Briouze
Briouze
is a commune in the Orne
Orne
department of Normandy
Normandy
in northwestern France. It is considered the capital of the pays d'Houlme at the western end of the Orne
Orne
in the Norman bocage
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Builth Wells
Builth
Builth
Wells (/ˈbɪlθ ˈwɛlz/; Welsh: Llanfair ym Muallt) is a town and electoral ward in the county of Powys, within the historic boundaries of Brecknockshire, mid Wales, lying at the confluence of the River Wye
River Wye
and the River Irfon, in the Welsh (or Upper) section of the Wye Valley. It has a population of 2,568, or 2,994 including the neighbouring village of Llanelwedd
Llanelwedd
in Radnorshire.Contents1 Etymology 2 History and geography2.1 Builth
Builth
Castle3 Livestock breeds 4 Industry 5 Transport 6 Education and recreation 7 Notable people 8 Buildings and landmarks 9 References 10 External linksEtymology[edit] Builth
Builth
is an anglicization of the Welsh Buellt
Buellt
or Buallt. It derives from the Welsh words bu, meaning "ox", and gellt (later gwellt), meaning "pasture", rendering "cow pasture"
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Abergavenny
Abergavenny
Abergavenny
(/ˌæbərɡəˈvɛni/; Welsh: Y Fenni pronounced [ə ˈvɛnɪ], archaically Abergafenni meaning "Mouth of the River Gavenny") is a market town in Monmouthshire, Wales. Abergavenny
Abergavenny
is promoted as a Gateway to Wales.[1][2] It is located on the A40 trunk road and the A465 Heads of the Valleys road and is approximately 6 miles (9.7 km) from the border with England. Originally the site of a Roman fort, Gobannium, it became a medieval walled town within the Welsh Marches
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Corfe Castle
Corfe Castle
Castle
is a fortification standing above the village of the same name on the Isle of Purbeck
Isle of Purbeck
in the English county of Dorset. Built by William the Conqueror, the castle dates to the 11th century and commands a gap in the Purbeck Hills
Purbeck Hills
on the route between Wareham and Swanage. The first phase was one of the earliest castles in England to be built at least partly using stone when the majority were built with earth and timber. Corfe Castle
Castle
underwent major structural changes in the 12th and 13th centuries. In 1572, Corfe Castle
Castle
left the Crown's control when Elizabeth I sold it to Sir Christopher Hatton. Sir John Bankes
John Bankes
bought the castle in 1635, and was the owner during the English Civil War
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Painscastle
Painscastle (Welsh: Castell-paen) is a village and community in Powys, Wales and also a village which takes its name from the castle. It lies between Builth and Hay-on-Wye, approximately 3 miles from the Wales-England border today. The community also includes the villages and settlements of Rhosgoch, Bryngwyn and Llanbedr.[1] The population as of the 2011 UK Census was 524. It is represented by the Painscastle and Rhoscogh Community Council, which comprises eight community councillors.[2] It is included in the Glasbury electoral ward for Powys County Council elections. Castle[edit] Main article: Painscastle Castle Little now remains of the castle that gives the village its name, other than the massive earthworks. The first castle would appear to have been built by Pain fitzJohn and probably destroyed after his death in 1137
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Skenfrith
Skenfrith
Skenfrith
(Welsh: Ynysgynwraidd) is a small village in Monmouthshire, south-east Wales. It is located on the River Monnow, close to the border between Wales
Wales
and England, about 6 miles (9.7 km) north-west of Monmouth. The road through the village (B4521) was once the A40, linking Ross-on-Wye
Ross-on-Wye
and Abergavenny.Contents1 History and amenities 2 Friends of St
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Grosmont Castle
Grosmont Castle
Castle
is a ruined castle in the village of Grosmont, Monmouthshire, Wales. The fortification was established by the Normans in the wake of the invasion of England in 1066, to protect the route from Wales
Wales
to Hereford. Possibly commissioned by William fitz Osbern, the Earl of Hereford, it was originally an earthwork design with timber defences. In 1135, a major Welsh revolt took place, and in response King Stephen brought together Grosmont Castle
Castle
and its sister fortifications of Skenfrith and White Castle
Castle
to form a lordship known as the "Three Castles", which continued to play a role in defending the region from Welsh attack for several centuries. King John gave the castle to a powerful royal official, Hubert de Burgh, in 1201
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White Castle (Wales)
White Castle
Castle
(Welsh: Castell Gwyn), also known historically as Llantilio Castle, is a ruined castle near the village of Llantilio Crossenny in Monmouthshire, Wales. The fortification was established by the Normans
Normans
in the wake of the invasion of England in 1066, to protect the route from Wales
Wales
to Hereford. Possibly commissioned by William fitz Osbern, the Earl of Hereford, it comprised three large earthworks with timber defences. In 1135, a major Welsh revolt took place and in response King Stephen brought together White Castle
Castle
and its sister fortifications of Grosmont and Skenfrith to form a lordship known as the "Three Castles", which continued to play a role in defending the region from Welsh attack for several centuries. King John gave the castle to a powerful royal official, Hubert de Burgh, in 1201
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Normandy
Normandy
Normandy
(/ˈnɔːrməndi/; French: Normandie, pronounced [nɔʁmɑ̃di] ( listen), Norman: Normaundie, from Old French
Old French
Normanz, plural of Normant, originally from the word for "northman" in several Scandinavian languages)[2] is one of the 18 regions of France, roughly corresponding to the historical Duchy of Normandy. Administratively, Normandy
Normandy
is divided into five départements: Calvados, Eure, Manche, Orne, and Seine-Maritime. It covers 30,627 square kilometres (11,825 sq mi),[3] comprising roughly 5% of the territory of metropolitan France
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William Brewer (justice)
William Brewer (alias Briwere, Brigwer, etc.) (died 1226) of Tor Brewer[2] in Devon, was a prominent administrator and judge in England during the reigns of kings Richard I, his brother King John, and John's son Henry III. He was a major landholder and the founder of several religious institutions
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Limerick
Limerick
Limerick
(/ˈlɪmrɪk, -mərɪk/;[4] Irish: Luimneach [ˈl̪imʲɨnʲəx]) is a city in County Limerick, Ireland. It is located in the Mid-West Region and is also part of the province of Munster. Limerick City and County Council
Limerick City and County Council
is the local authority for the city. The city lies on the River Shannon, with the historic core of the city located on King's Island, which is bounded by the Shannon and the Abbey River. Limerick
Limerick
is also located at the head of the Shannon Estuary where the river widens before it flows into the Atlantic Ocean
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Ireland
Ireland
Ireland
(/ˈaɪərlənd/ ( listen); Irish: Éire [ˈeːɾʲə] ( listen); Ulster-Scots: Airlann [ˈɑːrlən]) is an island in the North Atlantic. It is separated from Great Britain
Great Britain
to its east by the North Channel, the Irish Sea, and St George's Channel. Ireland
Ireland
is the third-largest island in Europe. Politically, Ireland
Ireland
is divided between the Republic of Ireland (officially named Ireland), which covers five-sixths of the island, and Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom. In 2011, the population of Ireland
Ireland
was about 6.6 million, ranking it the second-most populous island in Europe
Europe
after Great Britain
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Tetbury
Tetbury
Tetbury
is a small town and civil parish within the Cotswold district of Gloucestershire, England. It lies on the site of an ancient hill fort, on which an Anglo-Saxon monastery was founded, probably by Ine of Wessex, in 681. The population of the parish was 5,250 in the 2001 census, increasing to 5,472 at the 2011 census.[1] During the Middle Ages, Tetbury
Tetbury
became an important market for Cotswold wool and yarn
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Elfael
Elfael
Elfael
was one of a number of Welsh cantrefi occupying the region between the River Wye
River Wye
and river Severn, known as Rhwng Gwy a Hafren, in the early Middle Ages. It was divided into two commotes, Is Mynydd and Uwch Mynydd, separated by the chain of hills above Aberedw
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