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Mau Mau Uprising
 British Empire Kenya Uganda ProtectorateMau Mau rebels[A]Commanders and leaders Winston Churchill
Winston Churchill
(1951–1955) Anthony Eden
Anthony Ed

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Forced Labour
Unfree labour
Unfree labour
is a generic or collective term for those work relations, especially in modern or early modern history, in which people are employed against their will with the threat of destitution, detention, violence (including death), compulsion,[1] or other forms of extreme hardship to themselves or members of their families. Unfree labour
Unfree labour
includes all forms of slavery, and related institutions (e.g. debt slavery, serfdom, corvée and labour camps)
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Capital Punishment
Capital punishment, also known as the death penalty, is a government-sanctioned practice whereby a person is put to death by the state as a punishment for a crime. The sentence that someone be punished in such a manner is referred to as a death sentence, whereas the act of carrying out the sentence is known as an execution. Crimes that are punishable by death are known as capital crimes or capital offences, and they commonly include offences such as murder, treason, espionage, war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide. Etymologically, the term capital (lit
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Operation Mushroom
Operation
Operation
or Operations may refer to:Scientific operation Surgery, or operationContents1 Mathematics and computer science 2 Military 3 Business 4 Other uses 5 See alsoMathematics and computer science[edit] Operation
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Meru People
The Meru, Amîîrú, "Ameru" or Ngaa people are a Bantu ethnic group that inhabit the Meru region of Kenya
Kenya
on the fertile lands of north and eastern slopes of Mount Kenya, in the former Eastern Province of Kenya. The name "Meru" refers to both the people and the region, which for many years was the only administrative unit. In 1992, the Greater Meru was divided into three administrative units: Meru Central, (Nyambene), and Tharaka-Nithi (Tharaka and Meru South)
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Embu People
The Embu are a Bantu people inhabiting Embu county in Kenya. They speak the Bantu Embu language as a mother tongue. To the south of Embu are to be found their cousins, the Mbeere
Mbeere
people. In essence Embu county encompasses the ethnic Kîembu dialect (Embu proper), from whom the Embu county's name derives, and the Kimbere dialect spoken by their Mbeere
Mbeere
counterparts who inhabit the lower reaches of the county. Historically, both were just referred to as the Embu people. To the west, Embu neighbours are the closely related Kikuyu in Kirinyaga, Nyeri, Kiambu, Muranga and Nyandarua counties. The Meru people border the Embu to the East.Contents1 Origin 2 History 3 Economic activities 4 Tourist attractions 5 See also 6 Further reading 7 ReferencesOrigin[edit] The Embu are of Bantu origin.[2] They inhabit the southern windward slopes and farmlands of Mount Kenya
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Assassination Of Waruhiu
Note: Varies by jurisdictionAssassination Cannibalism Child murder Consensual homicide Contract killing Crime of passion Depraved-heart murder Execution-style murder Felony murder rule Feticide Honor killing Human sacrifice InfanticideChild sacrificeInternet homicide Lonely hearts killer Lust murder Lynching Mass murder Mass shooting Misdemeanor murder Murder–suicide Poisoning Proxy murder Pseudocommando Serial killer Spree killer Thrill killing Torture murder Vehicle-ramming attackManslaughterIn English law Voluntary manslaughter Negligent homicide Vehicular homicideNon-criminal homicideNote: Varies by jurisdictionAssisted suicide Capital punishment Euthanasia Feticide Justifiable homicide WarBy victim or victimsSuicideFamily Avunculi
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Kenya Regiment
The Kenya
Kenya
Regiment was a British military
British military
unit recruited from white settlers in colonial Kenya
Kenya
and Uganda. It was formed in 1937 and was disbanded in May 1963.Contents1 History 2 Notable personnel 3 References 4 Bibliography 5 External linksHistory[edit] The regiment was formed in the aftermath of the Abyssinia Crisis (1935). Fearing an Italian threat to the British colonies in East Africa, the Colonial Office
Colonial Office
ordered the reform of the military units in Kenya
Kenya
Colony. A section of the Territorial Army was established for white settlers, alongside the existent King's African Rifles
King's African Rifles
(KAR) that recruited black soldiers under white officers
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Indians In Kenya
Indians in Kenya
Kenya
(also referred to as Kenyan Asians) are citizens and residents of Kenya
Kenya
with ancestral roots in the Indian subcontinent. Most are found in the major urban areas of
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Divide And Rule
Divide and rule
Divide and rule
(or divide and conquer, from Latin
Latin
dīvide et imperā) in politics and sociology is gaining and maintaining power by breaking up larger concentrations of power into pieces that individually have less power than the one implementing the strategy. The concept refers to a strategy that breaks up existing power structures, and especially prevents smaller power groups from linking up, causing rivalries and fomenting discord among the people.[1] Traiano Boccalini cites "divide et impera" in La bilancia politica[2] as a common principle in politics. The use of this technique is meant to empower the sovereign to control subjects, populations, or factions of different interests, who collectively might be able to oppose his rule
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Missing In Action
.Grave of an unknown British Lance Corporal of the 50th Division, killed on D-day. Buried in Bayeux War
War
CemeteryGrave of an unknown paratrooper, killed in the Battle of Arnhem, 1944. Photographed in April 1945Graves of 11 unknown British combatants killed during World War
War
II, in Rhodes
Rhodes
CWGC war cemeteryGrave of an unknown Indian Army combatant in Lae War
War
Cemetery, Papua New GuineaWall crypts containing remains of unknown Italian combatants killed during World War
War
II, in a Rhodes
Rhodes
cemeteryGrave of an unknown American combatant in Oise-Aisne Cemetery. Killed in 1917Graves of unknown French combatants killed during World War
War
One
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Metropole
The metropole (from the Greek metropolis for "mother city") is the homeland or central territory of a colonial empire. The term was mainly used in the scope of the British, French and Portuguese empires to designate their European territories, as opposed to their colonial or overseas territories.Contents1 British Empire 2 Portuguese Empire 3 Footnotes 4 ReferencesBritish Empire[edit] The Metropole is the British metropolitan centre of the British Empire; i.e., the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
itself
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Swynnerton Plan
Swynnerton
Swynnerton
is a village and civil parish in Staffordshire, England. It lies in the Borough of Stafford, and at the 2001 census had a population of 4,233,[2] increasing to 4,453 at the 2011 Census. Swynnerton
Swynnerton
is listed in the Domesday Book
Domesday Book
identifying the lord in 1066 as Brothir (of Oaken) and in 1086, Edelo (of Rauceby), who was in service to Robert de Stafford, the tenant-in-chief. The record shows the settlement consisted of ten villagers' households, and five smallholders. Property consisted of eight ploughlands suitable for one lord's plough teams, and six men's plough teams. Other resources are listed as ten acres of meadow, and one league of woodland. The owner's value was estimated at £2.[3] St Mary's Church dates back to at least the 13th century, and as far back as the 11th century.[4][5] Swynnerton
Swynnerton
received its charter from Edward I in 1306
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Swahili Language
Swahili, also known as Kiswahili (translation: coast language[7]), is a Bantu language and the first language of the Swahili people
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Backronym
A backronym, or bacronym, is a constructed phrase that purports to be the source of a word that is an acronym. Backronyms may be invented with serious or humorous intent, or may be a type of false etymology or folk etymology. An acronym is a word derived from the initial letters of the words of a phrase:[1] For example, the word radar comes from "RAdio Detection And Ranging".[2] By contrast, a backronym is constructed by creating a new phrase to fit an already existing word, name, or acronym
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Mzungu
Mzungu (pronounced [m̩ˈzuŋɡu]) is a Bantu language term used in the African Great Lakes
African Great Lakes
region to refer to people of European descent. It is a commonly used expression among Bantu peoples
Bantu peoples
in Kenya, Tanzania, Malawi, Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda, Democratic Republic of Congo, Comoros, Mayotte
Mayotte
and Zambia, dating back to the 18th century. Literally translated it meant "someone who roams around" or "wanderer."[1] The term was first used in the African Great Lakes region to describe European explorers in the 18th century, apparently as a result of their extensive travelling all over the world. The word Mzungu comes from Kiswahili, where zungu or zunguka is the word for spinning around on the same spot. Kizunguzungu is Kiswahili for a dizziness.[2] The term is now used to refer to "someone with white skin" or "white skin"
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