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Matthew De Crambeth
Matthew de Crambeth (died 1309) was a late 13th and early 14th century bishop of Dunkeld. He had been a dean of the bishopric of Aberdeen and was a canon of the diocese of Dunkeld when, following the death of Bishop William, he was elected to the bishopric. He was consecrated at the hands of Pope Nicholas IV
Pope Nicholas IV
himself in 1288. His appointment appears to have had the backing of King Edward I of England. He was present at the Convention of Birgham on 17 March 1290. He was sent to France
France
in 1295 by King John Balliol to negotiate with the French king. He joined other prominent Scots in revolt against the English crown, and subsequently had his possessions confiscated. He was ambassador to France
France
in 1303. He is recorded as swearing fealty to King Edward on 4 May 1304, upon which act he had his personal and episcopal possessions restored to him
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Robert De Stuteville
Robert de Stuteville
Robert de Stuteville
(died 1283) was Bishop-elect of St Andrews
St Andrews
and Bishop of Dunkeld. Robert was dean of Dunkeld as early as 1253, when he was elected to the bishopric of St Andrews
St Andrews
on 28 June that year. His election was opposed by the king, at the time, Alexander III, and by the bishopric's Céli Dé chapter. The prior and the canons sent Robert to Rome, but a delegation of the king, including Abel de Golynn, was also sent, and the result was that Robert's election was quashed. Robert remained dean in Dunkeld. In 1273, after the death of Bishop Richard de Inverkeithing, Robert was elected to succeed him. In the following year, the Pope commanded the Bishop of Moray, the Bishop of Aberdeen and the Bishop of Glasgow
Bishop of Glasgow
to investigate his election. The investigation was successful and led to his consecration
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Treaty Of Birgham
The Treaty of Birgham, also referred to as the Treaty of Salisbury,[1] comprised two treaties intended to secure the independence of Scotland after the death of Alexander III and accession of his granddaughter Margaret in 1286. In reference to the above point that the treaties of Birgham
Birgham
and Salisbury
Salisbury
are one and the same. This is not accurate. The treaty of Salisbury
Salisbury
was concluded in 1289 and relates to the arrangements by which Edward I would secure the transport of the Maid of Norway from her homeland to Edward's own custody until Scotland
Scotland
was made safe for her to take up her right as queen
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Dean (religion)
A dean, in a church context, is a cleric holding certain positions of authority within a religious hierarchy. The title is used mainly in the Anglican Communion, the Roman Catholic Church, and many Lutheran denominations. A dean's assistant is called a subdean.Contents1 Officials 2 Anglican Communion2.1 Cathedrals 2.2 Rural or area deaneries 2.3 Other uses3 Catholic Church 4 Lutheran Church 5 United Methodism 6 Other uses 7 See also 8 ReferencesOfficials[edit] In the church, the Dean of the College of Cardinals
Dean of the College of Cardinals
and the Cardinal Vice-Dean are the president and vice-president of the college. Both are elected. Except for presiding and delegating administrative tasks, they have no authority over the cardinals, acting as primus inter pares (first among equals). In the academic community, the Dean is the academic leader of the Faculty who presides over the Faculty Board and administration
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John Dowden
Right Rev John Dowden
John Dowden
DD LLD (29 June 1840 – 30 January 1910) was an Irish-born bishop and ecclesiastical historian. He served in the Scottish Episcopal Church as the Bishop of Edinburgh.Contents1 Life 2 Scholarly work 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksLife[edit] He was born in Cork on 29 June 1840, as the fifth of five children of John Wheeler Dowden and Alicia Bennett. His famous brother was the poet, professor and literary critic Edward Dowden. Although his father was Presbyterian, John followed his mother by becoming an Anglican, although he attended both churches in his youth. When he was sixteen he became a student at Queen's College, Cork
Queen's College, Cork
as a medical student. John began encountering health problems, problems which made it difficult to pursue his original career. In 1858, while contemplating a religious career, he enrolled at Trinity College, Dublin
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Fife
Fife
Fife
([ˈfəif]; Scottish Gaelic: Fìobha) is a council area and historic county of Scotland. It is situated between the Firth of Tay and the Firth of Forth, with inland boundaries to Perth and Kinross and Clackmannanshire. By custom it is widely held to have been one of the major Pictish kingdoms, known as Fib, and is still commonly known as the Kingdom of Fife
Fife
within Scotland. Fife
Fife
is one of the six local authorities part of the Edinburgh
Edinburgh
and South East Scotland
Scotland
city region. It is a lieutenancy area, and was a county of Scotland
Scotland
until 1975. It was very occasionally known by the anglicisation Fifeshire in old documents and maps compiled by English cartographers and authors
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Kinross
Kinross
Kinross
(Gaelic: Ceann Rois) is a burgh in Perth and Kinross, Scotland. It is the traditional county town of the historic county of Kinross-shire.Contents1 Location and transport 2 Tourism 3 Population 4 Sport and recreation 5 Notable people 6 Twinned Cities 7 Schools 8 References 9 External linksLocation and transport[edit] The site of the original parish church and churchyard are located down a small wynd overlooking Loch
Loch
Leven, a little away from the town.A map of Kinross
Kinross
from 1945 Kinross
Kinross
was originally linked by railway to Perthshire, Fife
Fife
and Clackmannanshire
Clackmannanshire
until the rail links gradually disappeared. At one time three independent railway companies had their termini at the town
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France
France
France
(French: [fʁɑ̃s]), officially the French Republic (French: République française [ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.[XIII] The metropolitan area of France
France
extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean. The overseas territories include French Guiana
French Guiana
in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
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John Of Scotland
John Balliol[1] (c. 1249 – late 1314), known derisively as Toom Tabard (meaning "empty coat") was King of Scots
King of Scots
from 1292 to 1296. Little is known of his early life. After the death of Margaret, Maid of Norway, Scotland
Scotland
entered an interregnum during which several competitors for the Crown of Scotland
Scotland
put forward claims. Balliol was chosen from among them as the new King of Scotland
Scotland
by a group of selected noblemen headed by King Edward I of England. Edward used his influence over the process to subjugate Scotland
Scotland
and undermined Balliol's personal reign by treating Scotland
Scotland
as a vassal of England. Edward's influence in Scottish affairs tainted Balliol's reign and the Scottish nobility deposed him and appointed a council of twelve to rule instead
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Edward I Of England
Edward
Edward
I (17/18 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), also known as Edward Longshanks and the Hammer of the Scots (Latin: Malleus Scotorum), was King of England
King of England
from 1272 to 1307. Before his accession to the throne, he was commonly referred to as The Lord Edward.[1] He spent much of his reign reforming royal administration and common law. Through an extensive legal inquiry, Edward
Edward
investigated the tenure of various feudal liberties, while the law was reformed through a series of statutes regulating criminal and property law. Increasingly, however, Edward's attention was drawn towards military affairs. As the first son of Henry III, Edward
Edward
was involved early in the political intrigues of his father's reign, which included an outright rebellion by the English barons. In 1259, he briefly sided with a baronial reform movement, supporting the Provisions of Oxford
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Pope Nicholas IV
Pope
Pope
Nicholas IV (Latin: Nicolaus IV; 30 September 1227 – 4 April 1292), born Girolamo Masci, Pope
Pope
from 22 February 1288 to his death in 1292. He was the first Franciscan
Franciscan
to be elected pope.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Pontificate2.1 Papal conclave 2.2 New Cardinals 2.3 Actions3 Death 4 Taxatio 5 References 6 BibliographyEarly life[edit] Jerome
Jerome
Masci (Girolamo Masci) was born on 30 September 1227 at Lisciano, near Ascoli Piceno.[2][3] He was a pious, peace-loving man whose goals as a Franciscan
Franciscan
friar were to protect the Church, promote the crusades, and root out heresy
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Diocese Of Dunkeld
Coordinates: 56°33′54″N 3°35′06″W / 56.565°N 3.585°W / 56.565; -3.585 Diocese
Diocese
of DunkeldHead Bishop of DunkeldArchdeacon(s) Archdeacon of DunkeldKnown rural deans Angus (Rattray); Atholl; Drumalban; Fife
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Canon (priest)
A canon (from the Latin
Latin
canonicus, itself derived from the Greek κανονικός, kanonikós, "relating to a rule", "regular") is a member of certain bodies subject to an ecclesiastical rule. Originally, a canon was a cleric living with others in a clergy house or, later, in one of the houses within the precinct of or close to a cathedral and conducting his life according to the orders or rules of the church. This way of life grew common (and is first documented) in the eighth century. In the eleventh century, some churches required clergy thus living together to adopt the rule first proposed by Saint Augustine that they renounce private wealth
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Bishop Of Aberdeen
The Bishop
Bishop
of Aberdeen
Aberdeen
(originally Bishop
Bishop
of Mortlach, in Latin Murthlacum) was the ecclesiastical head of the Diocese of Aberdeen, one of Scotland's 13 medieval bishoprics, whose first recorded bishop is an early 12th-century cleric named Nechtan. It appears that the episcopal seat had previously been at Mortlach (Mòrthlach), but was moved to Aberdeen
Aberdeen
during the reign of King David I of Scotland. The names of three bishops of Mortlach are known, the latter two of whom, "Donercius" and "Cormauch" (Cormac), by name only. The Bishop
Bishop
of Aberdeen
Aberdeen
broke communion with the Roman Catholic Church
Roman Catholic Church
after the Scottish Reformation. Following the Glorious Revolution, the office was abolished in the Church of Scotland, but continued in the Scottish Episcopal Church
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Andrew Umfray
Andrew Umfray was a 14th-century bishop-elect of Dunkeld. He had been the precentor of Dunkeld
Dunkeld
when, following the death of Bishop Michael de Monymusk, Andrew was elected as the new bishop. He travelled to the Apostolic See
Apostolic See
to receive consecration, and was provided to the see of Dunkeld
Dunkeld
on 17 June 1377 by Pope Gregory XI. He died at the papal court, probably before receiving consecration. References[edit]Dowden, John, The Bishops of Scotland, ed. J
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Richard De Pilmuir
Richard de Pilmuir [Pilmor, Pylmore] (died 1347) was a 14th-century bishop of Dunkeld. He was a brother of John de Pilmor, bishop of Moray. He was precentor of the bishopric of Moray
Moray
when, following the death of bishop William Sinclair, the canons of Dunkeld held an election. This happened in the year 1337. The result was disputed. Richard's election was challenged by Maol Choluim de Innerpeffray. The dispute was taken to the papal court. Pope Benedict XII
Pope Benedict XII
passed the question on to Cardinal Bertrand du Pouget, bishop of Ostia, for judgment. In July 1344 the cardinal declared the election of both null and void, but appointed Richard to the bishopric. Richard, as bishop of Dunkeld, maintained connections with Moray. On 20 October 1345 he is found along with his brother at Elgin Cathedral
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