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Matrixx Initiatives, Inc. V. Siracusano
Matrixx Initiatives, Inc. v. Siracusano, 563 U.S. 27 (2011) is a decision by the Supreme Court of the United States
Supreme Court of the United States
regarding whether a plaintiff can state a claim for securities fraud under §10(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, 15 U.S.C. §78j(b), and Securities and Exchange Commission
Securities and Exchange Commission
Rule 10b-5, 17 CFR §240.10b-5 (2010), based on a pharmaceutical company's failure to disclose reports of adverse events associated with a product if the reports do not find statistically significant evidence that the adverse effects may be caused by the use of the product
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Supreme Court Of The United States
The Supreme Court of the United States
United States
(sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[2]) is the highest federal court of the United States. Established pursuant to Article Three of the United States Constitution in 1789, it has ultimate (and largely discretionary) appellate jurisdiction over all federal courts and state court cases involving issues of federal law plus original jurisdiction over a small range of cases. In the legal system of the United States, the Supreme Court is generally the final interpreter of federal law including the United States
United States
Constitution, but it may act only within the context of a case in which it has jurisdiction
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Without Prejudice
Prejudice is a legal term with different meanings when used in criminal, civil or common law. Often the use of prejudice in legal context differs from the more common use of the word and thus has specific technical meanings implied by its use. Two of the more common applications of the word are as part of the terms "with prejudice" and "without prejudice". In general, an action taken with prejudice is essentially final; in particular, "dismissal with prejudice" would forbid a party from refiling the case, and might occur either because of misconduct on the part of the party who filed the claim or criminal complaint or could be the result of an out of court agreement or settlement
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Statistical Significance
In statistical hypothesis testing,[1][2] a result has statistical significance when it is very unlikely to have occurred given the null hypothesis.[3] More precisely, a study's defined significance level, α, is the probability of the study rejecting the null hypothesis, given that it were true;[4] and the p-value of a result, p, is the probability of obtaining a result at least as extreme, given that the null hypothesis were true
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Court Of Appeals For The Ninth Circuit
The United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit
United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit
(in case citations, 9th Cir.) is a U.S. Federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the district courts in the following districts:District of Alaska District of Arizona Central District of California Eastern District of California Northern District of California Southern District of California District of Hawaii District of Idaho District of Montana District of Nevada District of Oregon Eastern District of Washington Western District of WashingtonIt also has appellate jurisdiction over the following territorial courts:District of Guam District of the Northern Mariana IslandsHeadquartered in San Francisco, California, the Ninth Circuit is by far the largest of the thirteen courts of appeals, with 29 active judgeships
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National Electrical Contractors Association
The National Electrical Contractors Association
National Electrical Contractors Association
(NECA) is a trade association in the United States that represents the $130 billion/year electrical contracting industry. NECA supports the businesses that bring power, light, and communication technology to buildings and communities. Through advocacy, education, research, and standards development, NECA works to advance the electrical contracting industry.Contents1 History 2 Organization 3 NECA members 4 NECA programs and services4.1 Advocacy 4.2 Research 4.3 Industry information5 External linksHistory[edit] After the invention of the electric light, a new industry sprang up to install electricity in homes and businesses
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International Brotherhood Of Electrical Workers
The International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers
International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers
(IBEW) is a labor union that represents nearly 750,000 workers and retirees[1] in the electrical industry in the United States, Canada,[3] Panama,[4] Guam,[5][6] and several Caribbean
Caribbean
island nations; particularly electricians, or inside wiremen, in the construction industry and linemen and other employees of public utilities
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Zinc Gluconate
Zinc
Zinc
gluconate is the zinc salt of gluconic acid. It is an ionic compound consisting of two anions of gluconate for each zinc(II) cation. Zinc
Zinc
gluconate is a popular form for the delivery of zinc as a dietary supplement, or the name zincum gluconicum is used when the product is described as homeopathic. Gluconic acid
Gluconic acid
is found naturally, and is industrially made by the fermentation of glucose, typically by Aspergillus niger, but also by other fungi, e.g. Penicillium, or by bacteria, e.g. Acetobacter, Pseudomonas
Pseudomonas
and Gluconobacter.[1] In its pure form, it is a white to off-white powder. It can also be made by electrolytic oxidation,[2] although this is a more expensive process
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Anosmia
Anosmia
Anosmia
is the inability to perceive odor or a lack of functioning olfaction—the loss of the sense of smell. Anosmia
Anosmia
may be temporary, but some forms such as from an accident, can be permanent. Anosmia
Anosmia
is due to a number of factors, including an inflammation of the nasal mucosa, blockage of nasal passages or a destruction of one temporal lobe
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Scienter
Scienter is a legal term that refers to intent or knowledge of wrongdoing. An offending party then has knowledge of the "wrongness" of an act or event prior to committing it. For example, if a man sells a car with brakes that do not work to his friend, but the seller does not know about the brake problem, the seller then has no scienter. If he sells the car and knew of the problem before he sold the car, he has scienter. The word has the same root as science, the Latin
Latin
scienter (knowingly), from scire (to know, to separate one thing from another).Contents1 Scienter action in tort law 2 General use 3 In contract law 4 Element of claim of securities fraud 5 See also 6 References 7 External links Scienter action in tort law[edit] The scienter action is a category within tort law in some common law jurisdictions that deals with the damage done by an animal directly to a human
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United States Reports
The United States Reports
United States Reports
are the official record (law reports) of the rulings, orders, case tables (list of every case decided, in alphabetical order both by the name of the petitioner (the losing party in lower courts) and by the name of the respondent (the prevailing party below)), and other proceedings of the Supreme Court of the United States. United States Reports
United States Reports
are printed and bound and are the final version of court opinions and cannot be changed. Opinions of the court in each case, prepended with a headnote prepared by the Reporter of Decisions, and any concurring or dissenting opinions are published sequentially
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Writ Of Certiorari
Certiorari,[a] often abbreviated cert. in the United States, is a process for seeking judicial review and a writ issued by a court that agrees to review. A certiorari is issued by a superior court, directing an inferior court, tribunal, or other public authority to send the record of a proceeding for review.Contents1 Etymology 2 Historical and modern jurisdictions2.1 Ancient Rome 2.2 Common law
Common law
and Commonwealth 2.3 United States2.3.1 Federal courts 2.3.2 State courts 2.3.3 Administrative law2.4 Philippines3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 Further readingEtymology[edit] The term comes from the words used at the beginning of these writs when they were written in Latin: certiorārī (volumus) "(we wish) to be informed"
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Carl Bialik
Carl Bialik is an American journalist, who on February 6, 2017, was named Data Science Editor of Yelp, working on Yelpblog.[1][2] Prior to this, Bialik was known for his work for The Wall Street Journal's web site, and the paper itself. He is also a co-founder of the growing online-only Gelf Magazine.[3] In late 2013, Bialik was hired by Nate Silver at FiveThirtyEight.com.[4] Career[edit] At WSJ.com, Bialik was the creator and writer of the weekly Numbers Guy[5] column, about the use and (particularly) misuse of numbers and statistics in the news and advocacy
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Wall Street Journal
The Wall Street
Wall Street
Journal is an American business-focused, English-language international daily newspaper based in New York City. The Journal, along with its Asian and European editions, is published six days a week by Dow Jones & Company, a division of News Corp. The newspaper is published in the broadsheet format and online. The Wall Street
Wall Street
Journal is the largest newspaper in the United States by circulation. According to News Corp, in their June 2017 10-K Filing with the SEC, the Journal had a circulation of about 2.277 million copies (including nearly 1,270,000 digital subscriptions) as of June 2017[update],[2] compared with USA Today's 1.7 million. The newspaper has won 40 Pulitzer Prizes through 2017[3] and derives its name from Wall Street
Wall Street
in the heart of the Financial District of Lower Manhattan
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Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Of Public Health
The Johns Hopkins
Johns Hopkins
Bloomberg School of Public Health
Bloomberg School of Public Health
(JHSPH) is part of Johns Hopkins University
Johns Hopkins University
in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. As the first independent, degree-granting institution for research in epidemiology and training in public health,[4] and the largest public health training facility in the United States,[5][6][7][8] the Bloomberg School is a leading international authority on the improvement of health and prevention of disease and disability. The school's mission is to protect populations from illness and injury by pioneering new research, deploying its knowledge and expertise in the field, and training scientists and practitioners in the global defense of human life.[2] The school is ranked first in public health in the U.S. News and World Report
U.S

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Morrison & Foerster
Morrison & Foerster LLP, is an international law firm with 16 offices located throughout the United States, Asia, and Europe
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