HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Match Of The Day
Match of the Day
Match of the Day
is the BBC's principal football programme
[...More...]

"Match Of The Day" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
[...More...]

"United Kingdom" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

SDTV
Standard-definition television
Standard-definition television
(SDTV or SD) is a television system which uses a resolution that's not considered to be either high-definition television (720p, 1080i, 1080p, 1440p, 4K UHDTV, and 8K UHD) or enhanced-definition television (EDTV 480p). The two common SDTV signal types are 576i, with 576 interlaced lines of resolution, derived from the European-developed PAL
PAL
and SECAM
SECAM
systems; and 480i based on the American National Television System Committee NTSC system
[...More...]

"SDTV" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

BBC
The British Broadcasting
Broadcasting
Corporation (BBC) is a British public service broadcaster. Its headquarters are at Broadcasting House
Broadcasting House
in Westminster, London
London
and it is the world's oldest national broadcasting organisation[3] and the largest broadcaster in the world by number of employees
[...More...]

"BBC" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

BBC Two
BBC
BBC
Two is the second flagship television channel of the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) in the United Kingdom, Isle of Man
Isle of Man
and Channel Islands. It covers a wide range of subject matter, but tending towards more "highbrow" programmes than the more mainstream and popular BBC
BBC
One. Like the BBC's other domestic TV and radio channels, it is funded by the television licence, and is therefore free of commercial advertising. It is a comparatively well-funded public-service network, regularly attaining a much higher audience share than most public-service networks worldwide. Originally styled BBC2, it was the third British television station to be launched (starting on 21 April 1964), and from 1 July 1967, Europe's first television channel to broadcast regularly in colour
[...More...]

"BBC Two" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

1080i
1080i
1080i
(also known as Full HD or BT.709) is an abbreviation referring to a combination of frame resolution and scan type, used in high-definition television (HDTV) and high-definition video. The number "1080" refers to the number of horizontal lines on the screen. The "i" is an abbreviation for "interlaced"; this indicates that only the odd lines, then the even lines of each frame (each image called a video field) are drawn alternately, so that only half the number of actual image frames are used to produce video. A related display resolution is 1080p, which also has 1080 lines of resolution; the "p" refers to progressive scan, which indicates that the lines of resolution for each frame are "drawn" in on the screen sequence. The term assumes a widescreen aspect ratio of 16:9 (a rectangular TV that is wider than it is tall), so the 1080 lines of vertical resolution implies 1920 columns of horizontal resolution, or 1920 pixels × 1080 lines
[...More...]

"1080i" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

HDTV
High-definition television (HDTV) is a television system providing an image resolution that is of substantially higher resolution than that of standard-definition television
[...More...]

"HDTV" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Frank Lampard
Frank James Lampard OBE (born 20 June 1978) is an English former professional footballer and children's writer.[4] He is the all-time leading goalscorer for Chelsea, where he played for 13 years,[5] and is considered by a number of journalists and football experts to be one of the greatest midfielders of his generation,[6][7][8] in addition to being regarded as Chelsea's greatest ever player by some Chelsea players, such as previous record goal-scorer Bobby Tambling and long-term teammate John Terry.[9][10] Lampard began his career at West Ham United, for whom his father Frank Lampard Sr. had also played. He secured a place in the first team by the 1997–98 season, and the following year helped the team finish fifth in the Premier League, their highest-ever Premier League placing. In 2001, he moved to rival London
London
club Chelsea for £11 million. In 2014, he was released by Chelsea after 13 years of service
[...More...]

"Frank Lampard" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

English Language
English is a West Germanic language
West Germanic language
that was first spoken in early medieval England
England
and is now a global lingua franca.[4][5] Named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to England, it ultimately derives its name from the Anglia (Angeln) peninsula in the Baltic Sea. It is closely related to the Frisian languages, but its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse (a North Germanic
North Germanic
language), as well as by Latin
Latin
and Romance languages, especially French.[6] English has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years. The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the 5th century, are called Old English
[...More...]

"English Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

576i
576i
576i
is a standard-definition video mode originally used for broadcast television in most countries of the world where the utility frequency for electric power distribution is 50 Hz. Because of its close association with the color encoding system, it is often referred to as simply PAL, PAL/ SECAM
SECAM
or SECAM
SECAM
when compared to its 60 Hz (typically, see PAL-M) NTSC-color-encoded counterpart, 480i. In digital applications it is usually referred to as "576i"; in analogue contexts it is often called "625 lines",[1] and the aspect ratio is usually 4:3 in analogue transmission and 16:9 in digital transmission. The 576 identifies a vertical resolution of 576 lines, and the i identifies it as an interlaced resolution
[...More...]

"576i" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Guinness World Records
Guinness
Guinness
World Records, known from its inception in 1955 until 2000 as The Guinness
Guinness
Book of Records and in previous United States
United States
editions as The Guinness
Guinness
Book of World Records, is a reference book published annually, listing world records both of human achievements and the extremes of the natural world. The brainchild of Sir Hugh Beaver, the book was co-founded by brothers Norris and Ross McWhirter in Fleet Street, London in August 1954. The book itself holds a world record, as the best-selling copyrighted book of all time. As of the 2017 edition, it is now in its 62nd year of publication, published in 100 countries and 23 languages. The international franchise has extended beyond print to include television series and museums
[...More...]

"Guinness World Records" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

David Coleman
David Robert Coleman OBE (26 April 1926 – 21 December 2013) was a British sports commentator and TV presenter who worked for the BBC
BBC
for 46 years. He covered eleven Summer Olympic Games
Summer Olympic Games
from 1960 to 2000 and six football World Cups.[1] Coleman presented some of the BBC's leading sporting programmes, including Grandstand and Sportsnight, and was the host of A Question of Sport for 18 years. He retired from the BBC
BBC
in 2000. Later that year he became the first broadcaster to receive the Olympic Order award, in recognition of his contribution to the Olympic movement.[2]Contents1 Early life 2 BBC2.1 Grandstand 2.2 Football 2.3 Athletics 2.4 Other3 Recognition 4 Retirement 5 Death 6 Personal life 7 Folklore 8 References 9 External linksEarly life[edit] Born in Alderley Edge, Cheshire, of Irish heritage (his immediate family hailed from County Cork), Coleman was a keen amateur runner
[...More...]

"David Coleman" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Television Program
A television show is a series of related productions intended for broadcast on over-the-air, cable television or Internet television, other than a commercial, trailer or any other segment of content not serving as attraction for viewership. More rarely, it may be a single production, also called a television program (British English: programme). A limited number of episodes of a television show may be called a miniseries or a serial or limited series. A television series is without a fixed length and are usually divided into seasons (U.S. and Canada) or series (UK), yearly or semiannual sets of new episodes. While there is no defined length, U.S. industry practice has traditionally favored longer television seasons than those of other countries. A one-time broadcast may be called a "special" or particularly in the UK a "special episode"
[...More...]

"Television Program" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

The Championships, Wimbledon
The Championships, Wimbledon, commonly known simply as Wimbledon, is the oldest tennis tournament in the world, and is widely regarded as the most prestigious.[2][3][4][5][6] It has been held at the All England Club in Wimbledon, London, since 1877 and is played on outdoor grass courts. Wimbledon is one of the four Grand Slam tennis tournaments, the others being the Australian Open, the French Open
French Open
and the US Open. Since the Australian Open
Australian Open
shifted to hardcourt in 1988, Wimbledon is the only major still played on grass. The tournament traditionally took place over two weeks in late June and early July, starting on the third Monday in June[7] and culminating with the Ladies' and Gentlemen's Singles Finals, scheduled for the Saturday and Sunday at the end of the second week
[...More...]

"The Championships, Wimbledon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tennis
Tennis
Tennis
is a racket sport that can be played individually against a single opponent (singles) or between two teams of two players each (doubles). Each player uses a tennis racket that is strung with cord to strike a hollow rubber ball covered with felt over or around a net and into the opponent's court. The object of the game is to play the ball in such a way that the opponent is not able to play a valid return. The player who is unable to return the ball will not gain a point, while the opposite player will. Tennis
Tennis
is an Olympic sport and is played at all levels of society and at all ages. The sport can be played by anyone who can hold a racket, including wheelchair users. The modern game of tennis originated in Birmingham, England, in the late 19th century as lawn tennis.[1] It had close connections both to various field (lawn) games such as croquet and bowls as well as to the older racket sport today called real tennis
[...More...]

"Tennis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Association Football
Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer,[a] is a team sport played between two teams of eleven players with a spherical ball. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport.[3][4][5][6] The game is played on a rectangular field with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal. Players are not allowed to touch the ball with outstretched hands or arms while it is in play, unless they are goalkeepers within their penalty area. Other players mainly use their feet to strike or pass the ball, but may also use any other part of their body except the hands and the arms. The team that scores the most goals by the end of the match wins. If the score is level at the end of the game, either a draw is declared or the game goes into extra time or a penalty shootout depending on the format of the competition
[...More...]

"Association Football" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.