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Matane
Matane
Matane
is a town on the Gaspé Peninsula
Gaspé Peninsula
in Quebec, Canada, on the south shore of the Saint Lawrence River
Saint Lawrence River
at the mouth of the Matane River
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Saint Lawrence River
The Saint Lawrence River
River
(French: Fleuve Saint-Laurent; Tuscarora: Kahnawáʼkye;[3] Mohawk: Kaniatarowanenneh, meaning "big waterway") is a large river in the middle latitudes of North America. The Saint Lawrence River
River
flows in a roughly north-easterly direction, connecting the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
with the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
and forming the primary drainage outflow of the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
Basin. It traverses the Canadian provinces of Quebec
Quebec
and Ontario, and is part of the international boundary between Ontario, Canada, and the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New York
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Shrimp
The term shrimp is used to refer to some decapod crustaceans, although the exact animals covered can vary. Used broadly, it may cover any of the groups with elongated bodies and a primarily swimming mode of locomotion – most commonly Caridea
Caridea
and Dendrobranchiata. In some fields, however, the term is used more narrowly, and may be restricted to Caridea, to smaller species of either group, or to only the marine species. Under the broader definition, shrimp may be synonymous with prawn, covering stalk-eyed swimming crustaceans with long narrow muscular tails (abdomens), long whiskers (antennae), and slender legs.[1] Any small crustacean which resembles a shrimp tends to be called one.[2] They swim forward by paddling with swimmerets on the underside of their abdomens, although their escape response is typically repeated flicks with the tail driving them backwards very quickly
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Canadian Postal Code
A Canadian postal code is a six-character string that forms part of a postal address in Canada.[1] Like British, Irish and Dutch postcodes, Canada's postal codes are alphanumeric. They are in the format A1A 1A1, where A is a letter and 1 is a digit, with a space separating the third and fourth characters. As of September 2014, there were 855,815 postal codes[2] using Forward Sortation Areas from A0A in Newfoundland to Y1A in Yukon. Canada
Canada
Post provides a free postal code look-up tool on its website,[3] via its mobile application,[4] and sells hard-copy directories and CD-ROMs
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Telephone Numbering Plan
A telephone numbering plan is a type of numbering scheme used in telecommunication to assign telephone numbers to subscriber telephones or other telephony endpoints.[1] Telephone numbers are the addresses of participants in a telephone network, reachable by a system of destination code routing. Telephone numbering plans are defined in each of administrative regions of the public switched telephone network (PSTN) and they are also present in private telephone networks. For public number systems, geographic location plays a role in the sequence of numbers assigned to each telephone subscriber. Numbering plans may follow a variety of design strategies which have often arisen from the historical evolution of individual telephone networks and local requirements. A broad division is commonly recognized, distinguishing open numbering plans and closed numbering plans[discuss]
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Yves Racine
Racine may refer to:Contents1 Places1.1 United States 1.2 Other2 People 3 Music 4 Medicine 5 Transport 6 See alsoPlaces[edit] United States[edit]Racine, Minnesota Racine, Missouri Racine, Ohio Racine, West Virginia Racine, Wisconsin, the largest city named Racine in the United States Racine County, WisconsinOther[edit]
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Geocode
Geocoding is the computational process of transforming a postal address description to a location on the Earth's surface (spatial representation in numerical coordinates). Reverse geocoding, on the other hand, converts geographic coordinates to a description of a location, usually the name of a place or an addressable location. Geocoding relies on a computer representation of address points, the street / road network, together with postal and administrative boundaries. Geocoding (verb): The act of transforming an address text into a valid spatial representation. Geocoder (noun): A piece of software or a (web) service that implements a geocoding process i.e
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NHL
The National Hockey League
National Hockey League
(NHL; French: Ligue nationale de hockey—LNH) is a professional ice hockey league in North America, currently comprising 31 teams: 24 in the United States and 7 in Canada. The NHL is considered to be the premier professional ice hockey league in the world,[3] and one of the major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada
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UTC−5
UTC−05:00 is a time offset that subtracts five hours from Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC). In North America, it is observed in the Eastern Time Zone
Eastern Time Zone
during standard time, and in the Central Time Zone during the other eight months (see Daylight saving time)
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Ferry
A ferry is a merchant vessel used to carry passengers, and sometimes vehicles and cargo as well, across a body of water. Most ferries operate regular return services. A passenger ferry with many stops, such as in Venice, Italy, is sometimes called a water bus or water taxi. Ferries form a part of the public transport systems of many waterside cities and islands, allowing direct transit between points at a capital cost much lower than bridges or tunnels
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Samuel De Champlain
Samuel
Samuel
de Champlain (French: [samɥɛl də ʃɑ̃plɛ̃] born Samuel
Samuel
Champlain; on or before August 13, 1574[2][Note 2][Note 1] – December 25, 1635), "The Father of New France", was a French navigator, cartographer, draftsman, soldier, explorer, geographer, ethnologist, diplomat, and chronicler. He made from 21-29 trips across the Atlantic[3], and founded New France
New France
and Quebec City
Quebec City
on July 3, 1608
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Mi'kmaq Language
The Mi'kmaq
Mi'kmaq
language (spelled and pronounced Micmac historically and now often Migmaw or Mikmaw in English, and Míkmaq, Míkmaw or Mìgmao in Mi'kmaq) is an Eastern Algonquian language spoken by nearly 11,000 Mi'kmaq
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Malecite-Passamaquoddy Language
Malecite–Passamaquoddy (also known as Maliseet–Passamaquoddy) is an endangered Algonquian language spoken by the Maliseet and Passamaquoddy peoples along both sides of the border between Maine
Maine
in the United States
United States
and New Brunswick, Canada. The language consists of two major dialects: Malecite, which is mainly spoken in the Saint John River Valley in New Brunswick; and Passamaquoddy, spoken mostly in the St. Croix River Valley of eastern Maine. However, the two dialects differ only slightly, mainly in accent. Malecite-Passamaquoddy was widely spoken by the indigenous people in these areas until around the post- World War II
World War II
era, when changes in the education system and increased marriage outside of the speech community caused a large decrease in the number of children who learned or regularly used the language.[3] As a result, in both Canada
Canada
and the U.S
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La Rochelle
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. La Rochelle
La Rochelle
(French pronunciation: ​[la ʁɔ.ʃɛl]) is a city in western France
France
and a seaport on the Bay of Biscay, a part of the Atlantic Ocean. It is the capital of the Charente-Maritime
Charente-Maritime
department. The city is connected to the Île de Ré
Île de Ré
by a 2.9-kilometre (1.8-mile) bridge completed on 19 May 1988
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