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Martin Hoffman
Martin L. Hoffman is an American psychologist, a professor emeritus of clinical and developmental psychology at New York University.[1] His work largely has to do with the development of empathy, and its relationship with moral development.[2] His research also touches on areas such as empathic anger, sympathy, guilt and feelings of injustice.[1] Hoffman did his undergraduate studies at Purdue University, receiving a B.S. in electrical engineering in 1945
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Purdue University
Purdue University
Purdue University
is a public research university located in West Lafayette, Indiana
Indiana
and is the flagship campus of the Purdue University system.[5] The university was founded in 1869 after Lafayette businessman John Purdue
John Purdue
donated land and money to establish a college of science, technology, and agriculture in his name.[6] The first classes were held on September 16, 1874, with six instructors and 39 students.[6] The main campus in West Lafayette offers more than 200 majors for undergraduates, over 69 masters and doctoral programs, and professional degrees in pharmacy and veterinary medicine. In addition, Purdue has 18 intercollegiate sports teams and more than 900 student organizations
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Psychologist
A psychologist studies normal and abnormal mental states from cognitive, emotional, and social processes and behavior by observing, interpreting, and recording how individuals relate to one another and to their environments.[1] To become a psychologist, a person often completes a graduate university degree in psychology, but in most jurisdictions, members of other behavioral professions (such as counselors and psychiatrists) can also evaluate, diagnose, treat, and study mental processes.[2]Contents1 Professional practice1.1 Clinical psychologists 1.2 Contrasted with psychiatrists2 Licensing and regulations2.1 Australia 2.2 Belgium 2.3 Finland 2.4 Germany 2.5 Greece 2.6 The Netherlands 2.7 New Zealand 2.8 South Africa 2.9 Sweden 2.10 United Kingdom2.10.1 Employment2.11 United States and Canada2.11.1 Regulation 2.11.2 Schooling 2.11.3 Licensure 2.11.4 Employment3 See also 4 References 5 External linksProfessional pract
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American Psychological Society
1800 Massachusetts Ave. NW Suite 402 Washington, D.C., United StatesMembership33,000PresidentSuparna RajaramWebsite www.psychologicalscience.orgThe Association for Psychological Science (APS), previously the American Psychological Society, is an international non-profit organization whose mission is to promote, protect, and advance the interests of scientifically oriented psychology in research, application, teaching, and the improvement of human welfare
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American Psychological Association
The American Psychological Association
American Psychological Association
(APA) is the largest scientific and professional organization of psychologists in the United States,[2] with around 117,500 members including scientists, educators, clinicians, consultants, and students.[2] The APA has an annual budget of around $115m.[3] There are 54 divisions of the APA—interest groups covering different subspecialties of psychology or topical areas.[4]Contents1 Profile1.1 Governance 1.2 Good Gover
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American Association For The Advancement Of Science
The American Association for the Advancement of Science
American Association for the Advancement of Science
(AAAS) is an American international non-profit organization with the stated goals of promoting cooperation among scientists, defending scientific freedom, encouraging scientific responsibility, and supporting scientific education and science outreach for the betterment of all humanity.[1] It is the world's largest general scientific society, with ov
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Fellow
A fellow is a member of a group (or fellowship) that work together in pursuing mutual knowledge or practice.[1] There are many different kinds of fellowships which are awarded for different reasons in academia and industry, often indicating an advanced level of scholarship.Contents1 Education and academia1.1 Research fellowships 1.2 Teaching fellowships 1.3 Fellowships as a prize or honor 1.4 Ancient university fellowships 1.5 Medical fellowships2 Industry and corporate fellowships2.1 Fellowships in commercial organizations 2.2 Nonprofit and government fellowships3 ReferencesEducation and academia[edit] In education and academia there are several kinds of fellowships, awarded for different reasons: Research fellowships[edit] Main article: Research fellow The title of research fellow is used to denote an academic research position at a university or a similar institution and is roughly equivalent to the title of lecturer in the teaching c
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Academic Journal
An academic or scholarly journal is a periodical publication in which scholarship relating to a particular academic discipline is published. Academic
Academic
journals serve as permanent and transparent forums for the presentation, scrutiny and discussion of research. They are usually peer-reviewed or refereed.[1] Content typically takes the form of articles presenting original research, review articles, and book reviews. The purpose of an academic journal, according to the first editor of the world's oldest academic journal Henry Oldenburg, is to give researchers a venue to "impart their knowledge to one another, and contribute what they can to the Grand design of improving natural knowledge, and perfecting all Philosophical Arts, and Sciences."[2] The term academic journal applies to scholarly publications in all fields; this article discusses the aspects common to all academic field journals
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PhD
A Doctor of Philosophy
Philosophy
(PhD, Ph.D., DPhil, or Dr. phil.; Latin Philosophiae doctor) is the highest academic degree awarded by universities in most countries. PhDs are awarded for programs across the whole breadth of academic fields. The completion of a PhD is often a requirement for employment as a university professor, researcher, or scientist in many fields. Individuals who have earned a Doctor of Philosophy
Philosophy
degree may, in most jurisdictions, use the title Doctor (often abbreviated "Dr") or, in non-English speaking countries, variants such as "Dr. phil." with their name, and may use post-nominal letters such as "Ph.D.", "PhD" (depending on the awarding institute). The requirements to earn a PhD degree vary considerably according to the country, institution, and time period, from entry-level research degrees to higher doctorates
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University Of Michigan
The University of Michigan
Michigan
(UM, U-M, U of M, or UMich), often simply referred to as Michigan, is a public research university in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The University of Michigan
Michigan
is the state's oldest university, founded in 1817 in Detroit, Michigan
Michigan
as the Catholepistemiad, or University of Michigania, 20 years before the Michigan
Michigan
Territory became a state. It moved to Ann Arbor in 1837 onto 40 acres (16 ha) of what is now known as Central Campus. Since its establishment in Ann Arbor, the university campus has expanded to include more than 584 major buildings with a combined area of more than 34 million gross square feet (780 acres; 3.2 km2) spread out over a Central Campus and North Campus, two regional campuses in Flint and Dearborn, and a Center in Detroit
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Master's Degree
A master's degree[fn 1] (from Latin
Latin
magister) is usually a second-cycle academic degree awarded by universities or colleges upon completion of a course of study demonstrating mastery or a high-order overview of a specific field of study or area of professional practice.[1] A master's degree normally requires previous study at the bachelor's level, either as a separate degree or as part of an integrated course
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Electrical Engineering
Electrical engineering
Electrical engineering
is a professional engineering discipline that generally deals with the study and application of electricity, electronics, and electromagnetism. This field first became an identifiable occupation in the later half of the 19th century after commercialization of the electric telegraph, the telephone, and electric power distribution and use. Subsequently, broadcasting and recording media made electronics part of daily life. The invention of the transistor, and later the integrated circuit, brought down the cost of electronics to the point they can be used in almost any household object. Electrical engineering
Electrical engineering
has now subdivided into a wide range of subfields including electronics, digital computers, computer engineering, power engineering, telecommunications, control systems, robotics, radio-frequency engineering, signal processing, instrumentation, and microelectronics
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Injustice
Injustice
Injustice
is a quality relating to unfairness or undeserved outcomes. The term may be applied in reference to a particular event or situation, or to a larger status quo
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Guilt (emotion)
Guilt is a cognitive or an emotional experience that occurs when a person believes or realizes—accurately or not—that he or she has compromised his or her own standards of conduct or has violated a universal moral standard and bears significant responsibility for that violation.[1] Guilt is closely related to the concept of remorse.Contents1 Psychology1.1 Defenses 1.2 Behavioral responses 1.3 Lack of guilt in psychopaths 1.4 Causes1.4.1 Evolutionary theories 1.4.2 Social psychology theories 1.4.3 Other theories2 Collective guilt 3 Cultural views3.1 Etymology 3.2 In literature 3.3 In the Christian Bible4 See also 5 Further reading 6 References 7 External linksPsychology[edit] Guilt is an important factor in perpetuating obsessive–compulsive disorder symptoms.[2] Guilt and its associated causes, merits, and demerits are common themes in psychology and psychiatry
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Sympathy
Sympathy
Sympathy
(from the Greek words syn "together" and pathos "feeling" which means "fellow-feeling") is the perception, understanding, and reaction to the distress or need of another life form.[1] This empathic concern is driven by a switch in viewpoint, from a personal perspective to the perspective of another group or individual who is in need.Contents1 Etymology 2 Causes 3 Evolutionary origins 4 Communication 5 Human behavior 6 Healthcare 7 Neuroscience perspectives 8 Child development8.1 Theory of mind 8.2 Innate feature9 See also 10 References 11 Further reading 12 External linksE
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