HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Marston Moor
Parliamentarians Covenanters RoyalistsCommanders and leaders Earl of Leven Sir David Leslie William Baillie Earl of Manchester Lord Fairfax Oliver Cromwell Sir Thomas Fairfax Prince Rupert Marquess of Newcastle Lord Byron Lord Goring Charles Lucas
Charles Lucas
  Lord EythinStrength24,500: Covenanters: 2,000 horse 11,000 foot 500 dragoons 50 guns Parliamentarians: 5,000 horse 6,000 foot17,500: Rupert's army: 6,000 horse 8,000 foot 500 dragoons 14 guns
[...More...]

"Marston Moor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Surrender (military)
Surrender, in military terms, is the relinquishment of control over territory, combatants, fortifications, ships or armament to another power. A surrender may be accomplished peacefully, without fighting, or it may be the result of defeat in battle. A sovereign state may surrender following defeat in a war, usually by signing a peace treaty or capitulation agreement
[...More...]

"Surrender (military)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roundhead
Roundheads were supporters of the Parliament of England
Parliament of England
during the English Civil War. Also known as Parliamentarians, they fought against Charles I of England
Charles I of England
and his supporters, the Cavaliers or Royalists, who claimed rule by absolute monarchy and the divine right of kings.[1] The goal of the Roundhead
Roundhead
party was to give the Parliament supreme control over executive administration.[2]Contents1 Beliefs 2 Origins and background 3 Notes 4 ReferencesBeliefs[edit] Most Roundheads sought constitutional monarchy in place of the absolutist monarchy sought by Charles I
[...More...]

"Roundhead" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Covenanter
The Covenanters were a Scottish Presbyterian
Presbyterian
movement that played an important part in the history of Scotland, and to a lesser extent that of England and Ireland, during the 17th century. Presbyterian denominations tracing their history to the Covenanters and often incorporating the name continue the ideas and traditions in Scotland and internationally. They derived their name from the word covenant meaning a band, legal document or agreement, with particular reference to the Covenant between God and the Israelites in the Old Testament
[...More...]

"Covenanter" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cavalier
The term Cavalier
Cavalier
(/ˌkævəˈlɪər/) was first used by Roundheads as a term of abuse for the wealthier Royalist supporters of King Charles I and his son Charles II of England
Charles II of England
during the English Civil War, the Interregnum, and the Restoration (1642 – c. 1679). It was later adopted by the Royalists themselves. Although it referred originally to political and social attitudes and behaviour, of which clothing was a very small part, it has subsequently become strongly identified with the fashionable clothing of the court at the time
[...More...]

"Cavalier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Alexander Leslie, 1st Earl Of Leven
Alexander
Alexander
(/ˈæləɡzˈændər/, /ˈæləɡzˈɑːndər/) is a male given name, and a less common surname. The name is derived from the Greek "Ἀλέξανδρος" (Aléxandroş), meaning "defender of men" from "αλεξω" (alexo), meaning "to defend, help" and "ανηρ" (aner), meaning "man" (genitive "ανδρος")
[...More...]

"Alexander Leslie, 1st Earl Of Leven" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

David Leslie (Scottish General)
David[a] is described in the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
as the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah. In the biblical narrative, David
David
is a young shepherd who first gains fame as a musician and later by killing Goliath. He becomes a favorite of King Saul
Saul
and a close friend of Saul's son Jonathan. Worried that David
David
is trying to take his throne, Saul
Saul
turns on David. After Saul and Jonathan are killed in battle, David
David
is anointed as King. David conquers Jerusalem, taking the Ark of the Covenant
Ark of the Covenant
into the city, and establishing the kingdom founded by Saul
[...More...]

"David Leslie (Scottish General)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ferdinando Fairfax, 2nd Lord Fairfax Of Cameron
Ferdinando
Ferdinando
may refer to:Contents1 Politics 2 Sports 3 Other 4 See alsoPolitics[edit] Ferdinando I de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany
Ferdinando I de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany
(1549–1609)
[...More...]

"Ferdinando Fairfax, 2nd Lord Fairfax Of Cameron" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Battle Of Aldbourne Chase
The Battle of Aldbourne
Aldbourne
Chase, in 1643, was a battle of the First English Civil War, in which a flying column of Royalist troops, led by Prince Rupert, attacked the dangerously extended Parliamentarian troops of Essex's army at Aldbourne
Aldbourne
Chase in Wiltshire. The action that followed was inconclusive, but allowed the Royalists to get to Newbury ahead of the Parliamentarian army.Contents1 Prelude 2 Battle 3 Aftermath 4 References 5 External linksPrelude[edit] After relieving the siege of Gloucester, Essex needed to bring his army back to London, and the Royalists saw an opportunity to stop him. Essex marched north on 10 September to Tewkesbury
Tewkesbury
to feint an attack on Worcester. However, the Royalist army blocked his path at Pershore, and Essex decided on the southern path back to London through Swindon, Newbury and Reading
[...More...]

"Battle Of Aldbourne Chase" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

First Battle Of Middlewich
The First Battle of Middlewich took place on 13 March 1643,[1] during the English Civil War, and was fought between the Parliamentarians, under Sir William Brereton, and the Royalist supporters of King Charles I of England, under Sir Thomas Aston.[2]v t eFirst English Civil War1st Hull Portsmouth Powick Bridge Kings Norton Edgehill Aylesbury Brentford Chichester Turnham Green Braddock Down Leeds 1st Middlewich Hopton Heath Seacroft Moor Camp Hill Lichfield Reading Ripple Field Sourton Down Stratton Wakefield 1st Worcester Chalgrove Field Adwalton Moor Burton Bridge Lansdowne Roundway Down 1st Bristol Gainsborough Gloucester Aldbourne Chase 1st Newbury 2nd Hull Heptonstall Winceby Olney Basing House Alton 2nd Middlewich Nantwich Lathom Newark Boldon Hill Stourbridge Heath Cheriton Selby Lyme Regis York Lincoln Bolton Tipton Green Cropredy Bridge Marston Moor Ormskirk Lostwithiel Montgomery 2nd Newbury Taunton Scarborough Naseby Langport 2nd Bristol Chester Rowton He
[...More...]

"First Battle Of Middlewich" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Battle Of Hopton Heath
Sir John Gell, 1st Baronet, Sir William Brereton, 1st BaronetStrength1,200: 1,100 cavalry, 100 infantry, artillery 1,500: infantry, cavalry, artilleryv t eFirst English Civil War1st Hull Portsmouth Powick Bridge Kings Norton Edgehill Aylesbury Brentford Chichester Turnham Green Braddock Down Leeds 1st Middlewich Hopton Heath Seacroft Moor Camp Hill Lichfield Reading Ripple Field Sourton Down Stratton Wakefield 1st Worcester Chalgrove Field Adwalton Moor Burton Bridge Lansdowne Roundway Down 1st Bristol Gainsborough Gloucester Aldbourne Chase 1st Newbury 2nd Hull Heptonstall Winceby Olney Basing House Alton 2nd Middlewich Nantwich Lathom Newark Boldon Hill Stourbridge Heath Cheriton Selby Lyme Regis York Lincoln Bolton Tipton Green Cropredy Bridge Marston Moor Ormskirk Lostwithiel Montgomery 2nd Newbury Taunton Scarborough Naseby Langport 2nd Bristol Chester Rowton Heath Torrington Stow-on-the-Wold Newark Oxford 2nd WorcesterThe Battle of Hopton
[...More...]

"Battle Of Hopton Heath" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Battle Of Seacroft Moor
The Battle of Seacroft Moor, on 30 March 1643, was a decisive loss for the Parliamentary forces during the First English Civil War. It took place near Seacroft, north east of Leeds, West Yorkshire, England. The battle reportedly turned the Cock Beck, which ran through the battlefield, red with the casualties' blood for several days.Contents1 Prelude 2 Battle 3 References 4 External linksPrelude[edit] As Sir Thomas Fairfax was instructed to capture Tadcaster, he fell back into the West Riding after failing to destroy the bridge over the Wharfe at Tadcaster. He was intercepted and pursued by Royalist horse under Lord George Goring, the lieutenant-general of horse to Sir William Cavendish, 1st Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, over the moors of Whinmoor and Bramham. Battle[edit] Fairfax's force, made up of mainly clubmen (local personnel, recruited to defend their area) crossed Bramham Moor safely, but began to straggle as they crossed Seacroft Moor
[...More...]

"Battle Of Seacroft Moor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Battle Of Camp Hill
The Battle of Camp Hill (or the Battle of Birmingham) took place in and around Camp Hill, during the First English Civil War, on Easter Monday, 3 April 1643, when a company of Parliamentarians from the Lichfield garrison with the support of some of the local townsmen, in all about 300 men, attempted to stop a detachment of Royalists, of about 1,200 cavalry and 200 foot men, under the command of Prince Rupert from passing through the unfortified parliamentary town of Birmingham. The Parliamentarians put up a surprisingly stout resistance, and according to the Royalists shot at them from houses as they drove the small Parliamentary force from the town and back towards Lichfield from whence they came. To suppress the musket fire, the Royalists torched the houses from which the shooting was thought to come. After the battle the Royalists spent the rest of the day in the town during which time they pillaged it
[...More...]

"Battle Of Camp Hill" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Siege Of Lichfield (1643)
The Siege of Lichfield (8–21 April 1643) was a victory for a besieging Royalist force under the command of Prince Rupert, that defeated the Parliamentary garrison of Lichfield in Staffordshire under the command of Colonel Russell who surrendered on terms.Contents1 Prelude 2 Siege 3 Aftermath 4 Notes 5 ReferencesPrelude[edit] Earlier in the war the Royalists had occupied the Close at Lichfield; Lord Brook, at the head of the Warwickshire and Staffordshire levies for Parliament, had besieged and taken the Close; during the siege Lord Brook had been killed.[2] King Charles I wanted Lichfield re-taken and turned into a Royal garrison, because the Royalists were in considerable need of ammunition, and their chief supply was drawn from the northern counties
[...More...]

"Siege Of Lichfield (1643)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Siege Of Reading
The Siege of Reading refers to the English Civil War
English Civil War
military campaign waged to besiege a Royalist garrison quartered in the town of Reading, Berkshire
Berkshire
from 4 November 1642 to 25 April 1643. Background[edit] In early October 1642, King Charles returned to Oxford
Oxford
from the indecisive Battle of Edgehill
Battle of Edgehill
(23 October). On 4 November, he entered Reading from Oxford
Oxford
and later that month retired, leaving a Royalist garrison of 2,000 foot-soldiers and a cavalry regiment under Sir Arthur Aston. The town and townspeople suffered many privations due to the demands of the garrison for money and lodging. On 23 April 1643, the Earl of Essex at the head of a Parliamentary army of 16,000 men left Windsor and laid siege to Reading using cannon
[...More...]

"Siege Of Reading" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Battle Of Ripple Field
The Battle of Ripple Field, fought on 13 April 1643, was an important engagement in the English Civil War. It was a Royalist victory, with the routing of a combined cavalry and infantry Parliamentarian force by a predominantly cavalry force led by Prince Maurice of the Palatinate. After marching north from Tewkesbury, Sir William Waller tried to contain the cavalry forces of Maurice on the western bank of the Severn, cutting this substantial force off from the rest of the Royalist army. Maurice successfully crossed the Severn at Upton-Upon-Severn, and quickly proceeded south through Ryall to meet with Waller's men who had taken a defensive position in Ripple Field. An initial cavalry charge by Waller was easily repelled by the Royalists, and the Parliamentarians retreated into the lanes of Ripple village, where a rout then took place. Parliament losses were considerable
[...More...]

"Battle Of Ripple Field" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.