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Marshall McLuhan
Herbert Marshall McLuhan
Marshall McLuhan
CC (July 21, 1911 – December 31, 1980) was a Canadian professor, philosopher, and public intellectual. His work is one of the cornerstones of the study of media theory.[2][3] Born in Edmonton, Alberta, McLuhan studied at the University of Manitoba and the University of Cambridge. He began his teaching career as a professor of English at several universities in the U.S
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Order Of Canada
This audio file was created from a revision of the article "Order of Canada" dated 2012-01-21, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. (Audio help) More spoken articlesThe Order of Canada
Canada
(French: Ordre du Canada) is a Canadian national order, admission into which is the second highest honour for merit in the system of orders, decorations, and medals of Canada. It comes second only to membership in the Order of Merit, which is the personal gift of Canada's monarch. To coincide with the centennial of Canadian Confederation, the three-tiered order was established in 1967 as a fellowship that recognizes the outstanding merit or distinguished service of Canadians who make a major difference to Canada
Canada
through lifelong contributions in every field of endeavour, as well as the efforts by non-Canadians who have made the world better by their actions
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Baptist
Baptists
Baptists
are Christians
Christians
distinguished by baptizing professing believers only (believer's baptism, as opposed to infant baptism), and doing so by complete immersion (as opposed to affusion or sprinkling). Baptist churches also generally subscribe to the tenets of soul competency/liberty, salvation through faith alone, scripture alone as the rule of faith and practice, and the autonomy of the local congregation
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Abbie Hoffman
Abbot Howard Hoffman (November 30, 1936 – April 12, 1989) was an American political and social activist, anarchist,[1][2][3] and revolutionary who co-founded the Youth International Party ("Yippies"). Hoffman was arrested and tried for conspiracy and inciting to riot as a result of his role in protests that led to violent confrontations with police during the 1968 Democratic National Convention, along with Jerry Rubin, David Dellinger, Tom Hayden, Rennie Davis, John Froines, Lee Weiner, and Bobby Seale. The group was known collectively as the " Chicago
Chicago
Eight"; when Seale's prosecution was separated from the others, they became known as the Chicago
Chicago
Seven
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Public Intellectual
An intellectual is a person who engages in critical thinking, research, and reflection about society and proposes solutions for its normative problems
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University Of Manitoba
The University
University
of Manitoba
Manitoba
(U of M, UMN, or UMB) is a public university in the province of Manitoba, Canada. Located in Winnipeg and founded in 1877, it was Western Canada's first university.[3][4] The university maintains a reputation as a top research-intensive post-secondary educational institution[3] and conducts more research annually than any other university in the region. It is the largest university both by total student enrollment and campus area in the province of Manitoba, and the 17th largest in all of Canada. The university's raised admissions standards, wide array of professional disciplines, and global outreach have resulted in one of the most diverse student bodies in Western Canada
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University Of Cambridge
The University of Cambridge
Cambridge
(informally Cambridge
Cambridge
University)[note 1] is a collegiate public research university in Cambridge, England. Founded in 1209 and granted a royal charter by King Henry III in 1231, Cambridge
Cambridge
is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's fourth-oldest surviving university.[8] The university grew out of an association of scholars who left the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
after a dispute with the townspeople.[9] The two medieval universities share many common features and are often referred to jointly as "Oxbridge"
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World Wide Web
The World Wide Web
World Wide Web
(abbreviated WWW or the Web) is an information space where documents and other web resources are identified by Uniform Resource Locators (URLs), interlinked by hypertext links, and can be accessed via the Internet.[1] English scientist Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
in 1989
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Married And Maiden Names
When a person (traditionally the wife in many cultures) assumes the family name of his or her spouse, that name replaces the person's birth surname, which in the case of the wife is called the maiden name (birth name is also used as a gender-neutral or masculine substitute for maiden name), whereas a married name is a family name or surname adopted by a person upon marriage. In some jurisdictions, changing one's name requires a legal procedure. Nevertheless, in some jurisdictions anyone who either marries or divorces may change his or her name
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Methodism
Methodism
Methodism
or the Methodist movement is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant
Protestant
Christianity
Christianity
which derive their inspiration from the life and teachings of John Wesley, an Anglican minister in England. George Whitefield
George Whitefield
and John Wesley's brother Charles Wesley
Charles Wesley
were also significant early leaders in the movement. It originated as a revival within the 18th century Church of England
Church of England
and became a separate denomination after Wesley's death. The movement spread throughout the British Empire, the United States, and beyond because of vigorous missionary work,[1] today claiming approximately 80 million adherents worldwide.[2][nb 1] Wesley's theology focused on sanctification and the effect of faith on the character of a Christian
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Neil Postman
Neil Postman (March 8, 1931 – October 5, 2003) was an American author, educator, media theorist and cultural critic, who is best known for his seventeen books, including Amusing Ourselves to Death (1985), Conscientious Objections (1988), Technopoly: The Surrender of Culture to Technology (1992), The Disappearance of Childhood (1994) and The End of Education: Redefining the Value of School (1995). For more than forty years, he was associated with New York University. Postman was a humanist, who believed that "new technology can never substitute for human values"
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World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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Canadian Forces
The Canadian Armed Forces
Canadian Armed Forces
(CAF; French: Forces armées canadiennes, FAC), or Canadian Forces (CF) (French: Forces canadiennes, FC),[11] are the unified armed forces of Canada, as constituted by the National Defence Act, which states: "The Canadian Forces are the armed forces of Her Majesty raised by Canada
Canada
and consist of one Service called the Canadian Armed Forces."[11] This unified institution consists of sea, land, and air elements referred to as the Royal Canadian Navy
Royal Canadian Navy
(RCN), Canadian Army, and Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF). Personnel may belong to either the Regular Force or the Reserve Force, which has four sub-components: the Primary Reserve, Supplementary Reserve, Cadet Organizations Administration and Training Service, and the Canadian Rangers
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Influenza
Influenza, commonly known as "the flu", is an infectious disease caused by an influenza virus.[1] Symptoms can be mild to severe.[4] The most common symptoms include: a high fever, runny nose, sore throat, muscle pains, headache, coughing, and feeling tired.[1] These symptoms typically begin two days after exposure to the virus and most last less than a week.[1] The cough, however, may last for more than two weeks.[1] In children, there may be nausea and vomiting, but these are not common in adults.[5] Nausea and vomiting occur more commonly in the unrelated infection gastroenteritis, which is sometimes inaccurately referred to as "stomach flu" or the "24-hour flu".[5] Complications of influenza may include viral pneumonia, secondary bacterial pneumonia, sinus infections, and worsening of previous health problems such as a
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Winnipeg
Winnipeg
Winnipeg
(/ˈwɪnɪpɛɡ/ ( listen)) is the capital and largest city of the province of Manitoba
Manitoba
in Canada. It is near the longitudinal centre of North America and is 110 kilometres (70 mi) from the Canada– United States
United States
border.[14] It is also the place of the confluence of the Red and Assiniboine Rivers. The city is named after the nearby Lake Winnipeg; the name comes from the Western Cree words for muddy water. The region was a trading centre for aboriginal peoples long before the arrival of Europeans. French traders built the first fort on the site in 1738. A settlement was later founded by the Selkirk settlers of the Red River Colony
Red River Colony
in 1812, the nucleus of which was incorporated as the City of Winnipeg
Winnipeg
in 1873
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Agnosticism
Related concepts and fundamentals:Agnosticism Epistemology Presupposition Probabilityv t e Agnosticism
Agnosticism
is the view that the existence of God, of the divine or the supernatural is unknown or unknowable.[1][2][3] According to the philosopher William L. Rowe, "agnosticism is the view that human reason is incapable of providing sufficient rational grounds to justify either the belief that God
God
exists or the belief that God
God
does not exist".[2] Agnosticism
Agnosticism
is the doctrine or tenet of agnostics with regard to the existence of anything beyond and behind material phenomena or to knowledge of a First Cause or God,[4] and is not a religion. English biologist Thomas Henry Huxley
Thomas Henry Huxley
coined the word "agnostic" in 1869
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