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Marsh Chapel
Marsh Chapel
Marsh Chapel
is a building on the campus of Boston University
Boston University
used as the official place of worship of the school, named after former president of BU, Daniel L. Marsh, who was also a Methodist minister.[1] The building is Gothic in style. While Methodism, the university's historical denomination, exerts a great influence on the chapel, it is formally non-denominational. The current dean of Marsh Chapel is Rev. Dr. Robert Hill, an ordained elder in The United Methodist
Methodist
Church.[2]Contents1 History 2 Good Friday experiment 3 Influence on Civil Rights Movement 4 Other notable figures associated with Marsh Chapel 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] Plans for a riverside chapel at the university were made as early as 1920, when the university purchased the 15-acre (0.061 km2) Charles River Campus and commissioned a master plan from architect Ralph Adams Cram
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Boston, Massachusetts
Boston
Boston
(/ˈbɒstən/ ( listen) BOS-tən) is the capital city and most populous municipality[9] of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States
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Methodist
Methodism
Methodism
or the Methodist movement is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant
Protestant
Christianity
Christianity
which derive their inspiration from the life and teachings of John Wesley, an Anglican minister in England. George Whitefield
George Whitefield
and John Wesley's brother Charles Wesley
Charles Wesley
were also significant early leaders in the movement. It originated as a revival within the 18th century Church of England
Church of England
and became a separate denomination after Wesley's death. The movement spread throughout the British Empire, the United States, and beyond because of vigorous missionary work,[1] today claiming approximately 80 million adherents worldwide.[2][nb 1] Wesley's theology focused on sanctification and the effect of faith on the character of a Christian
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Martin Luther King, Jr.
CampaignsMontgomery bus boycott Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom Youth March for Integrated Schools Albany Movement Birmingham campaign Walk to Freedom March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom St. Augustine movement Selma to Montgomery marches Chicago
Chicago
Open Housing Movement March Against Fear Memphis sanitation strike Poor People's CampaignDeath and memorialAssassination American federal holiday National memorial National Historical Parkv t eMartin Luther King
King
Jr. (January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968) was an American Baptist minister and activist who became the most visible spokesperson and leader in the civil rights movement from 1954 until his death in 1968
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Robert Cummings Neville
Robert Cummings Neville (born May 1, 1939 in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.) is an American systematic philosopher and theologian, author of numerous books and papers, and ex-Dean of the Boston University
Boston University
School of Theology. J. Harley Chapman and Nancy Frankenberry, editors of a festchrift—a collection of critical essays written in Neville's honor—entitled Interpreting Neville, consider him to be "one of the most significant philosophers and theologians of our time".[1] Neville was Dean of Humanities and Fine Arts at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and has taught at Yale, Fordham, and the State University of New York Purchase
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Collegiate Gothic
Collegiate Gothic
Collegiate Gothic
was an architectural style subgenre of Gothic Revival architecture, popular in the late-19th and early-20th centuries for college and high school buildings in the United States and Canada, and to a certain extent Europe. A form of historicist architecture, it took its inspiration from English Tudor and Gothic buildings. It has returned in the 21st century in the form of prominent new buildings at schools and universities including Princeton and Yale.[1] Ralph Adams Cram, arguably the leading Gothic Revival architect and theoretician in the early 20th century, stated the appeal of the Gothic for educational facilities in his book Gothic Quest as, "Through architecture and its allied arts we have the power to bend men and sway them as few have who depended on the spoken word. It is for us, as part of our duty as our highest privilege to act ..
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Alexander Graham Bell
Alexander Graham Bell
Alexander Graham Bell
(March 3, 1847 – August 2, 1922)[4] was a Scottish-born[N 2] scientist, inventor, engineer, and innovator who is credited with patenting the first practical telephone[7] and founding the American Telephone
Telephone
and Telegraph
Telegraph
Company (AT&T) in 1885.[8][9] Bell's father, grandfather, and brother had all been associated with work on elocution and speech and both his mother and wife were deaf, profoundly influencing Bell's life's work.[10] His research on hearing and speech further led him to experiment with hearing devices which eventually culminated in Bell being awarded the first U.S
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Gothic Revival
Gothic Revival (also referred to as Victorian Gothic or neo-Gothic) is an architectural movement that began in the late 1740s in England. Its popularity grew rapidly in the early 19th century, when increasingly serious and learned admirers of neo-Gothic styles sought to revive medieval Gothic architecture, in contrast to the neoclassical styles prevalent at the time
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Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Massachusetts
(/ˌmæsəˈtʃuːsɪts/ ( listen), /-zɪts/), officially known as the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, is the most populous state in the New England
New England
region of the northeastern United States. It is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the east, the states of Connecticut
Connecticut
and Rhode Island
Rhode Island
to the south, New Hampshire
New Hampshire
and Vermont
Vermont
to the north, and New York to the west. The state is named after the Massachusett
Massachusett
tribe, which once inhabited the east side of the area. The capital of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
and the most populous city in New England
New England
is Boston
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Non-denominational
A non-denominational person or organization is not restricted to any particular or specific religious denomination. Overview[edit] The term has been used in the context of various faiths including Jainism,[1] Baha'i Faith,[2] Zoroastrianism,[3] Unitarian Universalism,[4] paganism,[5] Christianity,[6] Islam,[7] Judaism,[8] Hinduism,[9] Buddhism[10] and Wicca.[11] It stands in contrast with a religious denomination. Religionists of a non-denominational persuasion tend to be more open-minded in the views on various religious matters and rulings
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Gothic Architecture
Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
is an architectural style that flourished in Europe
Europe
during the High and Late Middle Ages. It evolved from Romanesque architecture
Romanesque architecture
and was succeeded by Renaissance
Renaissance
architecture. Originating in 12th century France
France
and lasting into the 16th century, Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
was known during the period as Opus Francigenum ("French work") with the term Gothic first appearing during the later part of the Renaissance. Its characteristics include the pointed arch, the ribbed vault (which evolved from the joint vaulting of Romanesque architecture) and the flying buttress. Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
is most familiar as the architecture of many of the great cathedrals, abbeys and churches of Europe
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Boston Confucians
Boston
Boston
Confucians are a group of "New Confucians" from Boston, of whom the best known are Tu Wei-Ming of Harvard, John Berthrong and Robert Neville of Boston
Boston
University. Boston
Boston
Confucianism
Confucianism
refers to those who hold that Confucianism
Confucianism
could be successfully adapted to a Western perspective. Confucianism
Confucianism
is seen as a tradition with rich spiritual and cultural resources that can inform other world traditions. Boston
Boston
Confucianism
Confucianism
also argues for the transportability of Confucianism
Confucianism
to geographical locations beyond Asia proper
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Civil Rights Movement
The civil rights movement (also known as the African-American civil rights movement, American civil rights movement and other terms)[b] was a decades long movement with the goal of securing legal rights for African Americans
African Americans
that other Americans
Americans
already held. With roots starting in the Reconstruction era
Reconstruction era
during the late 19th century, the movement resulted in the largest legislative impacts after the direct actions and grassroots protests organized from the mid-1950s until 1968
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Dean (Christianity)
A dean, in a church context, is a cleric holding certain positions of authority within a religious hierarchy. The title is used mainly in the Anglican Communion, the Roman Catholic Church, and many Lutheran denominations. A dean's assistant is called a subdean.Contents1 Officials 2 Anglican Communion2.1 Cathedrals 2.2 Rural or area deaneries 2.3 Other uses3 Catholic Church 4 Lutheran Church 5 United Methodism 6 Other uses 7 See also 8 ReferencesOfficials[edit] In the church, the Dean of the College of Cardinals
Dean of the College of Cardinals
and the Cardinal Vice-Dean are the president and vice-president of the college. Both are elected. Except for presiding and delegating administrative tasks, they have no authority over the cardinals, acting as primus inter pares (first among equals). In the academic community, the Dean is the academic leader of the Faculty who presides over the Faculty Board and administration
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Groundbreaking
Groundbreaking, also known as cutting, sod-cutting, turning the first sod or a sod-turning ceremony, is a traditional ceremony in many cultures that celebrates the first day of construction for a building or other project. Such ceremonies are often attended by dignitaries such as politicians and businessmen. The actual shovel used during the groundbreaking is often a special ceremonial shovel, usually colored gold, meant to be saved for subsequent display and may be engraved.[1][2]Contents1 Other uses 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksOther uses[edit] The term groundbreaking, when used as an adjective, may mean being or making something that has never been done, seen, or made before; "stylistically innovative works". See also[edit]Look up groundbreaking in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Builders' rites Topping out Cornerstone Publicity stunt Ribbon cutting ceremonyReferences[edit]^ jwise@dothaneagle.com, Jeremy Wise
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