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Marquess Of Queensberry Rules
The Marquess of Queensberry Rules are a code of generally accepted rules in the sport of boxing. Drafted in London in 1865 and published in 1867, they were named so as John Douglas, 9th Marquess of Queensberry publicly endorsed the code,[1] although they were written by a Welsh sportsman named John Graham Chambers. The code of rules on which modern boxing is based, the Queensberry rules were the first to mandate the use of gloves in boxing.[2] The Queensberry Rules eventually superseded the London Prize Ring Rules (revised in 1853), and are intended for use in both professional and amateur boxing matches, thus separating it from the less-popular American Fair Play Rules, which were strictly intended for amateur matches
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Vanity Fair (UK Magazine)
The second Vanity Fair was a British weekly magazine published from 1868 to 1914.Contents1 History 2 Caricatures 3 Image gallery 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Subtitled "A Weekly Show of Political, Social and Literary Wares", it was founded by Thomas Gibson Bowles, who aimed to expose the contemporary vanities of Victorian society. The first issue appeared in London on 7 November 1868. It offered its readership articles on fashion, current events, the theatre, books, social events and the latest scandals, together with serial fiction, word games and other trivia. Bowles wrote much of the magazine himself under various pseudonyms, such as "Jehu Junior", but contributors included Lewis Carroll, Arthur Hervey, Willie Wilde, P. G
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Counterpunch (boxing)
A counterpunch is a boxing punch that immediately follows an attack launched by an opponent. It exploits the opening created in an opponent's guard. Technique[edit] Counterpunchers are tactical, defensive fighters who rely on opponent mistakes in order to gain an attacking advantage to get score cards or the chance of a knockout. They use their well-rounded defensive skills to avoid or block shots in order immediately to place well-timed punches on opponents who have lost their guard. Boxers who fight against counter punchers must constantly feint and conceal their offensive punches to prevent anticipation for the counterpunch
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Punching Power
Punching power
Punching power
is the amount of kinetic energy in a person's punches. Knockout
Knockout
power is a similar concept relating to the probability of any strike to the head to cause unconsciousness. Knockout
Knockout
power is related to the force delivered and precision of the strike. In order to increase the mass behind a punch, it is essential to move the body as a unit throughout the punch. Power is generated from the ground up, such that force from the ankles transfers to the knees; force from the knees transfers to the thighs; force from the thighs transfers to the core; from the core to the chest; from the chest to the shoulders; from the shoulders to the forearms and finally the compounded force transfers through the fist into an opponent
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Punch-out (boxing Slang)
A Punch-Out is a slang term in professional boxing referring to a boxer who boasts and taunts his opponent but can not hold his own in the ring in actual boxing competition. Informally defined, it could be best described as being able to "talk the talk" but not back it up in the ring. It may also refer to a training exercise, in which the boxer throws repeating Jab
Jab
and Straight punches or "One-two Combos" until told to stop. This may be repeated one to eight times depending on the trainer The term is outstandingly used in a quote the film Rocky II
Rocky II
by Burt Young playing the character Paulie, who instructs Rocky to "Blow this punch-out!" in response to Apollo Creed's taunting at a press conference. The term was also used as the name for a popular arcade game titled Punch-Out!!, and then later a spinoff of the game for the Nintendo Entertainment System titled Mike Tyson's Punch-Out!!
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Punch (combat)
A punch is a striking blow with the fist.[1] It is used in some martial arts and combat sports, most notably Boxing
Boxing
where it is the only type of offensive technique allowed. In sports, hand wraps or other padding such as gloves may be used to protect athletes and practitioners from injuring themselves.[2][3] The use of punches varies between different martial arts and combat sports. Styles such as Boxing
Boxing
or Russian fist fighting
Russian fist fighting
use punches alone, while others such as Kickboxing, Muay Thai, or Karate
Karate
may use both punches and kicks. Others such as wrestling and judo (punches and other striking techniques, atemi, are present in judo kata, but are forbidden in competitions) do not use punches at all
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Jab
Albanian: Dir Hebrew: ישרה Russia:Джеб Estonian: Sirge Czech: Direkt Polish: Prosty Serbian: Предњи директ (кец) Italian: Diretto French: Direct (bras avant) Romanian: Directă (braţ faţă) Japanese: Kizami zuki / Jun zuki (Choku-zuki) Chinese: 前手直拳 Thai: Mud Trong Burmese: Pyon Latt-di German: GeradeFocus StrikingA jab is a type of punch used in the martial arts. Several variations of the jab exist, but every jab shares these characteristics: while in a fighting stance, the lead fist is thrown straight ahead and the arm is fully extended
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Cross (boxing)
France: Direct (bras arrière) Serbia: Задњи директ (двојка) Romania: Directă (braţ spate) Japan: Gyaku-zuki China: 後手直拳 Russia:Кросс Thailand: Mud Trong Burma: Pyon Latt-di Poland: Prosty Ukraine: Крос Bulgaria: Прав ударFocus StrikingIn boxing, a cross (also commonly called a straight)[1] is a punch usually thrown with the dominant hand the instant an opponent leads with his opposite hand. The blow crosses over the leading arm, hence its name. It is a power-punch like the uppercut and hook. Compubox, a computerized punch scoring system, counts the cross as a power-punch. Technique[edit] From the guard position, the rear hand is thrown from the chin, crossing the body and travelling towards the target in a straight line. The rear shoulder is thrust forward and finishes just touching the outside of the chin. At the same time, the lead hand is retracted and tucked against the face to protect the inside of the chin
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Hook (boxing)
Israel: מגל Spain: Gancho Estonia: Haak Serbia: Кроше Finland: Koukku France: Crochet (coup crocheté) Germany: Haken Romania: Croşeu Russia: Хук Italy: Gancio Thailand: Mat Wiyeng San Burma: Wai Latt-di Poland: Sierpowy Greece: Κροσέ (krose) Turkey: Kroşe (croche) China: 摆拳 Latvia: Āķis Lithuania: Kablys Ukraine: Гук Saudi Arabia: خطاف Bulgaria: КрошеFocus StrikingA hook is a punch in boxing.[1] It is performed by turning the core muscles and back, thereby swinging the arm, which is bent at an angle near or at 90 degrees, in a horizontal arc into the opponent.[1][2] A hook is usually aimed at the jaw, but it can also be used for body shots, especially to the liver. Left Hook punches can be thrown by either the lead hand or the rear hand, but the term used without a qualifier usually refers to a lead hook. When throwing a hook, the puncher shifts his body weight to the lead foot, allowing him to pivot his lead foot
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Swing (boxing)
France: Coup balancé Japan: China: 擺拳/拋拳 Thailand: Mat Wiyeng Yao Burma: Wai Latt-diFocus StrikingThe swing is a type of hook, with the main difference being that in the swing the arm is usually more extended.right hook in attackright hookcounter punchright hook(in corner)Wikimedia Commons has media related to Boxing.External links[edit]BoxRec.comv t eBoxingProfessional boxing Amateur boxing Women's boxing White-collar boxing London Prize Ring Rules Marquess of Queensberry Rules KickboxingTermsThe distance Weight class Pound for pound Lineal championship Cutman Gatekeeper Journeyman KnockoutCorner retirementLong Count Outpoint Punching power Punch-outPunchesJab Cross Hook (Swing) Uppercut Overhand Counterpunch (Cross-counter) Bolo punch Short straight-punch Rabbit punch Liver shot Below the beltStyles and techniqueBob and weave Bobbing Head
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Uppercut
Turkey: Aparkat Israel: סנוקרת Estonia: Lõuahaak Serbia: Аперкат Russia: Апперкот Finland: kohokoukku France: Coup remontant Romania: Upercut Italy: Montante Korea: 어퍼컷 Japan: アッパーカット/アッパー China: 勾拳 Poland: podbródkowy Spain: Gancho Thailand: Mat-soy Burma: Pin Latt-di United States: Uppercut Germany:Aufwärtshaken Ukraine: Аперкот Bulgaria: ЪперкътFocus StrikingThe uppercut (formerly known as the undercut; sometimes also referred to as the upper) is a punch used in boxing that travels along a vertical line at the opponent's chin or solar plexus.[1][2] It is, along with the cross, one of the two main punches that count in the statistics as power punches.[citation needed] Uppercuts are useful when thrown at close range, because they are considered to cause more damage when at close range.[citation needed] Additionally, it is likely that a boxer would miss if the uppercut is thrown wh
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Overhand (boxing)
coup de poing descendant прекоручниFocus StrikingAn overhand (or overcut or drop) is a semi-circular and vertical punch thrown with the rear hand. It is usually employed when the opponent is bobbing or slipping
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Cross-counter
A cross-counter is a counter-attack begun immediately after an opponent throws a jab, exploiting the opening in the opponent's position.A right straight punch on instance-as a counter-punch (cross) after an opponent's left jabA left jab on instance-as a counter-punch (cross) after an opponent's left jabv t eBoxingProfessional boxing Amateur boxing Women's boxing White-collar boxing London Prize Ring Rules Marquess of Queensberry Rules KickboxingTermsThe distance Weight class Pound for pound Lineal championship Cutman Gatekeeper Journeyman KnockoutCorner retirementLong Count Outpoint Punching power Punch-outPunchesJab Cross Hook (Swing) Uppercut Overhand Counterpunch (Cross-counter) Bolo punch Short straight-punch Rabbit punch Liver shot Below the beltStyles and techniqueBob and weave Bobbing Head fake Slipping One-two combo Check hook Peek-a-Boo Rope-a-dope FootworkOrthodox stance Southpaw
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Corner Retirement
A corner retirement[1][2][3] or corner stoppage,[4][5] abbreviated "RTD" by BoxRec, are terms used in boxing to describe a fight that ends when, during any rest period between rounds, a boxer refuses to continue or their corner pulls them out, thereby forcing the referee to call an end to the fight. In contrast, a technical knockout (TKO) may only be declared by the referee or ringside doctor, at any stage of the fight including rest periods. In either case, an RTD still counts as a type of knockout, and is displayed as a stoppage result on a boxer's win/loss record. References[edit]^ Staff (2 October 2014). "On This Day: Larry Holmes thrashes the remnants of Muhammad Ali". Boxing
Boxing
News. Newsquest. Retrieved 29 March 2016. ^ Bonnett, Derek (29 March 2015). "On the Move: SecondsOut World Rankings 3-29-15". SecondsOut. Knockout
Knockout
Entertainment Ltd. Retrieved 29 March 2016. ^ Gray, Tom (21 March 2015)
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Bolo Punch
France: Semi-circulaire Serbia: Фрљотка Romania: Semi-circulară Thailand: Mat Wiyeng San Burma: Wai Latt-diFocus StrikingCreator PhilippinesA bolo punch is a punch used in martial arts. The bolo punch is not among the traditional boxing punches (jab, uppercut, hook and cross). Bolo is a Filipino word for machete. The primary use for the bolo is clearing vegetation, however the bolo is also used in Filipino martial arts and is one of the main weapons trained in the martial art. After the United States defeated Spain in the Spanish–American War, they took over occupation of the Philippine Islands. Many Filipinos began emigrating to the United States, mostly California and Hawaii, as farm laborers. Many of the Filipino immigrants were practitioners of the Filipino martial arts which included the boxing art known as Suntukan, Panantukan, and Pangamot
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Short Straight-punch
France: Direct court au corps-à-corps Serbia: КратежFocus StrikingThis article may be confusing or unclear to readers. Please help us clarify the article. There might be a discussion about this on the talk page. (March 2009) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)The short straight punch is an offensive hand technique used in some fighting sports.Wikimedia Commons has media related to Boxing
Boxing
technique. Short straight-punch
Short straight-punch
in shadow-boxing Short straight-punch
Short straight-punch
in clinch Short straight-punch
Short straight-punch
in counterpunchSources[edit]Georges Blanchet, Boxe et sports de combat en éducation physique, Ed. Chiron, Paris, 1947 Alain Delmas, 1. Lexique de la boxe et des autres boxes (Document fédéral de formation d’entraîneur), Aix-en-Provence, 1981-2005 – 2
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