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Marobodus
Maroboduus (born circa 30 BC, died in AD 37), was a Romanized king of the Germanic Suebi, who under pressure from the wars of the Cherusci and Romans, and losing the Suevic Semnones
Semnones
and Langobardi
Langobardi
from his kingdom, moved with the Marcomanni
Marcomanni
into the forests of Bohemia, near to the Quadi. The name "Maroboduus" can be broken down into two Celtic elements, māro- meaning "great" (cf. Welsh mawr, Irish mór), and bodwos meaning "raven" (cf. Irish badhbh).[1];[2];[3]Contents1 Biography 2 War with Arminius
Arminius
and death 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksBiography[edit] Maroboduus was born into a noble family of the Marcomanni
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Marbodius Of Rennes
Marbodus, Marbod or Marbode of Rennes (c. 1035 – 11 September 1123) was archdeacon and schoolmaster at Angers, France, then Bishop of Rennes in Brittany. He was a respected poet, hagiographer, and hymnologist.Contents1 Biography 2 Writings 3 Translations and Adaptations 4 Notes 5 SourcesBiography[edit] Marbod was born near Angers
Angers
in Anjou, France, presumably in the mid-1030s. He received at least part of his early education at Angers under archdeacon and schoolmaster Rainaldus (d. c. 1076), who may have been trained by Fulbert of Chartres. Several of Marbod's family members were in the entourage of Count Fulk le Réchin
Fulk le Réchin
of Anjou.[1] Marbod was a canon in the cathedral chapter of Saint-Maurice of Angers as early as c. 1068
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Tacitus
Publius (or Gaius) Cornelius Tacitus
Tacitus
(/ˈtæsɪtəs/; Classical Latin: [ˈtakɪtʊs]; c. 56 – c. 120 AD) was a senator and a historian of the Roman Empire. The surviving portions of his two major works—the Annals and the Histories—examine the reigns of the Roman emperors Tiberius, Claudius, Nero, and those who reigned in the Year of the Four Emperors
Year of the Four Emperors
(69 AD). These two works span the history of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
from the death of Augustus, in 14 AD, to the years of the First Jewish–Roman War, in 70 AD
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Goths
The Goths
Goths
were an East Germanic people, two of whose branches, the Visigoths
Visigoths
and the Ostrogoths, played an important role in the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and the emergence of Medieval Europe. The Goths
Goths
dominated a vast area,[1] which at its peak under the Germanic king Ermanaric and his sub-king Athanaric possibly extended all the way from the Danube
Danube
to the Don, and from the Black Sea
Black Sea
to the Baltic Sea.[2] The Goths
Goths
spoke the Gothic language, one of the extinct East Germanic languages
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Ravenna
Ravenna
Ravenna
(Italian pronunciation: [raˈvenna], also locally [raˈvɛnna] ( listen); Romagnol: Ravèna) is the capital city of the Province of Ravenna, in the Emilia-Romagna
Emilia-Romagna
region of Northern Italy. It was the capital city of the Western Roman Empire from 402 until that empire collapsed in 476. It then served as the capital of the Ostrogothic Kingdom
Ostrogothic Kingdom
until it was re-conquered in 540 by the Byzantine Empire. Afterwards, the city formed the centre of the Byzantine Exarchate of Ravenna
Exarchate of Ravenna
until the invasion of the Lombards
Lombards
in 751, after which it became the seat of the Kingdom of the Lombards. Although an inland city, Ravenna
Ravenna
is connected to the Adriatic Sea
Adriatic Sea
by the Candiano Canal
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Hermunduri
The Hermunduri, Hermanduri, Hermunduli, Hermonduri, or Hermonduli were an ancient Germanic tribe, who occupied an area near the Elbe
Elbe
river, around what is now Thuringia, Bohemia, Saxony
Saxony
(in East Germany), and Franconia
Franconia
in northern Bavaria, from the first to the third century. At times, they apparently moved to the Danube
Danube
frontier with Rome. The Thuringii
Thuringii
may have been the descendants of the Hermunduri
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Vibilius
Vibilius or Vibillius (flourished in 1st century AD) was a powerful king of the Hermunduri
Hermunduri
in the 1st century AD, mentioned in The Annals of the Roman historian Tacitus. According to Tacitus, Vibilius deposed the Marcomannic king Catualda, who had himself deposed Maroboduus in 18 AD.[1] Catualda was subsequently succeeded by the Quadian client king Vannius. In 50 AD however, along with Vannius' nephews Vangio and Sido and allied Lugii, Vibilius also in turn led the deposition of Vannius.[2] Notes[edit]^ Tacitus. The Annals.2.63 ^ Tacitus. The Annals.12.29Sources[edit]Tacitus, The AnnalsThis biography of a member of a European royal house is a stub
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Vannius
Vannius (flourished in 1st century AD) was the king of the Germanic tribe Quadi. According to The Annals
The Annals
of Tacitus, Vannius came to power following the defeat of the Marcomannic king Catualda by the Hermunduri
Hermunduri
king of Vibilius, establishing The Kingdom of Vannius (regnum Vannianum).[1] It was the first political unit in the area that is now Slovakia. Vannius was a client King of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and ruled from 20-50AD under the reign of Tiberius. Tacitus
Tacitus
writes that he was "renowned and popular with his countrymen," but after a long reign, he "became a tyrant, and the enmity of neighbours, joined to intestine strife, was his ruin." Joined by Vangio and Sido, sons of a sister of Vannius, Vibilius of the Hermunduri
Hermunduri
again led the deposition
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Vangio And Sido
Vangio and Sido (flourished in 1st century AD) were two Quadian brothers who were the co-rulers of a Roman client kingdom in Bohemia in the 1st century AD. According to The Annals
The Annals
of Tacitus, Vangio and Sido were the sons of a sister of Vannius, who since defeating the Marcomannic king Catualda in 18 AD had ruled The Kingdom of Vannius (regnum Vannianum).[1] Tacitus
Tacitus
writes their uncle was "renowned and popular with his countrymen," but after a long reign, he "became a tyrant, and the enmity of neighbours, joined to intestine strife, was his ruin." Around 50 AD, assisted by the Hermunduri
Hermunduri
king Vibilius, Vangio and Sido led the deposition of Vannius
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Strabo
Strabo[1] (/ˈstreɪboʊ/; Greek: Στράβων Strábōn; 64 or 63 BC – c. AD 24) was a Greek geographer, philosopher, and historian who lived in Asia Minor
Asia Minor
during the transitional period of the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
into the Roman Empire.Contents1 Life 2 Education 3 Geographica 4 Geology 5 Editions 6 Notes 7 References 8 Sources 9 External linksLife[edit]Title page from Isaac Casaubon's 1620 edition of Geographica Strabo
Strabo
was born to an affluent family from Amaseia in Pontus (modern Amasya, Turkey),[2] a city that he said was situated the approximate equivalent of 75 km from the Black Sea
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Cassius Dio
Cassius Dio or Dio Cassius[note 2] (/ˈkæʃəs ˈdiːoʊ/; c. 155–235)[note 3] was a Roman statesman and historian of Greek origin. He published 80 volumes of history on Ancient Rome, beginning with the arrival of Aeneas
Aeneas
in Italy. The volumes documented the subsequent founding of Rome (753 BC), the formation of the Republic (509 BC), and the creation of the Empire (31 BC), up until 229 AD. Written in Ancient Greek over 22 years, Dio's work covers approximately 1,000 years of history. Many of his 80 books have survived intact, or as fragments, providing modern scholars with a detailed perspective on Roman history.Contents1 Biography 2 Roman History 3 Literary style 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksBiography[edit] Lucius Cassius Dio was the son of Cassius Apronianus, a Roman senator, who was born and raised at Nicaea
Nicaea
in Bithynia
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Annals (Tacitus)
The Annals (Latin: Annales) by Roman historian and senator Tacitus[1] is a history of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
from the reign of Tiberius
Tiberius
to that of Nero, the years AD 14–68.[2] The Annals are an important source for modern understanding of the history of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
during the 1st century AD;[3] it is Tacitus' final work, and modern historians generally consider it his greatest writing.[4] Historian Ronald Mellor calls it "Tacitus's crowning achievement,” which represents the "pinnacle of Roman historical writing".[5] Tacitus' Histories and Annals together amounted to 30 books; although some scholars disagree about which work to assign some books to, traditionally 14 are assigned to Histories and 16 to Annals
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Germanicus
Germanicus
Germanicus
(Latin: Germanicus
Germanicus
Julius Caesar; 24 May 15 BC – 10 October AD 19) was a member of the Julio-Claudian dynasty
Julio-Claudian dynasty
and a prominent general of the Roman Empire, who was known for his campaigns in Germania. The son of Nero Claudius Drusus
Nero Claudius Drusus
and Antonia Minor, Germanicus
Germanicus
was born into an influential branch of the patrician gens Claudia. The agnomen Germanicus
Germanicus
was added to his full name in 9 BC when it was posthumously awarded to his father in honor of his victories in Germania. In AD 4, he was adopted by his paternal uncle, Tiberius, who succeeded Augustus
Augustus
as Roman emperor
Roman emperor
a decade later
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Reallexikon Der Germanischen Altertumskunde
Germanische Altertumskunde Online, formerly called Reallexikon der Germanischen Altertumskunde, is a German encyclopedia of the study of Germanic history and cultures, as well as the cultures that were in close contact with them. The first edition of the Reallexikon der Germanischen Altertumskunde appeared in four volumes between 1911 and 1919, edited by Johannes Hoops. The second edition, under the auspices of the Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities, was edited by Heinrich Beck (from vol 1, 1968/72), Heiko Steuer (from vol. 8, 1991/94), Rosemarie Müller (from 1992), and Dieter Geuenich (from vol. 13, 1999), and was published by Walter de Gruyter
Walter de Gruyter
between 1969 and 2008. In 2010, the most recent version was published, now renamed Germanische Altertumskunde Online
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