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Market Capitalization
Market capitalization
Market capitalization
(market cap) is the market value at a point in time of the shares outstanding of a publicly traded company, being equal to the share price at that point of time multiplied by the number of shares outstanding.[2][3] As outstanding stock is bought and sold in public markets, capitalization could be used as an indicator of public opinion of a company's net worth and is a determining factor in some forms of stock valuation. Market capitalization
Market capitalization
is used by the investment community in ranking the size of companies, as opposed to sales or total asset figures. It is also used in ranking the relative size of stock exchanges, being a measure of the sum of the market capitalizations of all companies listed on each stock exchange
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Financial Market
A financial market is a market in which people trade financial securities, commodities, and value at low transaction costs and at prices that reflect supply and demand. Securities include stocks and bonds, and commodities include precious metals or agricultural products. The term "market" is sometimes used for what are more strictly exchanges, organizations that facilitate the trade in financial securities, e.g., a stock exchange or commodity exchange. This may be a physical location (like the NYSE, BSE, LSE, JSE) or an electronic system (like NASDAQ)
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Macroeconomics
Macroeconomics
Macroeconomics
(from the Greek prefix makro- meaning "large" and economics) is a branch of economics dealing with the performance, structure, behavior, and decision-making of an economy as a whole. This includes regional, national, and global economies.[1] Macroeconomists study aggregated indicators such as GDP, unemployment rates, national income, price indices, and the interrelations among the different sectors of the economy to better understand how the whole economy functions. Macroeconomists develop models that explain the relationship between such fac
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World Federation Of Exchanges
The World Federation of Exchanges (WFE), formerly the Federation Internationale des Bourses de Valeurs (FIBV), or International Federation of Stock
Stock
Exchanges, is the trade association of 63 publicly regulated stock, futures, and options exchanges. Its market operators are responsible for operating the key components of the financial world. It is based in London, United Kingdom,[1] and was founded in 1961.[2]Contents1 Members 2 Affiliates 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksMembers[edit] To be a member, exchanges must adhere to the WFE Membership Criteria. Candidates are selected following a peer review
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Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
is a digital archive of the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and other information on the Internet
Internet
created by the Internet
Internet
Archive, a nonprofit organization, based in San Francisco, California, United States.Contents1 History 2 Technical details2.1 Storage capabilities 2.2 Growth 2.3 Website exclusion policy2.3.1 Oakland Archive
Archive
Policy3 Uses3.1 In legal evidence3.1.1 Civil litigation3.1.1.1 Netbula LLC v. Chordiant Software Inc. 3.1.1.2 Telewizja Polska3.1.2 Patent law 3.1.3 Limitations of utility4 Legal status 5 Archived content legal issues5.1 Scientology 5.2 Healthcare Advocates, Inc. 5.3 Suzanne Shell 5.4 Daniel Davydiuk6 Censorship and other threats 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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Reuters
Reuters
Reuters
(/ˈrɔɪtərz/) is an international news agency headquartered in London, United Kingdom. It is a division of Thomson Reuters. Until 2008, the Reuters
Reuters
news agency formed part of an independent company, Reuters Group
Reuters Group
plc, which was also a provider of financial market data. Since the acquisition of Reuters Group
Reuters Group
by the Thomson Corporation
Thomson Corporation
in 2008, the Reuters
Reuters
news agency has been a part of Thomson Reuters, making up the media division. Reuters
Reuters
transmits news in English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Russian, Urdu, Arabic, Japanese, Korean, and Chinese
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Market Price
In economics, market price is the economic price for which a good or service is offered in the marketplace. It is of interest mainly in the study of microeconomics. Market value and market price are equal only under conditions of market efficiency, equilibrium, and rational expectations. On restaurant menus, "market price" (often abbreviated to m.p
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Embedded Value
The Embedded Value (EV) of a life insurance company is the present value of future profits plus adjusted net asset value. It is a construct from the field of actuarial science which allows insurance companies to be valued.Contents1 Background 2 Value of the insurer 3 Formula 4 Improvements 5 References 6 External linksBackground[edit] Life insurance
Life insurance
policies are long-term contracts, where the policyholder pays a premium to be covered against a possible future event (such as the death of the policyholder). Future income for the insurer consists of premiums paid by policyholders whilst future outgoings comprise claims paid to policyholders as well as various expenses
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Company
A company, abbreviated as co., is a legal entity made up of an association of people, be they natural, legal, or a mixture of both, for carrying on a commercial or industrial enterprise. Company
Company
members share a common purpose, and unite in order to focus their various talents and organize their collectively available skills or resources to achieve specific, declared goals
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Capital Market
A capital market is a financial market in which long-term debt (over a year) or equity-backed securities are bought and sold.[6] Capital markets channel the wealth of savers to those who can put it to long-term productive use, such as companies or governments making long-term investments.[a] Financial regulators like the Bank
Bank
of England (BoE) and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
(SEC) oversee capital markets to protect investors against fraud, among other duties. Modern capital markets are almost invariably hosted on computer-based electronic trading systems; most can be accessed only by entities within the financial sector or the treasury departments of governments and corporations, but some can be accessed directly by the public.[b] There are many thousands of such systems, most serving only small parts of the overall capital markets
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Trillion (short Scale)
This list contains selected positive numbers in increasing order, including counts of things, dimensionless quantity and probabilities. Each number is given a name in the short scale, which is used in English-speaking countries, as well as a name in the long scale, which is used in some of the countries that do not have English as their national language.Contents1 Smaller than 10−100 (one googolth) 2 10−100 to 10−30 3 10−30 4 10−27 5 10−24 6 10−21 7 10−18 8 10−15 9 10−12 10 10−9 11 10−6 12 10−3 13 10−2 14 10−1 15 100 16 101 17 102 18 103 19 104 20 105 21 106 22 107 23 108 24 109 25 1010 26 1011 27 1012 28 1015 29 1018 30 1021 31 1024 32 1027 33 1030 34 1033 35 1036 36 1039 37 1042 to 10100 38 10100 (one googol) to 1010100 (one googolplex) 39 Larger than 1010100 40 See also 41 References 42 External linksSmaller than 10−100 (one googolth)[edit]Mathematics – Numbers: The number zero is a natural, even number which quantif
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Economic Indicator
An economic indicator is a statistic about an economic activity. Economic indicators allow analysis of economic performance and predictions of future performance. One application of economic indicators is the study of business cycles. Economic indicators include various indices, earnings reports, and economic summaries: for example, the unemployment rate, quits rate (quit rate in U.S. English), housing starts, consumer price index (a measure for inflation), consumer leverage ratio, industrial production, bankruptcies, gross domestic product, broadband internet penetration, retail sales, stock market prices, and money supply changes. The leading business cycle dating committee in the United States
United States
of America is the National Bureau of Economic Research (private). The Bureau of Labor Statistics
Bureau of Labor Statistics
is the principal fact-finding agency for the U.S
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Real Versus Nominal Value (economics)
In economics, a real value of a good or other entity has been adjusted for inflation, enabling comparison of quantities as if prices had not changed. Changes in real terms therefore exclude the effect of inflation. In contrast with a real value, a nominal value has not been adjusted for inflation, and so changes in nominal value reflect at least in part the effect of inflation.Contents1 Prices and inflation 2 Real value 3 Real growth rate 4 Real wages and real gross domestic product 5 Example 6 Real interest rates 7 Cross-sectional comparison 8 See also 9 Notes 10 References 11 External linksPrices and inflation[edit] A representative collection of goods, or commodity bundle, is used for comparison purposes, to measure inflation. The nominal (unadjusted) value of the commodity bundle in a given year depends on prices current at the time, whereas the real value of the commodity bundle, if it is truly representative, remains the same
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Share Price
A share price is the price of a single share of a number of saleable stocks of a company, derivative or other financial asset. In layman's terms, the stock price is the highest amount someone is willing to pay for the stock, or the lowest amount that it can be bought for.Contents1 Behaviour of share prices 2 Share prices in the United States 3 History 4 See also 5 ReferencesBehaviour of share prices[edit] In economics and financial theory, analysts use random walk techniques to model behavior of asset prices, in particular share prices on stock markets, currency exchange rates and commodity prices. This practice has its basis in the presumption that investors act rationally and without biases, and that at any moment they estimate the value of an asset based on future expectations. Under these conditions, all existing information affects the price, which changes only when new information comes out
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Net Worth
Net worth is the value of all the non-financial and financial assets owned by an institutional unit or sector minus the value of all its outstanding liabilities.[1] Net worth can apply to companies, individuals, governments or economic sectors such as the sector of financial corporations or to entire countries.Contents1 Companies 2 Individuals 3 Governments 4 Countries 5 References 6 External linksCompanies[edit] Net worth in business is also referred to as (own) equity. It is generally based on the value of all assets and liabilities at the carrying value which is the value as expressed on the financial statements. To the extent items on the balance sheet do not express their true (market) value, the net worth will also be inaccurate
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Proxy (statistics)
In statistics, a proxy or proxy variable is a variable that is not in itself directly relevant, but that serves in place of an unobservable or immeasurable variable.[1] In order for a variable to be a good proxy, it must have a close correlation, not necessarily linear, with the variable of interest. This correlation might be either positive or negative. Proxy variable must relate to unobserved variable, must correlate with disturbance, and must not correlate with regressors once disturbance is controlled for. Examples[edit] In social sciences, proxy measurements are often required to stand in for variables that cannot be directly measured. This process of standing in is also known as operationalization. Per-capita GDP
GDP
is often used as a proxy for measures of standard of living or quality of life. Montgomery et al
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