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Maritz Rebellion
British victoryRebellion suppressed Rebel leaders imprisoned South Africa occupies German South West AfricaBelligerents British Empire Union of South Africa South African RepublicCommanders and leaders Jan Smuts Louis Botha Manie Maritz Christiaan de Wet Christian Frederick Beyers
Christian Frederick Beyers
 † Jan KempStrength32,000 12,000Casualties and losses101 killed and wounded 124 killed 229 wounded[1]v t eSouth West Africa CampaignMaritz Rebellion Angola Sandfontein Kakamas Trekkopjes Ota
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First Franco-Dahomean War
First
First
or 1st is the ordinal form of the number one (#1). First
First
or 1st may also refer to:World record, specifically the first instance
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Battle Of Kousséri
The battle of Kousséri
Kousséri
originated in French plans to occupy the Chari-Baguirmi region. In 1899–1900, the French organized three armed columns, one proceeding north from Congo, one east from Niger and another south from Algeria. The objective was to link all French possessions in Western Africa, and this was achieved April 21, 1900 on the right bank of the Chari in what is now Chad opposite Kousséri, in what today is northern Cameroon.Contents1 Prelude 2 Battle 3 Significance 4 Gallery 5 ReferencesPrelude[edit] In 1899, Sudanese warlord Rabih az-Zubayr
Rabih az-Zubayr
could field some 10,000 infantry and cavalry, all provided with rifles (except for 400 rifles, these were mostly obsolete), plus a great number of auxiliary troops equipped with lances or bows
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Louis Botha
Louis Botha
Louis Botha
(Afrikaans pronunciation: [ˈlu.i ˈbʊəta]; 27 September 1862 – 27 August 1919) was a South African politician who was the first Prime Minister of the Union of South Africa—the forerunner of the modern South African state. A Boer
Boer
war hero during the Second Boer War, he would eventually fight to have South Africa
South Africa
become a British Dominion. In 1905 as tacit Prime minister, he called for the newly discovered Cullinan Diamond
Cullinan Diamond
to be presented to King Edward VII
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Killed In Action
Killed in action (KIA) is a casualty classification generally used by militaries to describe the deaths of their own combatants at the hands of hostile forces.[1] The United States
United States
Department of Defense, for example, says that those declared KIA need not have fired their weapons but have been killed due to hostile attack. KIAs do not come from incidents such as accidental vehicle crashes and other "non-hostile" events or terrorism. KIA can be applied both to front-line combat troops and to naval, air and support troops. Someone who is killed in action during a particular event is denoted with a † (dagger) beside their name to signify their death in that event or events. Further, KIA denotes one to have been killed in action on the battlefield whereas died of wounds (DOW) relates to someone who survived to reach a medical treatment facility
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Jan Kemp (general)
Jan Christoffel Greyling Kemp (10 June 1872 – 31 December 1946) was a South African Boer
Boer
officer, rebel general, and politician.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Military career 3 Personal life 4 Legacy 5 Memoirs 6 References 7 Further readingEarly life[edit] Jan Kemp was born in the present Amersfoort district, Transvaal on 10 June 1872, the younger son of Jurie Johannes Kemp and Maria Aletta Greyling.[1] His maternal grandfather, Abraham Carel Greyling, a stepson of the Voortrekker
Voortrekker
leader, Piet Retief, was killed with Retief in 1838. His paternal grandfather, Petrus Johannes Kemp, emigrated from Belgium
Belgium
between 1830 and 1840.[1] He was educated at the Staatsgymnasium (State Gymnasium) in Pretoria.[1] He became a clerk in the Transvaal department of education in 1889
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British Empire
The British Empire
Empire
comprised the dominions, colonies, protectorates, mandates and other territories ruled or administered by the United Kingdom and its predecessor states. It originated with the overseas possessions and trading posts established by England
England
between the late 16th and early 18th centuries. At its height, it was the largest empire in history and, for over a century, was the foremost global power.[1] By 1913, the British Empire
Empire
held sway over 412 million people, 7001230000000000000♠23% of the world population at the time,[2] and by 1920, it covered 35,500,000 km2 (13,700,000 sq mi),[3] 7001240000000000000♠24% of the Earth's total land area.[4] As a result, its political, legal, linguistic and cultural legacy is widespread
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Second Franco-Dahomean War
The Second Franco-Dahomean War, which raged from 1892 to 1894, was a major conflict between the French Third Republic, led by General Alfred-Amédée Dodds, and the Kingdom of Dahomey
Dahomey
under King Béhanzin
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First Matabele War
Rhodesia British South Africa Company Tswana (Bechuana) Ndebele KingdomCommanders and leadersCecil Rhodes Leander Starr Jameson Major Allan Wilson † Major Patrick Forbes Khama III King Lobengula † Mjaan, Chief inDunaStrength750 Company troops 1000 Tswana 80,000 spearmen 20,000 riflemenCasualties and lossesca
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Anglo-Ashanti Wars
 British Empire British-allied African states  Ashanti EmpireCommanders and leaders King George IV King William IV Queen Victoria Alexander Gordon Laing Sir Charles MacCarthy  † Field Marshal Garnet Wolseley Osei Bonsu Osei Yaw Akoto Kwaku Dua I Panyin Kofi Karikari Mensa Bonsu Kwaku Dua II Prempeh I
Prempeh I
 (POW)Strength 11,000 (1st) 2,500 (3rd) 2,200 (4th) 2,500 (5th) 20,000 (1st)   Ashanti E
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First Italo-Ethiopian War
196,000[3]80–100,000 with firearms, rest with spears and swords[nb 1]Casualties and losses15,000 dead[5]9,000 dead[6] 17,000 dead[5]v t eFirst Italo-Ethiopian WarHalai Coatit Amba Alagi Mek'ele Adwa Tigrayv t eScramble for AfricaBoer War (1880) Tunisia
Tunisia
(1881) Sudan (1881) Egypt (1882) Wassoulou (1883) Eritrea
Eritrea
(1887) Dahomey (1890) Mashonaland (1890) Dahomey (1892) Matabeleland (1893) Wassoulou (1894) Ashanti (1895) Ethiopia
Ethiopia
(1895) Matabeleland (1896) Zanzibar (1896) Benin (1897) Wassoulou (1898) Chad (1898) (Kousséri) Fashoda (1898) South Africa (1899) Namibia (1904) Tanganyika (1905) Morocco (1905) South Africa (1906) Ouaddai (1909) Morocco (1911) Morocco (1911) Tripolitania (1911) South Africa (1914)The First Italo-Ethiopian War
First Italo-Ethiopian War
was fought between Italy and Ethiopia from 1895 to 1896
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Second Matabele War
Rhodesia British South Africa Company Ndebele (Matabele) ShonaCommanders and leadersRobert Baden-Powell Frederick Carrington Cecil Rhodes Mlimo † Sikombo InyandaCasualties and losses~400 ~50,000v t eSecond Matabele WarWar in MatabelelandBulawayo Matobo Hills Assassination
Assassination
of MlimoWar in MashonalandAlice Minev t eScramble for AfricaBoer War (1880) Tunisia (1881) Sudan (1881) Egypt (1882) Wassoulou (1883) Eritrea (1887) Dahomey (1890)
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Anglo-Zanzibar War
The Anglo-Zanzibar War
Anglo-Zanzibar War
was a military conflict fought between the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and the Zanzibar Sultanate
Zanzibar Sultanate
on 27 August 1896. The conflict lasted between 38 and 45 minutes, marking it as the shortest recorded war in history.[3] The immediate cause of the war was the death of the pro-British Sultan
Sultan
Hamad bin Thuwaini on 25 August 1896 and the subsequent succession of Sultan
Sultan
Khalid bin Barghash. The British authorities preferred Hamud bin Muhammed, who was more favourable to British interests, as sultan. In accordance with a treaty signed in 1886, a condition for accession to the sultanate was that the candidate obtain the permission of the British consul, and Khalid had not fulfilled this requirement
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Benin Expedition Of 1897
The Benin Expedition of 1897
Benin Expedition of 1897
was a punitive expedition by a United Kingdom force of 1,200 under Admiral Sir Harry Rawson
Sir Harry Rawson
in response to the ambush of a previous British-led party under Acting Consul General James Philips (which had left all but two men dead).[1] Rawson's troops captured, burned, and looted Benin City, bringing to an end the west African Kingdom of Benin. As a result, much of the country's art, including the Benin Bronzes, were relocated to Britain.Contents1 Background 2 The "Benin Massacre" 3 British objectives 4 Aftermath 5 Movement for repatriation of looted objects 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksBackground[edit]Ovonramwen, Oba of BeninAt the end of the 19th century, the Kingdom of Benin
Kingdom of Benin
had managed to retain its independence and the Oba exercised a monopoly over trade which the British found irksome
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Voulet–Chanoine Mission
The Voulet–Chanoine Mission
Voulet–Chanoine Mission
or Central African-Chad Mission (French: mission Afrique Centrale-Tchad) was a French military expedition sent out from Senegal
Senegal
in 1898 to conquer the Chad Basin
Chad Basin
and unify all French territories in West Africa. This expedition operated jointly with two other expeditions, the Foureau-Lamy and Gentil missions, which advanced from Algeria
Algeria
and Middle Congo respectively. With the death of the Muslim warlord Rabih az-Zubayr, the greatest ruler in the region, and the creation of the Military Territory of Chad in 1900, the Voulet–Chanoine Mission
Voulet–Chanoine Mission
had accomplished all its goals
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Herero Wars
German Empire German South West AfricaHerero, Namaqua, and other NamibiansCommanders and leaders Lothar von Trotha Samuel Maharero, Hendrik WitbooiStrengthInitial Strength:~2,000,[1] Eventual strength: Almost 20,000,[2] Herero: 10,000,[3]Casualties and lossesKIA: 676, MIA:76, WIA: 907, died from disease: 689, civilians: 100[4] As many as 65-70,000 including civilians[4]v t eHerero WarsOkahandja Omaruru Ongandjira Ovuimbu Waterberg Herero and Namaqua Genocidev t eScramble for AfricaBoer War (1880) Tunisia (1881) Sudan (1881) Egypt (1882) Wassoulou (1883) Eritrea (1887) Dahomey (1890) Mashonaland (1890) Dahomey (1892) Matabeleland (1893) Wassoulou (1894) Ashanti (1895) Ethiopia (1895) Matabeleland (1896) Zanzibar (1896) Benin (1897) Wassoulou (1898) Chad (1898) (Kousséri) Fashoda (1898)
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