HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Marine Mammal
Marine mammals are aquatic mammals that rely on the ocean and other marine ecosystems for their existence. They include animals such as seals, whales, manatees, sea otters and polar bears. They do not represent a distinct taxon or systematic grouping, but rather have a polyphyletic relation due to convergent evolution, as in they do not have an immediate common ancestor. They are also unified by their reliance on the marine environment for feeding. Marine mammal
Marine mammal
adaptation to an aquatic lifestyle varies considerably between species. Both cetaceans and sirenians are fully aquatic and therefore are obligate water dwellers. Seals and sea-lions are semiaquatic; they spend the majority of their time in the water, but need to return to land for important activities such as mating, breeding and molting. In contrast, both otters and the polar bear are much less adapted to aquatic living
[...More...]

"Marine Mammal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Critically Endangered
A critically endangered (CR) species is one which has been categorized by the International Union for Conservation of Nature
International Union for Conservation of Nature
(IUCN) as facing an extremely high risk of extinction in the wild.[1] As of 2014, there are 2464 animal and 2104 plant species with this assessment, compared with 1998 levels of 854 and 909, respectively.[2] As the IUCN Red List
IUCN Red List
does not consider a species extinct until extensive, targeted surveys have been conducted, species which are possibly extinct are still listed as critically endangered
[...More...]

"Critically Endangered" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mating
In biology, mating (or mateing in British English) is the pairing of either opposite-sex or hermaphroditic organisms, usually for the purposes of sexual reproduction. Some definitions limit the term to pairing between animals,[1] while other definitions extend the term to mating in plants and fungi. Fertilization
Fertilization
is the fusion of both sex cell or gamete.[2] Copulation is the union of the sex organs of two sexually reproducing animals for insemination and subsequent internal fertilization. Mating
Mating
may also lead to external fertilization, as seen in amphibians, fishes and plants. For the majority of species, mating is between two individuals of opposite sexes. However, for some hermaphroditic species, copulation is not required because the parent organism is capable of self-fertilization (autogamy); for example, banana slugs. The term mating is also applied to related processes in bacteria, archaea and viruses
[...More...]

"Mating" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Habitat Degradation
Habitat
Habitat
destruction is the process in which natural habitat is rendered unable to support the species present. In this process, the organisms that previously used the site are displaced or destroyed, reducing biodiversity.[1] Habitat
Habitat
destruction by human activity is mainly for the purpose of harvesting natural resources for industrial production and urbanization. Clearing habitats for agriculture is the principal cause of habitat destruction. Other important causes of habitat destruction include mining, logging, trawling and urban sprawl
[...More...]

"Habitat Degradation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bycatch
Bycatch, in the fishing industry, is a fish or other marine species that is caught unintentionally while catching certain target species and target sizes of fish, crabs etc. Bycatch
Bycatch
is either of a different species, the wrong sex, or is undersized or juvenile individuals of the target species. The term "bycatch" is also sometimes used for untargeted catch in other forms of animal harvesting or collecting. In 1997, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) defined bycatch as "total fishing mortality, excluding that accounted directly by the retained catch of target species".[1] Bycatch
Bycatch
contributes to fishery decline and is a mechanism of overfishing for unintentional catch.[2] The average annual bycatch rate in the U.S
[...More...]

"Bycatch" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

West Indian Manatee
The West Indian manatee
West Indian manatee
( Trichechus
Trichechus
manatus) or "sea cow", also known as American manatee, is a manatee, and the largest surviving member of the aquatic mammal order Sirenia
Sirenia
(which also includes the dugong and the extinct Steller's sea cow). The West Indian manatee
West Indian manatee
is a species distinct from the Amazonian manatee (T. inunguis) and the African manatee
African manatee
(T. senegalensis). Based on genetic and morphological studies, the West Indian manatee
West Indian manatee
is divided into two subspecies, the Florida
Florida
manatee (T. m. latirostris) and the Antillean or Caribbean
Caribbean
manatee (T. m
[...More...]

"West Indian Manatee" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Afrotheria
See below Afrotheria
Afrotheria
is a clade of mammals, the living members of which belong to groups that are either currently living in Africa
Africa
or of African origin: golden moles, elephant shrews (also known as sengis), tenrecs, aardvarks, hyraxes, elephants, sea cows, and several extinct clades. They share few anatomical features but many are partly or entirely African in their distribution. This probably reflects the fact that Africa
Africa
was an island continent through the early Cenozoic. Because the continent was isolated by water, Laurasian
Laurasian
groups such as insectivores, rabbits, carnivorans and ungulates could not become established. Instead, the niches occupied by those groups were filled by tenrecs, hyraxes and elephants that evolved from the ancestral afrothere
[...More...]

"Afrotheria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hyrax
Hyraxes (from the Greek ὕραξ, hýrax, "shrewmouse"), also called dassies,[1] are small, thickset, herbivorous mammals in the order Hyracoidea. Hyraxes are well-furred, rotund animals with short tails. Typically, they measure between 30 and 70 cm (12 and 28 in) long and weigh between 2 and 5 kg (4.4 and 11 lb). They are superficially similar to pikas or rodents (especially marmots), but are more closely related to elephants and manatees. Four extant species are recognised; the rock hyrax (Procavia capensis), the yellow-spotted rock hyrax ( Heterohyrax
Heterohyrax
brucei), the western tree hyrax ( Dendrohyrax
Dendrohyrax
dorsalis) and the southern tree hyrax (D. arboreus)
[...More...]

"Hyrax" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Caribbean Monk Seal
Monachus tropicalis (Gray, 1850)[1] Phoca
Phoca
tropicalis Gray, 1850[1]The Caribbean monk seal, West Indian seal or sea wolf (as early explorers referred to it), Neomonachus
Neomonachus
tropicalis, was a species of seal native to the Caribbean and is now believed to be extinct
[...More...]

"Caribbean Monk Seal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tethytheria
Tethytheria
Tethytheria
is a clade of mammals that includes the sirenians and proboscideans, as well as the extinct order Embrithopoda.[1] Though there is strong anatomical and molecular support for the monophyly of Tethytheria, the interrelationships between the included taxa remain disputed. The tethytheres are united by several characters, including anteriorly facing orbits and more or less bilophodont cheek teeth (double transverse ridges on the crowns of the teeth)
[...More...]

"Tethytheria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aboriginal Whaling
Aboriginal whaling
Aboriginal whaling
is the hunting of whales carried out by aboriginal groups who have a tradition of whaling. (The hunting of smaller cetaceans is covered at Dolphin
Dolphin
drive hunting.) [2] Under the terms of the 1986 moratorium on whaling, the International Whaling
Whaling
Commission allows whaling carried out by aboriginal groups if it occurs on a subsistence basis, known as Aboriginal Subsistence Whaling. Whaling
Whaling
of this type is restricted to native peoples and others working on their behalf, as defined by the International Whaling
Whaling
Commission.[3] The IWC says that:[4]Since its inception, the IWC has recognised that indigenous or ‘aboriginal subsistence’ whaling is of a different nature to commercial whaling. It is thus not subject to the moratorium
[...More...]

"Aboriginal Whaling" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Proboscidea
†Eritherium †Moeritherium †Plesielephantiformes ElephantiformesThe Proboscidea
Proboscidea
(from the Greek προβοσκίς and the Latin proboscis) are a taxonomic order of afrotherian mammals containing one living family, Elephantidae, and several extinct families. This order, first described by J. Illiger in 1811, encompasses the trunked mammals.[1] In addition to their enormous size, later proboscideans are distinguished by tusks and long, muscular trunks; these features were less developed or absent in the smaller early proboscideans. Beginning in the mid Miocene, most members of this order were very large animals
[...More...]

"Proboscidea" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Molting
In biology, moulting (British English), or molting (American English), also known as sloughing, shedding, or in many invertebrates, ecdysis, is the manner in which an animal routinely casts off a part of its body (often, but not always, an outer layer or covering), either at specific times of the year, or at specific points in its life cycle. Moulting
Moulting
can involve shedding the epidermis (skin), pelage (hair, feathers, fur, wool), or other external layer. In some groups, other body parts may be shed, for example, wings in some insects or the entire exoskeleton in arthropods.Contents1 Examples 2 In birds2.1 Forced moulting3 In reptiles 4 In arthropods 5 In dogs 6 In amphibians 7 Gallery 8 References 9 External linksExamples[edit]Group Item shed Timing NotesCats Fur Usually around spring-summer time Cats moult fur around spring-summer time to get rid of their "winter coat"
[...More...]

"Molting" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Breeding In The Wild
Breeding in the wild is the natural process of animal reproduction occurring in the natural habitat of a given species
[...More...]

"Breeding In The Wild" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Common Ancestor
Common descent
Common descent
describes how, in evolutionary biology, a group of organisms shares a most recent common ancestor. There is "massive"[1] evidence of common descent of all life on Earth
Earth
from the last universal common ancestor (LUCA).[1][2] In July 2016, scientists reported identifying a set of 355 genes from the LUCA, by comparing the genomes of the three domains of life, archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes.[3] Common ancestry between organisms of different species arises during speciation, in which new species are established from a single ancestral population. Organisms which share a more-recent common ancestor are more closely related
[...More...]

"Common Ancestor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mustelidae
Lutrinae
Lutrinae
(otters) Melinae
Melinae
(European badgers) Mellivorinae
Mellivorinae
(honey badgers) Taxidiinae
Taxidiinae
(American badgers) Mustelinae
Mustelinae
(weasels, tayra, wolverines, martens, polecats)Note ambiguity about classification at the section Systematics.The Mustelidae
Mustelidae
(from Latin mustela, weasel) are a family of carnivorous mammals, including weasels, badgers, otters, martens, mink, and wolverines, among others. Mustelids are diverse and the largest family in the order Carnivora. The internal classification is still disputed, with rival proposals containing between two and eight subfamilies
[...More...]

"Mustelidae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.