HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Marian Korn
Marian Korn (1914–1987) was a Czechoslovakian-born printmaker. She was born February 15, 1914 in Chomutov, Austro-Hungarian Empire, (today Czech Republic). In 1931, she moved to Prague, and in 1931, she graduated from the Women's College of Prague. She married in 1938, and emigrated to the United States in 1939. In 1949, she moved to Tokyo with her entrepreneur husband Frank and two daughters.[1] In 1970, Marian accompanied one of her daughters to the atelier of Gaston Petit, where the daughter had been taking lessons
[...More...]

"Marian Korn" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Screen Printing
Screen printing
Screen printing
is a printing technique whereby a mesh is used to transfer ink onto a substrate, except in areas made impermeable to the ink by a blocking stencil. A blade or squeegee is moved across the screen to fill the open mesh apertures with ink, and a reverse stroke then causes the screen to touch the substrate momentarily along a line of contact. This causes the ink to wet the substrate and be pulled out of the mesh apertures as the screen springs back after the blade has passed. Screen printing
Screen printing
is also a stencil method of print making in which a design is imposed on a screen of polyester or other fine mesh, with blank areas coated with an impermeable substance. Ink is forced into the mesh openings by the fill blade or squeegee and by wetting the substrate, transferred onto the printing surface during the squeegee stroke. As the screen rebounds away from the substrate the ink remains on the substrate
[...More...]

"Screen Printing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Austro-Hungarian Empire
Austria-Hungary, often referred to as the Austro-Hungarian Empire
Empire
or the Dual Monarchy
Dual Monarchy
in English-language sources, was a constitutional union of the Austrian Empire
Austrian Empire
(the Kingdoms and Lands Represented in the Imperial Council, or Cisleithania) and the Kingdom of Hungary ( Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen
Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen
or Transleithania) that existed from 1867 to 1918, when it collapsed as a result of defeat in World War I. The union was a result of the Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867 and came into existence on 30 March 1867
[...More...]

"Austro-Hungarian Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Système Universitaire De Documentation
The système universitaire de documentation or SUDOC is a system used by the libraries of French universities and higher education establishments to identify, track and manage the documents in their possession. The catalog, which contains more than 10 million references, allows students and researcher to search for bibliographical and location information in over 3,400 documentation centers. It is maintained by the Bibliographic Agency for Higher Education (fr) (ABES). External links[edit]Official websiteThis article relating to library science or information science is a stub
[...More...]

"Système Universitaire De Documentation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
[...More...]

"International Standard Name Identifier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
[...More...]

"Library Of Congress Control Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Couvin
Couvin
Couvin
(French pronunciation: ​[ku.vɛ̃]; Walloon: Couvén) is a Walloon municipality located in the Belgian province of Namur. On 1 January 2006 the municipality had 13,476 inhabitants. Couvin
Couvin
is the second largest municipality of Belgium
Belgium
by surface area, after Tournai. The total area is 206.93 km², giving a population density of 65 inhabitants per km². The municipality consists of the following sub-municipalities: Couvin proper, Aublain, Boussu-en-Fagne, Brûly, Brûly-de-Pesche, Cul-des-Sarts, Dailly, Frasnes-lez-Couvin, Gonrieux, Mariembourg, Pesche, Petigny, Petite-Chapelle, and Presgaux.River Eau Noire and the Rue de la FalaiseContents1 Transport 2 Tourism 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksTransport[edit] Couvin
Couvin
railway station provides the town with a rail link direct to Charleroi
[...More...]

"Couvin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Tikotin Museum Of Japanese Art
The Tikotin Museum of Japanese Art
Tikotin Museum of Japanese Art
is a museum on the crest of Mount Carmel, in Haifa, Israel, dedicated to the preservation and exhibition of Japanese art. It is the only such museum in the Middle East. It was established in 1959 on the initiative of Felix Tikotin of the Netherlands, and Abba Hushi, then mayor of Haifa.[1]Contents1 History 2 Collections 3 Educational activities 4 Awards and recognition 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit]One of the museum's several exhibition halls.Felix Tikotin, an architect by profession, was an internationally renowned collector and dealer in Japanese works of art. For more than forty years he amassed his valuable and rare collection and organized exhibitions of Japanese art
Japanese art
in many museums. During the Second World War, because he was Jewish, Felix Tikotin fled from the Nazis
[...More...]

"Tikotin Museum Of Japanese Art" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Setagaya Art Museum
The Setagaya Art Museum (世田谷美術館, Setagaya Bijutsukan) is an art museum in Yōga, Setagaya, Tokyo. The museum, which opened March 30, 1986, houses a permanent gallery and mounts seasonal exhibitions.Contents1 Structure 2 Collections 3 Annexes 4 Access 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksStructure[edit] The main building of the museum, a contemporary design by architect Shōzō Uchii, is on a corner of Kinuta Park at 1-2 Kinutakōen, Setagaya, Tokyo.[1] Collections[edit] The gallery's permanent collection contains a great number of photographs, particularly by Kineo Kuwabara and (numbering in the hundreds) Kōji Morooka
[...More...]

"Setagaya Art Museum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

National Museum Of Modern Art, Tokyo
The Tokyo
Tokyo
National Museum of Modern Art (東京国立近代美術館, Tōkyō Kokuritsu Kindai Bijutsukan) in Tokyo, Japan, is the foremost museum collecting and exhibiting modern Japanese art.[1] This Tokyo
Tokyo
museum is also known by the English acronym MOMAT (National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo). The museum is known for its collection of 20th-century art and includes Western-style and Nihonga
Nihonga
artists.Contents1 History 2 Collections2.1 Crafts Gallery 2.2 National Film Center 2.3 Union catalog3 Notes 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo, was the first National Museum of Art in Japan
Japan
and dates back to 1952, when it was established as an institution governed by the Ministry of Education. The architect of the building was Kunio Maekawa
[...More...]

"National Museum Of Modern Art, Tokyo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

National Museum Of Art Of Romania
The National Museum of Art of Romania
Romania
(Romanian: Muzeul Național de Artă al României) is located in the Royal Palace in Revolution Square, central Bucharest.[1] It features collections of medieval and modern Romanian art, as well as the international collection assembled by the Romanian royal family. The exhibition "Shadows and Light" ran from 15 July to 2 October 2005. With four centuries of French art, it was the largest exhibition of French painting in Central and Eastern Europe since 1945.[2] 77 works were exh
[...More...]

"National Museum Of Art Of Romania" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Harvard University Art Museums
The Harvard Art Museums
Harvard Art Museums
are part of Harvard University
Harvard University
and comprise three museums: the Fogg Museum
Fogg Museum
(established in 1895[1]), the Busch-Reisinger Museum (established in 1903[1]), and the Arthur M. Sackler Museum (established in 1985[1]) and four research centers: the Archaeological Exploration of Sardis (founded in 1958[2]), the Center for the Technical Study of Modern Art (founded in 2002),[3] the Harvard Art Museums
Harvard Art Museums
Archives, and the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies (founded in 1928[4]). The three museums that constitute the Harvard Art Museums
Harvard Art Museums
were initially integrated into a single institution under the name Harvard University
Harvard University
Art Museums in 1983
[...More...]

"Harvard University Art Museums" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Viscosity Printing
Viscosity
Viscosity
printing is a multi-color printmaking technique that incorporates principles of relief printing and intaglio printing. It was pioneered by Stanley William Hayter. The process uses the principle of viscosity to print multiple colors of ink from a single plate, rather than relying upon multiple plates for color separation. It is a fine art printmaking technique, making original prints in limited editions, as it is slow and allows too much variation between proofs to make large editions feasible. Color viscosity printing is among the latest developments in intaglio printmaking. Color viscosity printing was developed by a group working at Atelier 17
Atelier 17
in Paris in the mid-1950s
[...More...]

"Viscosity Printing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Paper Embossing
Embossing and debossing are the processes of creating either raised or recessed relief images and designs in paper and other materials. An embossed pattern is raised against the background, while a debossed pattern is sunken into the surface of the material (but might protrude somewhat on the reverse, back side).Contents1 Techniques 2 Die materials 3 Embossing types3.1 Blind emboss 3.2 Registered emboss 3.3 Combination emboss 3.4 Pastelling 3.5 Glazing 3.6 Scorching4 Document authentication 5 On stamps 6 See also 7 References and sourcesTechniques[edit] Often used in combination with foil stamping, embossing alters the surface of paper stock or other substrates by providing a three-dimensional or raised effect on selected areas. The procedure requires the use of two dies: one that is raised and one that is recessed
[...More...]

"Paper Embossing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Photolithography
Photolithography, also termed optical lithography or UV lithography, is a process used in microfabrication to pattern parts of a thin film or the bulk of a substrate. It uses light to transfer a geometric pattern from a photomask to a light-sensitive chemical "photoresist", or simply "resist," on the substrate. A series of chemical treatments then either engraves the exposure pattern into, or enables deposition of a new material in the desired pattern upon the material underneath the photo resist. For example, in complex integrated circuits, a modern CMOS
CMOS
wafer will go through the photolithographic cycle up to 50 times. Photolithography
Photolithography
shares some fundamental principles with photography in that the pattern in the etching resist is created by exposing it to light, either directly (without using a mask) or with a projected image using an optical mask
[...More...]

"Photolithography" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.