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Maria Nagaya
Maria Feodorovna Nagaya (Russian: Мария Фёдоровна Нагая) (died 1608) was a Russian tsaritsa and fifth (possibly seventh) uncanonical wife of Ivan the Terrible. Life[edit] Maria married Ivan IV
Ivan IV
in 1581 and a year later gave birth to their son Dmitry. After the Tsar's death in 1584, Nagaya, her son and her brothers were sent into exile to Uglich
Uglich
by Boris Godunov, where she lived until the mysterious death of tsarevich Dmitry in 1591. Maria and her relatives were accused of "criminal negligence" and, as a result, her brothers were incarcerated and she was made a nun in a monastery. In 1605, after the accession of False Dmitriy I
False Dmitriy I
in Moscow, Nagaya "recognized" him as her son and returned to Moscow
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List Of Russian Consorts
Consort may refer to: Titles[edit]Queen consort, wife of a reigning king Prince consort, husband of a reigning queen King consort, rarely used alternative title for husband of a reigning queen Princess consort, rarely used alternative title for wife of a reigning king Viceregal consort of Canada, spouse of the Governor General of CanadaIn medicine[edit] Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT), reporting standards for clinical trialsOther uses[edit] Consort (nautical), unpowered, fully loaded Great Lakes vessels towed by larger vessels The female partner in tantric yab-yum Consort of instruments, term for instrumental ensembles Consort beagles, a British animal rights campaign to close Consort Kennels CONSORT Colleges, a consortium of college libraries in the U.S
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Uglich
Uglich
Uglich
(Russian: Углич, IPA: [ˈuɡlʲɪtɕ]) is a historic town in Yaroslavl
Yaroslavl
Oblast, Russia, which stands on the Volga River. Population: 34,507 (2010 Census);[5] 38,260 (2002 Census);[9] 39,975 (1989 Census).[10]Contents1 History1.1 Reign of Ivan the Terrible 1.2 Death of Tsarevich Dmitry 1.3 Later history2 Administrative and municipal status 3 Architecture 4 References4.1 Notes 4.2 Sources5 External linksHistory[edit] A local tradition dates the town's origins to 937.[citation needed] It was first documented in 1148 as Ugliche Pole (Corner Field).[citation needed] The town's name is thought to allude to the nearby turn in the Volga River. Uglich
Uglich
had been the seat of a small princedom from 1218 until 1328 when the local princes sold their rights to the great prince of Moscow
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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List Of Russian Rulers
This is a list of all reigning monarchs in the history of Russia. It includes titles Prince of Novgorod, Grand Prince of Kiev, Grand Prince of Vladimir, Grand Prince of Moscow, Tsar
Tsar
of All Rus', and Emperor
Emperor
of All Russia. The list started with a semi-legendary Prince of Novgorod Rurik
Rurik
sometime in the mid 9th century (862) and ended with the Emperor of All Russia Nicholas II who abdicated in 1917, and was executed with his family in 1918. The vast territory known today as Russia covers an area that has been known historically by various names, including Rus', Kievan Rus',[1][2] the Grand Duchy of Moscow, the Tsardom of Muscovy
Muscovy
and the Russian Empire, and the sovereigns of these many nations and throughout their histories have used likewise as wide a range of titles in their positions as chief magistrates of a country
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Property
Property, in the abstract, is what belongs to or with something, whether as an attribute or as a component of said thing
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Search And Seizure
Search and Seizure is a procedure used in many civil law and common law legal systems by which police or other authorities and their agents, who, suspecting that a crime has been committed, commence a search of a person's property and confiscate any relevant evidence found in connection to the crime.Dareton police search the vehicle of a suspected drug smuggler in Wentworth, in the state of New South Wales, Australia, near the border with VictoriaSome countries have certain provisions in their constitutions that provide the public with the right to be free from "unreasonable searches and seizures". This right is generally based on the premise that everyone is entitled to a reasonable right to privacy. Though specific interpretation may vary, this right can often require law enforcement to obtain a search warrant or consent of the owner before engaging in any form of search and seizure
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Moscow
Moscow
Moscow
(/ˈmɒskoʊ, -kaʊ/; Russian: Москва́, tr. Moskva, IPA: [mɐˈskva] ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of Russia, with 12.2 million residents within the city limits[11] and 17.1 million within the urban area.[12] Moscow
Moscow
is recognized as a Russian federal city. Moscow
Moscow
is a major political, economic, cultural, and scientific centre of Russia
Russia
and Eastern Europe, as well as the largest city entirely on the European continent. By broader definitions Moscow
Moscow
is among the world's largest cities, being the 14th largest metro area, the 18th largest agglomeration, the 15th largest urban area, and the 11th largest by population within city limits worldwide
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Monastery
A monastery is a building or complex of buildings comprising the domestic quarters and workplaces of monastics, monks or nuns, whether living in communities or alone (hermits). A monastery generally includes a place reserved for prayer which may be a chapel, church, or temple, and may also serve as an oratory. Monasteries vary greatly in size, comprising a small dwelling accommodating only a hermit, or in the case of communities anything from a single building housing only one senior and two or three junior monks or nuns, to vast complexes and estates housing tens or hundreds. A monastery complex typically comprises a number of buildings which include a church, dormitory, cloister, refectory, library, balneary and infirmary. Depending on the location, the monastic order and the occupation of its inhabitants, the complex may also include a wide range of buildings that facilitate self-sufficiency and service to the community
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Nun
A nun is a member of a religious community of women, typically living under vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience in the enclosure of a monastery.[1] While in common usage the terms nun and religious sister are often used interchangeably, they represent different forms of religious life; nuns are historically associated with living an ascetic life of prayer and contemplation in a monastery or convent, while religious sisters are devoted to an active vocation of prayer and charitable works in areas such as education and healthcare. Communities of nuns or religious sisters exist in numerous religious traditions, including Christianity, Jainism, Buddhism, Taoism, and Hinduism. In the Buddhist tradition, female monastics are known as Bhikkhuni, and take additional vows, compared to male monastics (bhikkhus); they are most common in Mahayana Buddhism, but have more recently become more prevalent in other traditions
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Prison
A prison,[a] also known as a correctional facility, jail,[b] gaol (dated, British English), penitentiary (American English), detention center[c] (American English) or remand center[d] is a facility in which inmates are forcibly confined and denied a variety of freedoms under the authority of the state. Prisons are most commonly used within a criminal justice system: people charged with crimes may be imprisoned until they are brought to trial; those pleading or being found guilty of crimes at trial may be sentenced to a specified period of imprisonment. Besides their use for punishing crimes, jails and prisons are frequently used by authoritarian regimes against perceived opponents. In American English, prison and jail are often treated as having separate definitions. The term prison or penitentiary tends to describe institutions that incarcerate people for longer periods of time, such as many years, and are operated by the state or federal governments
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Tsarevich
Tsarevich[1] (Russian: Царе́вич, IPA: [tsɐˈrʲevʲɪtɕ]) is a Slavic title given to tsars' sons. Under the 1797 Pauline house law, the title was discontinued and replaced with Tsesarevich
Tsesarevich
for the heir apparent alone. His younger brothers were called Velikiy Knjaz, meaning Grand Prince, although it was commonly translated to English as Grand Duke. English sources often confused the terms Tsarevich
Tsarevich
and Tsesarevich. Alexei Nikolaevich, the only son of Nicholas II, was the last member of Russian royalty to be called Tsarevich
Tsarevich
even though he was the Tsesarevich. In olden times, the term was also applied to descendants of the khans (tsars) of Kazan, Kasimov, and Siberia after these khanates had been conquered by Russia. See Tsareviches of Siberia, for example
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Exile
To be in exile means to be away from one's home (i.e. city, state, or country), while either being explicitly refused permission to return or being threatened with imprisonment or death upon return. It can be a form of punishment and solitude.[1] It is common to distinguish between "internal exile", i.e., forced resettlement within the country of residence, and "external exile", which is deportation outside the country of residence.[2] Although most commonly used to describe an individual situation, the term is also used for groups (especially ethnic or national groups), or for an entire government. Terms such as "diaspora" and "refugee" describe group exile, both voluntary and forced, and "government in exile" describes a government of a country that has been forced to relocate and argue its legitimacy from outside that country. Exile
Exile
can also be a self-imposed departure from one's homeland
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Tsar
Tsar
Tsar
(/zɑːr/ or /tsɑːr/) (Old Church Slavonic: ц︢рь [usually written thus with a title] or цар, цaрь), also spelled csar, or czar, is a title used to designate East and South Slavic monarchs or supreme rulers of Eastern Europe. As a system of government in the Tsardom of Russia
Tsardom of Russia
and the Russian Empire, it is known as Tsarist autocracy, or Tsarism
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Dynasty
A dynasty (UK: /ˈdɪnəsti/, US: /ˈdaɪnəsti/) is a sequence of rulers from the same family,[1] usually in the context of a feudal or monarchical system, but sometimes also appearing in elective republics. The dynastic family or lineage may be known as a "house",[2] which may be styled as "royal", "princely", "ducal", "comital", etc., depending upon the chief or present title borne by its members. Historians periodize the histories of many sovereign states, such as Ancient Egypt, the Carolingian Empire
Carolingian Empire
and Imperial China, using a framework of successive dynasties. As such, the term "dynasty" may be used to delimit the era during which the family reigned and to describe events, trends, and artifacts of that period ("a Ming-dynasty vase")
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Rurik Dynasty
The Rurik
Rurik
dynasty, or Rurikids (Russian: Рю́риковичи, Ryúrikovichi; Ukrainian: Рю́риковичі, Ryúrykovychi; Belarusian: Ру́рыкавічы, Rúrykavichi, literally "sons of Rurik"), was a dynasty founded by the Varangian[1] prince Rurik, who established himself in Novgorod
Novgorod
around the year AD 862.[2] The Rurikids were the ruling dynasty of Kievan Rus'
Kievan Rus'
(after 882), as well as the successor principalities of Galicia-Volhynia
Galicia-Volhynia
(after 1199), Chernigov, Vladimir-Suzdal, and the Grand Duchy of Moscow, and the founders of the Tsardom of Russia. They ruled until 1610 and the Time of Troubles, following which they were succeeded by the Romanovs
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